Member Services

MSA CFPs Ending in 2019

The Call for Papers page is open to all CFPs in modernist studies. We encourage all members (and potential members) to use this site for announcing CFPs for the Annual MSA Conference. If you have any questions, please contact the MSA Webmaster.

March

February



Politics of Fear,Politics of Hope: Postcritique and Joseph Conrad

This CFP IS NOT for a MSA Conference

\"Politics of Fear, Politics of Hope: Postcritique and Joseph Conrad”

We are seeking essay proposals for an edited volume focusing on Conrad’s politics in relation to ideas of fear and/or hope. The postcritical turn encourages us to consider what literature does in the world—the social, emotional, and political effects of reading. The last two MLA panels organized by the Joseph Conrad Society of America reflect this approach: Conrad’s Politics of Fear in 2018 and Conrad’s Politics of Hope in 2019. Both panels examined Conrad’s texts in relation to recent events, offering new perspectives on literature’s contribution to political understanding.

For this volume we are particularly interested in essays that use Conrad’s writing to engage with postcritique, either constructively or critically, or that in other ways reflect Conrad’s continuing relevance today.

Essay proposals should be 250-300 words, accompanied by a brief CV. Essays will be 5000-7000 words, including notes and citations. Please email proposals and CVs to both jayparker@hsu.edu.hk and Jwexler@luc.edu by March 30. Accepted authors will be notified by 30 May and invited to submit completed essays by 1 January 2020. Please note that final acceptance will be confirmed upon receipt of the finished version of the essay.


Conference Location: Chicago, United States
Conference Starts: February 12, 2019
Conference Ends: March 30, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2019

For more information, contact: Joyce P Wexler






MLA 2020: T. S. Eliot and Identity/Politics

This CFP IS NOT for a MSA Conference

Call for Papers: MLA Convention
International T. S. Eliot Society panel at MLA Convention, Seattle 2020

“T. S. Eliot: Identity / Politics”

The phrase “identity politics” has become as highly charged as the phrase “politically correct”—more often deployed today as an invitation to attack or defend some group or form of affiliation. For the 2020 MLA in Seattle, the International T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor a panel that recognizes the power of the phrase and the importance of all that it points toward, but we intend to avoid the merely reactive, accusatory and defensive postures that often attend its use.

To that end, we encourage prospective panelists to pause and weigh each term carefully, thinking about how they are and are not necessarily connected. By means of the slash between the two nouns—Identity / Politics—we signal this emphasis on keeping each term lively and mobile, as proximate but also as distinct as possible. Questions that papers for this panel might address include:

* How have Eliot\'s own politics been reassessed and our understanding of his positions been made more nuanced with the release of so much new material in the Letters, Poems and Complete Prose?

* How does Eliot\'s \"mind of Europe\" speak to recent European politics: e.g. the Scottish independence movement, Brexit, the rise of the far right and nationalist politics in France, Hungary, and elsewhere? Does Eliot’s politically oriented writing of the 1930s and 1940s, in particular, prove relevant to thoughts about totalitarianism and authoritarianism today? (This writing includes his letters as well as his published and unpublished essays and, of course, the drama and poetry.)

* How do Eliot\'s notions of identity or sexual / gender politics, whether in his critical prose pieces or in such poems as The Waste Land, speak to our current cultural moment? Such a discussion might take up transgender rights; queer practice and identity; the construction of femininity; the construction of the racial, sexual Other in Eliot\'s work.

* What are Eliot\'s thoughts on American language and literature? Is there an American identity expressed in the languages of its people; might there be a politics corresponding to the languages of those peoples?

* Does genre in Eliot have aspects that might be considered under the identity / politics rubric? We suggest that his extensive speculations about and practices of art in different genres are not only matters of aesthetic experimentation but do invoke and address aspects of experience that fall under both sides of our panel’s title.

Send a 300-word abstract, plus a brief bio, by March 18 to John Whittier-Ferguson at johnaw@umich.edu.

