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Politics of Fear,Politics of Hope: Postcritique and Joseph Conrad


\"Politics of Fear, Politics of Hope: Postcritique and Joseph Conrad” <br /> <br />We are seeking essay proposals for an edited volume focusing on Conrad’s politics in relation to ideas of fear and/or hope. The postcritical turn encourages us to consider what literature does in the world—the social, emotional, and political effects of reading. The last two MLA panels organized by the Joseph Conrad Society of America reflect this approach: Conrad’s Politics of Fear in 2018 and Conrad’s Politics of Hope in 2019. Both panels examined Conrad’s texts in relation to recent events, offering new perspectives on literature’s contribution to political understanding. <br /> <br />For this volume we are particularly interested in essays that use Conrad’s writing to engage with postcritique, either constructively or critically, or that in other ways reflect Conrad’s continuing relevance today. <br /> <br />Essay proposals should be 250-300 words, accompanied by a brief CV. Essays will be 5000-7000 words, including notes and citations. Please email proposals and CVs to both jayparker@hsu.edu.hk and Jwexler@luc.edu by March 30. Accepted authors will be notified by 30 May and invited to submit completed essays by 1 January 2020. Please note that final acceptance will be confirmed upon receipt of the finished version of the essay. <br />

Conference Location: Chicago, United States
Conference Starts: February 12, 2019
Conference Ends: March 30, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2019

For more information, contact: Joyce P Wexler

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MLA 2020: Pacific Pound


Call For Papers: MLA Convention, Seattle 2020 <br />The Ezra Pound Society Panel <br />'Pacific Pound' <br /> <br />The Atlantic Ocean has served as a primary transit zone of cultural production and critical response for much of the history of Modernism Studies. More recently the field has sought to expand its focus to other regions, nations, and modes of literary and artistic expression in an attempt to chart a more inclusive model for what Modernism Studies can be. How might such an enterprise shape the reception of Ezra Pound – an author long positioned at or near the centre of the Modernist canon – and how might a reorientation to the Pacific Ocean provide new insights into his work and influence? Pound Studies has long taken seriously his engagements with China and Japan, but new work still needs to be done on his relation to other Pacific zones such as Australia, South America, and South-East Asia. What might we make of Pound’s occlusion of New Zealand, Polynesia and South-East Asia in light of his tendencies toward encyclopaedism? How might Pound be reconsidered in light of the rise (and perhaps the eclipse) of the Pacific Rim as a geopolitical and geoliterary concept? Papers will be considered that seek to address any of these questions or related questions that take the Pacific and its region(s), including China and Japan, as a point of departure for Pound’s poetry, prose, personal and professional affiliations, or influence. <br /> <br />Please send 250-word proposals and a short biographical statement by 20 March to Mark Byron at mark.byron@sydney.edu.au. <br /> <br />MARK BYRON is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Sydney and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow. His current project, Modernism and the Early Middle Ages, has thus far produced the monograph Ezra Pound\'s Eriugena (London: Bloomsbury, 2014) and a dossier co-edited with Stefano Rosignoli on Samuel Beckett and the Middle Ages in the Journal of Beckett Studies 25.1 (2016). Mark has edited Ezra Pound’s and Olga Rudge’s The Blue Spill with Sophia Barnes (London: Bloomsbury, 2019), and the forthcoming essay collection The New Ezra Pound Studies (Cambridge, 2019). He is the current President of the Ezra Pound Society. <br />

Conference Location: Seattle, United States
Conference Starts: January 09, 2020
Conference Ends: January 12, 2020

CFP Submission Deadline: March 20, 2019

For more information, contact: Mark Byron

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MLA 2020: T. S. Eliot and Identity/Politics


