MSA 11: The Languages of Modernism
Montréal, Québec, Canada
November 5-8, 2009
Delta Centre-Ville


Special Announcement: MSA members may use the new CFP database to post individual CFPs for MSA 11!

Call for Papers

CALL FOR SEMINAR, PANEL, AND ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS

The annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association will take place at the Hotel Delta Centre-Ville in Montreal, Quebec, November 5-8, 2009. The MSA conference brings together more than 600 scholars from a variety of disciplines from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and elsewhere. This year the MSA XI conference, co-hosted by McGill University, Concordia University, and Université de Montréal, is devoted to the general theme “Languages of Modernism.” We invite panels, seminars, and proposals that address this theme, although participants are welcome to propose papers and panels that speak to their own research interests as well.

“Languages of Modernism” refers not only to standardized verbal languages such as French and English, but also non-verbal languages associated with film, painting, sculpture, music, and performance. Certain technologies and cultures generate their own idioms and idiolects: modernist architecture deals with the interplay between “vernacular” and “international” styles; modernist musicians address “languages” distinctive to composers and cultures. Poetry, drama, and fiction generate their own languages. These languages are inflected by cross-cultural and multi-cultural influences, which are further transformed by class, gender, migration, region, occupation, age, race, accents. Many modernists—whether writers, film-makers, visual artists or performers—lived between, or among, languages. Proposals might therefore consider instances of translation from one language to another or works that mix languages. Proposals might also consider the implications of the media through which modernist languages are transmitted: radio broadcasts, film, dance, little magazines, anthologies, deluxe editions. By bringing together papers from a diversity of fields, we seek to promote interdisciplinary dialogue among the languages of modernism.

Participants are welcome to submit panel, seminar, and roundtable proposals on any topic. The primary criterion for selection will be the quality of the proposal, not its connection to the conference theme. All email queries should be directed to the conference organizers as msa.english@mcgill.ca

All those who attend the MSA conference must be members of the organization with dues paid for 2009-10. (MSA membership runs from July 1 until June 30 each year.)

Because we wish to involve as many people as possible as active participants, MSA limits multiple appearances on the program. Thus, you may participate once, but only once, in each of the following categories:

—Seminar, either as leader or as presenter
—Panel or roundtable, as chair
—“What Are You Reading?” session

You may lead a seminar, present a paper on a panel, and participate in a “What Are You Reading” session, but you may not present two papers. MSA rules do not allow panel or roundtable organizers to chair their own session if they are also speaking in the session. The session chair must be someone who is otherwise not participating in the session. Panel organizers are encouraged to identify a moderator and include this information with their proposals; the MSA Program Committee can also ask another conference attendee to serve as a moderator.



CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

Deadline: Monday, March 9, 2009

Leading a Seminar: (Information for Seminar Leaders)
Seminars are one the most significant features of the MSA conference. Participants write brief “position papers” (5-7 pages) that are read and circulated prior to the conference. Because their size is limited to 15 participants, seminars generate lively exchange and often facilitate future collaborations. The format also allows a larger number of conference attendees to seek financial support from their institutions as they educate themselves and their colleagues on subjects of mutual interest. Seminars are two hours in length.
Please note that this is the call for seminar leaders. Sign-up for seminar participants will take place on a first-come, first-served basis starting in May, coinciding with registration for the conference.

Seminar Topics:
There are no limits on topics, but past experience has shown that the more clearly defined the topic and the more guidance provided by the leader, the more productive the discussion. “Clearly defined” should not be confused with “narrow,” as extremely narrow seminar topics tend to exclude many potential applicants. To scan past seminar topics, go to the Conference Archives http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conference.html on the MSA website, click the link to a prior conference, and then click on “Conference Schedule” or “Conference Program.” You'll find seminars listed along with panels and other events.