John Whittier-Ferguson is a professor in the English Department at the University of Michigan, where he\'s been since 1990. During the academic year 2017-2018 he served as a visiting professor at the United States Air Force Academy. His most recent book, Mortality and Form in Late Modernist Literature, was published by Cambridge in the fall of 2015. He is the author of Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound (Oxford, 1996), and co-editor, with A. Walton Litz and Richard Ellmann, of James Joyce: Poems and Shorter Writings (Faber 1991). He is the Vice President of the International T. S. Eliot Society.

Conference Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Conference Starts: January 09, 2020
Conference Ends: January 12, 2020

CFP Submission Deadline: March 18, 2019

For more information, contact: Jayme Stayer






Modernism and Diagnosis (prospective cluster for the M/m Print Plus platform)

This CFP IS NOT for a MSA Conference

“Modernism and Diagnosis” (prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform)

Edited by Lisa Mendelman and Heather A. Love
Proposed titles & abstracts due March 15, 2019
Selected essays due June 15, 2019

We seek proposals for short, provocative essays addressing the topic of “Modernism and Diagnosis” for a prospective peer-reviewed cluster on Modernism/modernity’s Print Plus platform.

The first decades of the twentieth century saw the proliferation of popular and scientific diagnoses. Ushered in by a standardizing culture of physical and mental health, individual and social measures of wellbeing and pathology abound during these years—from psychoanalysis and eugenics to self-help and the physical culture movement. Contemporary cultural productions drew from and commented on this evolving slew of analytics. Think, for example, of the representations of shell-shocked and institutionalized bodies in print, on stage, and on screen; formalist experiments that play with new models of selfhood through stream-of-consciousness narration and (sincere or satiric) primitivist aesthetics; and sweeping social diagnoses like Gertrude Stein’s “you are all a lost generation.”

This Print Plus cluster invites papers that meditate on these period dynamics and their implications for understanding modernism’s legacy. Individual essays might focus on questions of identification, categorization, epistemology, or ontology raised by modernist aesthetics (e.g., “cases,” dialect, primitivism), popularized discourses like psychoanalysis and eugenics, and evolving academic disciplines including psychiatry, sexology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and linguistics. Authors might also engage with the recent turns to cognitive neuroscience and sociology in literary studies, conversations about research methodology, modernist cultures of feeling / affect, and narratives of diagnosis as they pertain to contemporary analytic trends and enduring social categories including race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.

Papers should be inventive, provocative gestures, along the lines of a conference roundtable (2000-3000 words). We particularly welcome submissions that draw on the unique possibilities afforded by the digital setting of the Print Plus platform. Please send a titled, 300-word abstract and a brief biography to lisa.mendelman@menlo.edu and heather.love@uwaterloo.ca by March 15, 2019. 6 to 8 contributors will be invited to submit essays, after which the entire cluster will be sent out for peer review.


Conference Location: n/a, n/a
Conference Starts: June 15, 2019
Conference Ends: June 15, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2019

For more information, contact: Heather Love






'Legacies' of Modernism

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

CFP for MSA Panel Proposal: 'Legacies' of Modernism
General Conference Theme: Upheaval and Reconstruction
Toronto, ON, CA. October 17-20, 2019

Recent critics have turned to literary modernism to explain the characteristics of contemporary literature. Departing from the account that circumscribes modernism to a movement between 1900 and 1930, one situated in the metropoles of Europe, scholars have broadened the meaning of category, allowing for its application to geographically diverse texts written recently. Such a project compels us to trace a lineage between Franz Kafka and J.M. Coetzee, E.M. Forster and Zadie Smith, or involves us in the identification of strategies of irony, defamiliarization and self-reflexivity in the work of J.M. Coetzee, Tayeb Salih, Kazuo Ishiguro, Christopher Okigbo and Zadie Smith. Jahan Ramazani, for instance, argues that there is a convivial connection between the bricolage of modernist poetry and the hybridity of postcolonial poetics. Aarthi Vadde has proposed that modernist form allows for transnational identification, becoming a resource in the hands of postcolonialists, because “concern with the mechanics of form, medium and compositional methods [lead] authors… to think about nations as contingent constructions.”