Call for Papers: MLA Convention <br />International T. S. Eliot Society panel at MLA Convention, Seattle 2020 <br /> <br />“T. S. Eliot: Identity / Politics” <br /> <br />The phrase “identity politics” has become as highly charged as the phrase “politically correct”—more often deployed today as an invitation to attack or defend some group or form of affiliation. For the 2020 MLA in Seattle, the International T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor a panel that recognizes the power of the phrase and the importance of all that it points toward, but we intend to avoid the merely reactive, accusatory and defensive postures that often attend its use. <br /> <br />To that end, we encourage prospective panelists to pause and weigh each term carefully, thinking about how they are and are not necessarily connected. By means of the slash between the two nouns—Identity / Politics—we signal this emphasis on keeping each term lively and mobile, as proximate but also as distinct as possible. Questions that papers for this panel might address include: <br /> <br />* How have Eliot\'s own politics been reassessed and our understanding of his positions been made more nuanced with the release of so much new material in the Letters, Poems and Complete Prose? <br /> <br />* How does Eliot\'s \"mind of Europe\" speak to recent European politics: e.g. the Scottish independence movement, Brexit, the rise of the far right and nationalist politics in France, Hungary, and elsewhere? Does Eliot’s politically oriented writing of the 1930s and 1940s, in particular, prove relevant to thoughts about totalitarianism and authoritarianism today? (This writing includes his letters as well as his published and unpublished essays and, of course, the drama and poetry.) <br /> <br />* How do Eliot\'s notions of identity or sexual / gender politics, whether in his critical prose pieces or in such poems as The Waste Land, speak to our current cultural moment? Such a discussion might take up transgender rights; queer practice and identity; the construction of femininity; the construction of the racial, sexual Other in Eliot\'s work. <br /> <br />* What are Eliot\'s thoughts on American language and literature? Is there an American identity expressed in the languages of its people; might there be a politics corresponding to the languages of those peoples? <br /> <br />* Does genre in Eliot have aspects that might be considered under the identity / politics rubric? We suggest that his extensive speculations about and practices of art in different genres are not only matters of aesthetic experimentation but do invoke and address aspects of experience that fall under both sides of our panel’s title. <br /> <br />Send a 300-word abstract, plus a brief bio, by March 18 to John Whittier-Ferguson at johnaw@umich.edu. <br /> <br />John Whittier-Ferguson is a professor in the English Department at the University of Michigan, where he\'s been since 1990. During the academic year 2017-2018 he served as a visiting professor at the United States Air Force Academy. His most recent book, Mortality and Form in Late Modernist Literature, was published by Cambridge in the fall of 2015. He is the author of Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound (Oxford, 1996), and co-editor, with A. Walton Litz and Richard Ellmann, of James Joyce: Poems and Shorter Writings (Faber 1991). He is the Vice President of the International T. S. Eliot Society.

Conference Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Conference Starts: January 09, 2020
Conference Ends: January 12, 2020

CFP Submission Deadline: March 18, 2019

For more information, contact: Jayme Stayer

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Genre in a Time of Literary Modernism


Genre in a Time of Literary Modernism <br /> <br />This panel invites papers that consider how genre fiction informed the reception and/or production of literary modernism and vice versa. Are certain genres more amenable to a modernist treatment than others? <br /> <br />Papers discussing any aspect of this relationship are welcomed. <br /> <br />Deadline for submissions: Monday, 18 March 2019 <br /> <br />Please send submissions to Garrett Bruen at garrettbruenphd@gmail.com.

Conference Location: Seattle, USA
Conference Starts: January 09, 2020
Conference Ends: January 12, 2020

CFP Submission Deadline: March 18, 2019

For more information, contact: Garrett Bruen

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Modernism and Diagnosis (prospective cluster for the M/m Print Plus platform)