Proposing a Seminar:
Seminar proposals must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: SEMINAR PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF SEMINAR LEADER] (e.g., SEMINAR PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* List the seminar leader's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Provide a brief curriculum vitae (including teaching experience) for the seminar leader
* Give a brief description (up to 100 words) of the proposed topic
Submit proposals by MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 to:
msa.english@mcgill.ca

Seminars will be selected in late March 2009.


CALL FOR PANEL PROPOSALS

Deadline: Monday, May 11, 2009

Topics are not limited to the theme “Languages of Modernism.” Successful proposals will introduce topics that promise to expand research and debate on a topic, and will present a clear rationale for the papers’ collective goal. Please bear in mind these guidelines:

* We encourage interdisciplinary panels and discourage panels on single authors.
* In order to encourage discussion, preference will be given to panels with three participants, though panels of four will be considered.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as panelists. However, panels composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than panels that include presenters with degrees together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: PANEL PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF PANEL ORGANIZER] (e.g., PANEL PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Chair's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a chair, we will locate one for you)
* Panelists' names, paper titles, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, and contact information
* A maximum 500-word abstract of the panel as a whole
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each panelist

Submit proposals by MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 to:
msa.english@mcgill.ca

Panels will be selected by mid-June.



CALL FOR ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS

Deadline: Monday, May 11, 2009

Unlike panels, which generally feature a sequence of 15-20 minute talks followed by discussion, roundtables gather a group of participants around a shared concern in order to generate discussion among the roundtable participants and with the audience. To this end, instead of delivering full-length papers, participants are asked to deliver short position statements in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer, or they take turns responding to prompts from the moderator. The bulk of the session should be devoted to discussion. No paper titles are listed in the program, only the names of participants.

Other MSA roundtable policies:

* Roundtables may feature as many as 6 speakers.
* We particularly welcome roundtables featuring participants from multiple disciplines, and we discourage roundtables on single authors.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as speakers. However, roundtables composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than roundtables that include degreed presenters together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZER] (e.g., ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Moderator's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a moderator, we will locate one for you)
* Speakers' names, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, mailing addresses, phones, faxes, and e-mail addresses
* A maximum 500-word rationale for the roundtable
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each speaker
Send proposals by MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 TO:

msa.english@mcgill.ca

Roundtables will be selected mid-June.



“WHAT ARE YOU READING?”

Several years ago, the MSA introduced a new kind of session, “What Are You Reading?” Designed to take advantage, in a productive new way, of the presence in one place of modernist scholars from many locations, institutions, and fields, each ninety-minute forum consists of 8 to 10 participants and a moderator. Led by the moderator, each participant reports for a few minutes on a scholarly or critical book in modernist studies, sketching the work's content and explaining why she or he found it exciting to share with other scholars. Time permitting, moderators then lead discussions in which participants can seek clarifications, draw connections, and propose further related reading. NB: These sessions will not be scheduled for Saturday night, when everyone prefers to eat, drink, and be merry. They will be spread across regular time slots.

A major goal of "What Are You Reading?" is to facilitate the sharing of exciting new scholarship (or the "rediscovery" of older scholarship) and to foster interdisciplinarity by exposing participants to work in modernist fields other than their own. Open only to those who register for them in advance, these sessions can be very productive.
"What Are You Reading" is not intended as a venue for discussion of primary texts or works, for self-promotion, or for the enacting of intellectual conflicts. Participants will therefore be asked not to present on primary texts or works (though new editions and catalogues are welcome), their own publications, or scholarship they did not substantially admire.

To participate, all you will need to do is check the appropriate box on your MSA registration form and name a book you might be interested in presenting. MSA registration will begin mid-May; look for announcements at that time.

Please note that you will have to register by 29 September to be included in “What Are You Reading?”

You will be notified of the time and location of your forum in early October. There is no need to submit any proposal or paper in connection with this event, nor do you need to contact your moderator in advance. Simply check the box, receive notice of your time and location, and show up.

Please direct all inquiries to: msa.english@mcgill.ca