But post-colonial literary studies has long acknowledged the relative importance of modernism as a resource for tropes and techniques (as when Bill Ashcroft’s seminal text initiated the “writing back” paradigm of literary history), but without conceding contemporary literature entirely to modernism. Similarly, postmodernism in the contemporary novel was often described as a movement that superseded naïve modernist tenets--ones which avowed the possibility of objective understanding or the coherence of subjectivity—with more savvy ones. This panel invites papers who explore the consequences of reframing the relationship between modern and contemporary in terms of “legacy,” “influence” and “connection,” rather than “opposition,” “refusal” or “upheaval.” What does the “continuity” model offer for the reading of contemporary literature? When “expanding” the meaning of modernism, do we implicitly seek to “arraogat[e] intellectual capital to those objects or conditions it (newly) designates” (David James, 2018)? If so, then what value system does our literary history encode?

Please send a 300-word paper proposal and a short biography to Jap-Nanak Makkar (japnanak.makkar@wilkes.edu) by March 5.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 05, 2019

For more information, contact: Jap-Nanak Makkar






Indigenous/Modernist

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Indigenous/Modernist

The recent “global” turn in modernist studies has helped us begin to rethink what it might mean to encounter multiple modernisms on their own terms. There is no question that it has been salutary for the field, even as it has generated a plethora of new challenges and difficult questions. Among those is how the drive for a global – even planetary – conceptions of modernism and modernity collide with the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples and their specific histories and cultural practices? How does global modernism link to petro-capitalist exploitations of Indigenous lands and peoples? How do modernist notions of cosmopolitanism map onto or contravene long-standing Indigenous patterns of trans-/international exchange? Is the expansion of modernism anything more than the offer of an exchange of prestige (the ‘modernist’ label) for postcolonial/settler colonial credibility and recognition? And at what potential expense (or benefit) for ongoing and often violent struggles over Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, and futurity? Is it possible to conceive of transnational, geo, global, or planetary modernisms that are not already compromised by imperialism or (settler) colonialism? And how might substantive engagements with Indigenous and Settler Colonial studies provide potential avenues to begin addressing such questions?

Send 250-word abstracts to Beth Piatote (piatote@berkeley.edu) by 4 March 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Beth Piatote






Indigenous Modernities and Modernisms

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Indigenous Modernities and Modernisms

Marshall Berman’s famous description of modernity in All That is Solid applies to no one so fully as to the Indigenous populations affected by 500 years of global imperialism. Indigenous peoples experienced sweeping change across all aspects of life on a scale and with an intensity unparalleled in Europe and England, or among settler populations around the world. Longstanding lifeways suddenly became “traditions” set against the juggernaut of the new, and a ruthless version of history that consigned Indigenous peoples to the past reframed diverse nation-peoples as “primitive,” “primordial,” “antiquated,” and in all cases “vanishing” … despite the ongoing presence and resistance of Native peoples. Looking east from Indian Country, all that is solid really did appear to be melting into air in what might be considered modernity on meth: a version of the alienation and disorientation so eloquently chronicled by Kafka, Stein, Céline, Eliot and others, but amplified exponentially in terms of intensity, consequences, and lasting impacts for Indigenous nations, peoples, and lands.

Given such hyper-intensive experiences of modernity, differently configured and experienced in diverse times and locales around the world, how did Indigenous writers, artists, intellectuals, and cultural producers respond? Facing the double-bind of racialized discourses of modernist “tradition” and “authenticity,” in what ways and across what venues, mediums, genres, and forms did Indigenous creatives place what Scott Lyons calls their own “x-marks” on modernity? If modernism is understood in one sense as aesthetic responses to the “anxieties” of modernity, what modernisms have emerged from this 500-year maelstrom of chaos, change, dislocation, resistance, resilience, and resurgence? What writers, artists, musicians, filmmakers, radio personalities, and intellectuals have even the expanded parameters of the New Modernist Studies still not taken into account? What ideas of modernism, modernity, and “the modern” have we missed so far, and how have they (and perhaps their erasure) provided the condition of possibility for ever-expanding field of modernist studies? If the history of modernity is also the history of Western imperialism and ongoing settler colonialism, how might an honest, sustained engagement with Indigenous modernisms and modernities—however defined—transform the field’s terms, scope, and objects of study?