“Modernism and Diagnosis” (prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform) <br /> <br />Edited by Lisa Mendelman and Heather A. Love <br />Proposed titles & abstracts due March 15, 2019 <br />Selected essays due June 15, 2019 <br /> <br />We seek proposals for short, provocative essays addressing the topic of “Modernism and Diagnosis” for a prospective peer-reviewed cluster on Modernism/modernity’s Print Plus platform. <br /> <br />The first decades of the twentieth century saw the proliferation of popular and scientific diagnoses. Ushered in by a standardizing culture of physical and mental health, individual and social measures of wellbeing and pathology abound during these years—from psychoanalysis and eugenics to self-help and the physical culture movement. Contemporary cultural productions drew from and commented on this evolving slew of analytics. Think, for example, of the representations of shell-shocked and institutionalized bodies in print, on stage, and on screen; formalist experiments that play with new models of selfhood through stream-of-consciousness narration and (sincere or satiric) primitivist aesthetics; and sweeping social diagnoses like Gertrude Stein’s “you are all a lost generation.” <br /> <br />This Print Plus cluster invites papers that meditate on these period dynamics and their implications for understanding modernism’s legacy. Individual essays might focus on questions of identification, categorization, epistemology, or ontology raised by modernist aesthetics (e.g., “cases,” dialect, primitivism), popularized discourses like psychoanalysis and eugenics, and evolving academic disciplines including psychiatry, sexology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and linguistics. Authors might also engage with the recent turns to cognitive neuroscience and sociology in literary studies, conversations about research methodology, modernist cultures of feeling / affect, and narratives of diagnosis as they pertain to contemporary analytic trends and enduring social categories including race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. <br /> <br />Papers should be inventive, provocative gestures, along the lines of a conference roundtable (2000-3000 words). We particularly welcome submissions that draw on the unique possibilities afforded by the digital setting of the Print Plus platform. Please send a titled, 300-word abstract and a brief biography to lisa.mendelman@menlo.edu and heather.love@uwaterloo.ca by March 15, 2019. 6 to 8 contributors will be invited to submit essays, after which the entire cluster will be sent out for peer review. <br />

Conference Location: n/a, n/a
Conference Starts: June 15, 2019
Conference Ends: June 15, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2019

For more information, contact: Heather Love

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MLA 2020 - It's All Relative: Modernism and Science


It’s All Relative: Modernism and Science <br /> <br />2020 MLA Convention, Seattle <br /> <br />This guaranteed panel will consider how advances in math, science, and technology reshaped the literary imagination of writers during the long modernist period, as well as how the philosophical outlooks that were influenced by or in conversation with these advances interacted with that literary imagination. The modernist period was a time of great discovery in arenas that affected both the texture of daily lived life and also conceptions of humans’ place in the universe as well as the shape and workings of the universe itself. The first quarter of the 20th century alone witnessed monumental advances in fields as diverse as transportation, nuclear physics, and astrophysics; the Wright brothers took flight, Ernest Rutherford proved the structure of the nucleus, and Edward Hubble discovered galaxies outside of our Milky Way. Scholars are, of course, aware that such advances constitute an important part of the intellectual context for modernist writing. Our aim here is to consider whether previously unexplored connections or ideas link specific aspects of this developing outlook to modernists and/or modernism. <br /> <br />We thus seek proposals that consider how these advances in scientific thinking—which across the 19th and 20th centuries dialogued ever more closely with philosophy—opened new spaces in the artistic mind, allowing for innovative fantastical imagining, unprecedented metaphysical and ontological contemplation, and a redefining of traditional binaries, such as possible/impossible. Like many of his near contemporaries, Luigi Pirandello’s novels and plays appear to be the fruit of an intellect that was steeped in and colored by current scientific progress. How were writers like Pirandello influenced by science? And what can we learn by considering their work in relation to these great strides in the scientific realm? <br /> <br />With this notion in mind, we are interested in topics such as (but not limited to) the following: <br /> <br />Modernism and: <br />• The micro (nuclear) <br />• The macro (cosmological) <br />• The impossible <br />• The invisible real <br />• The movement of bodies and energy <br />• Conceptions of materialism <br />• Intellectual history <br />• Math <br />• Electrical illumination <br />• Flight <br />• Relativity <br />• New conceptions of evolution <br /> <br />This guaranteed session is sponsored by the Pirandello Society of America. However, we encourage submissions not only on Pirandello but on any pertinent modernist figure(s), movement(s), or text(s) relevant to the panel topics. <br /> <br />Abstracts of ~300 words and short bios should be sent to Julianne VanWagenen (vanwagen@umich.edu) and Michael Subialka (msubialka@ucdavis.edu) by March 13, 2019. <br /> <br />This is a guaranteed panel for the 2020 MLA Convention in Seattle (January 9-12, 2020), sponsored by the Pirandello Society of America. <br />

Conference Location: Seattle, USA
Conference Starts: January 09, 2020
Conference Ends: January 12, 2020

CFP Submission Deadline: March 13, 2019

For more information, contact: Michael Subialka

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Refuge, Upheaval, and Modernist Cultures of Welcoming