Send 250-word abstracts to Kirby Brown (kbrown@uoregon.edu) by 4 March 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Kirby Brown






Representing Indigeneity in Modernism

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference


Representing Indigeneity in Modernism

From Juan Rulfo to Joseph Conrad, from Solomon Plaatje to Albert Wendt, and from Tayeb Salih to Pramoedya Ananta Toer, modernist writers make widely varied uses of Indigenous characters in their novels. At the same time, Indigenous writers of the period—from Simon Pokagon, E. Pauline Johnson, Alexander Posey, and Zitkala-Sa to Charles Eastman, John Joseph Mathews, Mourning Dove, and D’Arcy McNickle—deliver powerful critiques of euroamerican “character” across a wide array of genres and forms. Read together, how are such figures variously represented, and what can we learn about modernist politics from those representations? If understood as figurative contact zones, how can we understand the nature of the encounters they record? Are there salient differences in how European, English, or American writers represent Indigenous populations, versus how Indigenous writers represent themselves or their euroamerican counterparts? Are most such representations tied inextricably to the imperialist ideologies still thriving in the early twentieth century,or are there avant-garde, experimental, and/or Indigenous-centered approaches that fundamentally disrupt the logics and politics of imperialist-colonialist expansion? What might such representations have to teach us about the apparently inextricable link between modernism and imperialism?

Send 250-word abstracts to Stephen Ross (saross@uvic.ca) by 4 March 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Stephen Ross






Roundtable: the Modernisms of 1919

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

MSA 2019: Toronto

What are the modernisms of 1919? On this centenary of the 1919 Peace Conference, this roundtable seeks to ask our understanding of postwar modernism changes if we put the moment of 1919 at its center. Who are the men and women of 1919, at the center or in the peripheries of the liberal postwar settlement? What are the poetics and the politics particular to this reconstructive moment? How does our notion of the \"postwar\" change if we shift our focus to colonized and semicolonial modernities, to the creation of the vast Mandate territories, to the invasion and occupation of Haiti, to the revolutionary experiments in Münich and Fiume? How does the liberal settlement of 1919 shape modernist notions of human rights, refugee settlement, racial hierarchy, imperial control, sovereignty and debt? How might we integrate the May Fourth Movement in Chinese literary and political modernity into our historical accounts? What are the lasting effects of the upheavals and reconstructions of 1919 for literary modernities inside and outside the precincts of the Great War?

This roundtable seeks position papers, not full papers, that develop an argument about how to situate particular writers, texts, or literary traditions within the literary historiography of 1919, either in relation to particular local and national histories or within a broad world history.

Abstract of 250 words or less to ghankin@clemson.edu by March 4th 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Gabriel Hankins






Indigenous Avant Gardes

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Indigenous Avant-gardes

For many Indigenous peoples around the world, modernity begins in 1492, and remains inextricable from the predations of global imperialist expansion. Perhaps more than any other people anywhere on earth, Indigenous people have experienced the full force of modernity as a sweeping set of changes across their cultures and with unprecedented speed. At the same time, Indigenous peoples have been locked into tightly-constrained notions of tradition and custom that would seem to put their cultural productions at odds with concepts like the avant-garde.

This panel seeks to challenge such conceptions and to ask how have the particular modernities experienced by Indigenous people around the world have generated particular modernisms. How have they produced avant-garde practices? How might such works constitute a parallel or alternative to Anglo-European avant-gardes? How have they informed or been appropriated by them? How do they break with – or simply reject – canonical modernist aesthetics? What are the politics of such breaks, and how do they record the rapidly progressing modernities faced by Indigenous peoples around the world?

Send 250-word abstracts to Jonathan Radocay (jradocay@ucdavis.edu) by 4 March 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Jonathan Radocay






Derivative Modernisms

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Derivative Modernisms


Just how wide is modernism’s debt to Indigenous cultural practices? We all know that Picasso stole freely from African masks in developing his cubist aesthetic, but what other such thefts have remained hidden from view? What writers “borrowed” from Indigenous narrative contents and techniques without attribution? Which sculptors made Indigenous uses of volume and plane their own (lookin’ at you, Pompon!)? Which painters adapted Indigenous designs for apparently avant-garde results in the European setting? More broadly, how did settler government policies create the conditions of possibility for modernist experimentation and innovation? How is the politics of removal encoded in modernism’s aesthetic fireworks? Exactly how Indigenous is modernist aesthetics?

This panel proceeds from the deep suspicion that a great many more Indigenous influences shaped modernist aesthetics than have been acknowledged thus far. We seek papers that excavate such influences, with the aim of restoring credit to the borrowed-from. At the same time, we seek papers that expand the remit of modernism to include its elided Indigenous sources.



Send 250-word abstracts to Stephen Ross (saross@uvic.ca) by 4 March 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Stephen Ross






Modernism, Disaster, and Nothingness

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

In his essay “The Literature of Nihilism” (1966), Paul de Man argues that “A literature of nihilism is not necessarily nihilistic.” While this idea may seem like a contradiction—indeed, what is nihilism if not nihilistic? —it raises an important issue. Even though a text calls to mind themes or images that are usually associated with nihilism—nothingness, despair, empty space—it does not mean that the text falls prey to an utterly empty conception of the idea. Furthermore, in The Writing of the Disaster (1980), Maurice Blanchot states that “the disaster ruins everything, all while leaving everything intact.” Drawing upon these concepts, this panel invokes the conference theme of “Upheaval and Reconstruction” by interrogating modernism’s interaction with the generative capacity of the ultimate “nihil.” How do we approach the nihil through disaster, and once we arrive at that point, what do we do? How do modernists use images of nothingness as spaces for creation? What clues are left not only in authors’ works but also in historical/biographical accounts that support modernity’s generative proclivity in the face of such turmoil? How do modernists talk about “nothing”?

This panel welcomes inter-disciplinary conversation, including papers that investigate modernist literature, art, history and/or philosophy, to further contextually examine the influences that might otherwise challenge contemporary notions of modernism’s complex struggle with conflict, anguish, and renewal. Some possible approaches include destruction as a mode for creation, modernism and nihilism, annihilation and sublime existence, and accidental versus deliberate destruction and creation.

Please send a brief paper proposal (250-300 words) and bio to Elysia Balavage (ecbalava@uncg.edu) by March 4, 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Elysia Balavage






Observing Upheaval: Modernism and Surveillance

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Observing Upheaval: Modernism and Surveillance
Organisers: Stephanie J Brown and Emily Hainze

Panel description:
This panel explores the relationship between modernism and forms of surveillance the emerged during the modernist period. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw the rehearsal of bureaucratic state power throughout empire and its consolidation in Western states. Our panel queries how different media forms, working at scales that vary from the compactness of the lyric, the photograph, and the case file to the expansiveness of the census, the sociological study, and the ordinance survey, registered emerging surveillance culture. How did they experiment with, produce, and undermine the boundaries of knowledge practices that aimed to manage populations and lives, and to reinforce intersecting hierarchies of class, race, gender, and sexuality?

The panel organizers are particularly interested in papers that engage with:

-The circulation of surveillance practices across sites/borders/boundaries
-Sousveillance as an individual or communal practice within modernity
-Andrea Mubi Brighenti’s notion of “artveillance”
-Institutional surveillance practices and/in public discourse
-Surveillance as productive of embodied and/or affective experiences
-The archives of modernism via recent work on surveillance, policing and race such as Simone Browne’s Dark Matters (2015), Jackie Wang’s Carceral Capitalism (2018) and Saidiya Hartman’s Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (2019)
-Emergent surveillance forms in the modernist period
-Surveillance aesthetics
-Wartime surveillance at home and abroad
-Sites of surveillance as culturally productive
-Work on sites or practices of surveillance not commonly recognized as such
-Surveillance and modernist biopolitics
-Surveillance and culture(s) of policing, covert versus overt surveillance practices
-Intersections between surveillance practices and anti-colonial art/activism or resistance to the state
-Self-surveillance as cultural production
-Opting in: mass obs and similar projects
-Surveillance and modernist discourses of privacy
-Modernist self-censorship as internalized surveillance
-New methods for reading surveillance archives
-Pre-histories of contemporary surveillance practice, technology, or concerns

To those interested, please send a brief abstract (250-300 words) and bio to both Steph Brown (stephbrown@email.arizona.edu) and Emily Hainze (ehainze@bu.edu ) by March 2.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 02, 2019

For more information, contact: Steph Brown






Echoes of Earlier Avant-garde Anti-normative Discourses in Contemporary Drama

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

In the last decades, increasing numbers of scholarly works have recognized the discursive violence of Dadaist, Surrealist, and Expressionist theatre as an ethically motivated attack meant to question the function, purpose, and cultural value of representational (“traditional”) art in light of what Avant-garde artists saw as its participation in a regime of signs that offered tacit, implicit support to controlling or repressive state structures, culminating in the horror of the first, and then the second World Wars. The same argument has been made concerning a number of experimental dramas produced in the aftermath of the second World War, with many commentators beginning to emphasize substantial similarities between these dramas and earlier Avant-garde works in terms of their use of destabilizing language operations, construction of a subject lacking organicity, and denunciation of the mechanisms of containment and repression that can transform reason into its exploitative-genocidal opposite (nationalism, racism, violent heteronormativity, colonialism, militarism, religious extremism, etc.).
This panel seeks papers that explore connections between earlier Avant-garde anti-normative discourses and late twentieth-century/ contemporary drama, with the purpose of emphasizing the emergence of increasingly intense imaginary investments in equality and the elimination of systemic exploitation and repression over the last 100 years of theatrical production.
Please send 300-500-word proposals to Cristina Ionica (Fanshawe College), cristina_ionica@yahoo.com

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Cristina Ionica






Logics of Conflict in 20th Century Women’s Drama

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

In Excitable Speech, Judith Butler proposes a chiasmatic model for the understanding of conflict, as she analyzes the role of injurious speech in relating injury (socially contingent and avoidable) and subordination or subjection (the constitutive condition of the subject). Using a theoretical framework that combines elements of Lacanian, Althusserian, and Foucauldian critical discourse, Butler explores the possibilities of resistance available to the actors involved in a situation of conflict and concludes that none of the various regimes of normalization, subordination and subjection surrounding the individual at any given moment can ensure the individual’s complete, infallible subjection insofar as both the individual and these regimes of signs are, in some ways, “excitable,” unstable entities.
Considering the centrality of the notions of performativity and performance to Butler’s theorization of subjection, as well as Lacan’s definition of the “woman” position as a “not wholly there” in the domain of phallic control, this panel seeks critical and theoretical explorations of the ways in which various logics of conflict (family/ intergenerational, war-related, environmental, class/ gender/ race-based, etc.) are represented in twentieth-century/ contemporary women’s drama. An extended discussion of the themes, linguistic conventions, affective states, and body language that emerge consistently from these representations of conflict should allow for interesting conclusions concerning the ways in which various logics of conflict intersect in contemporary women’s drama and reflect on changing social realities. Many such works re-imagine, redefine, and confront conflict in ways that accentuate its chiasmatic composition to further destabilize its destructive potential. In a world of ever-morphing and often volatile socio-political realities, the import of approaches to conflict that can sidestep the constraints of more traditional models of conflict resolution extends beyond the physical limits of the stage, reaffirming the value of theatre as a transformative social experience.
Please send your proposals (300-500 words) to Cristina Ionica (Fanshawe College), cristina_ionica@yahoo.com.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Cristina Ionica






"Tradition and the Individual Talent" at 100

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

This panel invites scholars to reflect on the meaning and significance of T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent" (1919) to mark the centenary of its first publication. In keeping with the conference theme, it welcomes papers that address Eliot's writerly attempt to uphold tradition as a natural response to the historical upheavals of this tumultuous time. Beyond that, however, it asks scholars to grapple with the critical legacy of Eliot's landmark essay, which promoted the widespread tendency to read modernism as a narrative about the depersonalization of literature. It further encourages them to consider how this seminal text laid the groundwork for many subsequent critical approaches (from New Criticism to post-structuralism to more recent engagements with form) and artistic movements (from Imagism to concrete poetry to autofiction). Please send a 300-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Alexander McKee at abmckee@udel.edu by March 1, 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Alexander McKee






Upheavals and Affect: Politics and Methods

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

“But modernism’s longevity,” David James reminds us in his recent article, “may also disclose certain critical impulses that arguably say just as much about the affective energies of championing modernism’s terminological adaptability as about the precise aesthetic, historical, or ideological anatomy of modernism’s myriad practices and remediations” (“Modernism’s Contemporary Affects”). As the new modernist studies garners increasingly concentrated attention to affect—from Charles Altieri’s The Particulars of Rapture (2003) and Sianne Ngai’s Ugly Feelings (2005) to Julia Taylor’s edited volume Modernism and Affect (2015), Modernism/modernity’s special issue on weak theory and weak modernism (2018), and the Modernism/modernity Print Plus cluster “Modernism’s Contemporary Affects” (2018)—this panel invokes the conference theme by calling for rigorous investigations into the disruption affect brings to both literary representation and our interpretive practice. What do we talk about when we talk about modernism’s “affect”? In a field often defined by its troublingly obstinate resistance to exposition and the multifarious demands, shocks, and obfuscation faced by its readership, can affect provide us with more dynamic modes of critical inquiry into the hermeneutical slipperiness of modernism? How do we reconcile the tension between the epistemological uncontainablity of affect and the methodological demands of modernist studies? What theoretical reformulations of affect and interpretation do we need if we want to take into account our affective entanglement and ideological alignment with modernism\'s affect? What are the revolutionary and reactionary politics of modernism’s affect and our reading methods? How do we understand modernism’s affect in relation to the historical and social production of affect as partaking in commodity fetishism and ideological apparatuses?

To those interested, please send a brief abstract (250-300 words) and bio to both Kevin Tunnicliffe (ktunni@uvic.ca) and Amy Tang (yantang@uvic.ca).

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Kevin Tunnicliffe and Amy Tang






Making the Stones Speak: First World War Memorials

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

War memorials, whether elegiac or heroic, attempt to give physical form to aspects of national character and memory forged by war. However, they also embody tensions between private grief and public commemoration, the silence of loss and the necessity of public speech and symbolism that can assign meaning to that loss. Moreover, because war memorials must answer to varied demands—those of a nation or city, veterans, mourners, artists, planning commissions, and communities—they are very often sites of social and aesthetic contestation.

This panel aims to explore WWI memorialization in the form of statues, monuments, buildings, cemeteries and installations, both in the immediate aftermath of the war and more recently. Papers might consider the tensions within war memorials between permanence and impermanence, stone and flesh, presence and absence, abstraction and figuration, or the interplay of silent stone with the “speaking” of inscriptions, dedicatory speeches or poems, or literary or cinematic representations of memorials. Papers that consider the exclusion of certain groups from commemoration, memorial structures as sites of protest or mourning, or centenary installations or structures are also welcome. Papers may take any of various disciplinary perspectives—art historical, architectural, historical, literary, cinematic--and focus on any national or transnational context.

Please send a 250-word abstract and brief bio to Stacy Hubbard at sch1@buffalo.edu by March 1st.


Conference Location: Toronto, CA
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Stacy Hubbard






CFP Modernist Legacies and Futures: Modernist Studies Ireland inaugural conference

This CFP IS NOT for a MSA Conference

Modernist Legacies and Futures: Modernist Studies Ireland inaugural conference

Friday 17th May 2019

National University of Ireland Galway

Plenary Speaker: Dr Ben Levitas, Goldsmiths University of London

In many ways, Modernism’s future is now. We are still grappling with modernism’s aftermath, afterlives, and its perpetual relevance. The new textualities and ephemera available to scholars today make it increasingly important to reconsider how creative figures conceived and constructed their future both within their work and in the material cultures they occupied.

The increasing digitisation of cultural materials is reshaping how we interact and understand modernist practice. Archives, newspapers, periodicals, and digital critical editions are allowing scholars to read, see, or listen to the cultural atmospheres of modernity, whilst reading texts anew with digital analysis technologies. Modernism was a movement marked by a dynamic play with concepts of time and temporality. This forged both a sense of periodicity and a moment of crisis in expressing the present and perceiving the future. The study of plural, reterritorialised modernisms and the growing body of available materials opens up new avenues for understanding how and why modernism came into being through artists, publishers, academics, and institutions. The corpus of modernist studies is expanding rapidly and this expansion includes materials that we also create. The aesthetic politics of neomodernism and protomodernism continues to pose questions regarding the remaking and influence modernist practice has today.

The inaugural conference of Modernist Studies Ireland, ‘Modernist Legacies and Futures’ seeks to bring together Irish and international scholars to initiate an exchange and review of current research, trends, and findings in modernist studies. We ask scholars to consider how modernists created or negated the future in their work? Did modernist artists conceive of the future as a prerequisite of the work itself and, if so, how did they attempt to secure their legacy? What does the digital landscape achieve for modernism studies? What future does modernist studies have? If modernism was a radical attempt to reshape culture and art did it succeed and how can we as scholars perpetuate this radicalism? Do current attempts to democratise the study of literature and unsettle canonicity impact future research? What modernisms are missing from the field of modernist study? What does modernism mean to minority languages, cultures, and to a non-western canon?

We invite contributions for 20-minute papers on themes such as, but not limited to:

- Modernist aesthetics and futurity
- Time and temporality
- Age, ageing, and youth
- Vision and revision
- Collaborative acts and interdisciplinary practice
- Modernist editing and the legacy of ‘the work’
- Periodical and print networks
- Minor’ literatures or non-Anglophone modernisms Modernism in the digital humanities
- Gendered and queer modernisms
- Metamodernism and neomodernism
- Historicising or geo-politicising modernisms and modernities
- Space and representation
- Modernism in and of media
- Transnational and global modernisms
- Modernist afterlives and futures
- Modernist (im-)possibilities, utopias, dystopias
- Pedagogy and modernist studies
- Archives, databases, and digital collections
- Editing and publishing histories
- Canon formation and redefinition


Please submit an abstract and brief biography by 5pm, Feb 28th 2019

For further information please contact: modstudiesireland@gmail.com

Modernist Studies Ireland (MSI) is a new organisation that aims to facilitate the sharing of interests, research, and pedagogical approaches to modernism and modernity in the Republic and Northern Ireland. Modernist Studies Ireland provides a network to communicate our new research, publications, and archival holdings to a local and global audience.

Further information on the initiative can be found here: https://worksinprogressnuig.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @Mod_Ireland

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/modernistireland/



Conference Location: Galway, Ireland
Conference Starts: May 17, 2019
Conference Ends: May 17, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019

For more information, contact: Gaby Fletcher






CFP MSA 2019, Toronto: Popular Modernisms: Forms, Genres, Sub-Genres

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Over the past twenty years, modernist scholars have productively interrogated, probed, and disassembled the “great divide” between modernism and popular culture. This panel seeks to continue that work by examining intersections, exchanges, disjunctions, and conflicts between modernism and popular forms of cultural production. Panelists might examine major popular cultural forms such as adventure tales, crime fiction, comic strips, science fiction, Hollywood films, radio plays, Jazz music, etc., or any popular cultural sub-genres such as fairy tale fantasy, how to books, romance pulps, esoteric magazines, animal comics, picture books, time-travel romances, Romans à clef, ghost stories, proletarian fiction, etc. etc.

Please send paper abstracts of 350-500 words and brief bio-bibliographical statements by February 28 to Paul Peppis: ppeppis@uoregon.edu.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019

For more information, contact: Paul Peppis






Mediation, the Urban, and Cultural Memory

This CFP IS for a MSA Conference

Title: “Mediation, the Urban, and Cultural Memory”

Friedrich Kittler famously claimed that the city was the quintessential space of modernity in its spatial capacity as a “medium” for data storage, exchange, and processing. Kittler argued that to explore how various “mediums” store, exchange, and process cultural memory can help us understand how those in the early twentieth-century responded to the anxiety surrounding what Walter Benjamin described as the increasing loss of shared memory. This panel proposes to explore representations of media (broadly conceived) and mediation in an urban setting as part of a response to modernity’s threat to established tradition. This media can range from the “old” new media such as telegraphy, photography, and cinema to urban infrastructure such as “water supply, electricity, highways” (Kittler) that supply the energy needed in order for information to circulate. Paper topics could include, but need not be limited to, studies of works, genres, or forms that facilitate memorialization, or analysis on modernist representations or discourses on media’s role in enhancing or destabilizing memory. Please send a 300-word abstract of your proposed paper and a short bio to JiHae Koo (kooji@iu.edu) by February 24, 2019.


Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 24, 2019

For more information, contact: JiHae Koo