As a flexible model of welcoming, hospitality—that process of inviting one into a shared space or sharing in the space of another—found purchase throughout modern culture, and much of modernist literature returns repeatedly to its everyday matters, structures, and locales. From French sitting-rooms and English coffee houses to Irish céilí and Calcuttan adda, both the formal locations and informal gatherings of modernist hospitality provided spaces of refuge for experimental ideas and non-normative identities, especially those marginalized by the homogenizing processes of modernity. That the practical realities of welcoming almost always failed to live up to their ethical ideal, however, was a lesson many modernists either encountered firsthand or themselves introduced through exclusionary practices and prohibitive social rules. Hospitality, after all, sometimes masks or exposes a subject’s anxieties about certain power relations—the pressure to perform as a perfect host or hostess, for example, often upends hospitality, engendering its obverse, inhospitality, and thus lending hospitality the quality of an unattainable, impossible ideal. For many modernist writers and modern citizens, the places of everyday hospitality became inhospitable scenes of social or cultural upheaval as often as hospitable locations of refuge. <br /> <br /> However, this panel hopes to highlight modernism’s more diverse and fruitful cultures of welcoming, wherever they might be found. Because despite their failures, many modernist authors endeavored to make, unmake, and remake sites of upheaval and inhospitality through productive Other-centered logics, often doing so at scale, from quotidian hospitable performances, to practical salons and transient cityscapes, to ostensibly idealistic markers of nationhood and empire. Many of those efforts certainly smuggled in normative or imperialist notions under the guise of community-building, but this panel seeks paper proposals that consider those successful cases less attended to, that reflect modernists’ varied and generative ways of making modern contact new and newly meaningful, of offering access to a modern everyday that dominant social realities otherwise rejected to marginalized ways-of-being. <br /> <br />To those interested, please send brief abstracts and bios to Sean Weidman (sgweidman@psu.edu) and Daniel Hengel (danielhengel@gmail.com) by March 7th.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 07, 2019

For more information, contact: Sean Weidman

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MSA 2019: Autobiografiction and Fascism


Max Sanders argues in Self Impression: Life-Writing, Autobiografiction, and the Forms of Modern Literature (2010) that a novel engagement of auto/biography and fiction (what he calls autobiografiction) marks Modernism—a line of argument that Jerome Boyd Maunsell’s more recent Portraits from Life (2017) also advances. During the moment between 1870 and 1930 where Sanders sees autobiografiction emerging in the realm of aesthetic, though, a new political form is also coming into being—Fascism—whose leaders write their own autobiografiction to promote their ideology (Hitler’s Mein Kampf, Mussolini’s My Autobiography). Indeed, the anti-Fascist Piero Gobetti underscores the interrelation of fascism and the literary form by declaring Mussolini’s regime to be nothing less than the “autobiography of the nation.” This panel asks us to think about the relationship between modernist autobiography, autobiographical fiction, and fascism—what is the relationship between these forms of construction (and destruction)? <br /> <br />There were many modernists who employed autobiographical writing to contest Fascism—Christopher Isherwood’s Berlin Stories, Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas, Thomas Wolfe’s The Web and the Rock, and Walter Benjamin’s entire autobiographical corpus (as Gerhard Richter (2000) argues), to name just a few. However, these texts are deeply anxious about the influence of fascism on their own form. Klaus Theweleit’s classic work, Male Fantasies (1989), which takes as its object of study the autobiografiction of the Freikorps, suggests through the very proliferation of its sources that there might be something in the genre’s nature that lends itself to fascism—or something about fascism that demands this sort of writing. Most recently, the autobiografiction of Karl Ove Knaussgaard makes explicit the concern that such writing might retain fascist traces by taking as its name My Struggle. <br /> <br />This panel, then, seeks papers that engage this anxiety and hold modernist aesthetics and politics next to each other to consider the formal, thematic, and/or historical relations between autobiography and fascism. How, after all, does modernist autobiography engage fascism? And how might fascism inform modernist autobiography? <br /> <br />Some suggested topics: <br />*Autobiography and aura <br />*Readings of Isherwood, Wolfe, Woolf, Benjamin, Wright <br />*Readings of fascist life-writing <br />*Readings of anti-fascist life-writing <br />*Reading modernist post-WWII memoir (e.g. Gunter Grass’s Peeling of the Onion) <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief bio to sanders.bernstein@gmail.com by March 6, 2019. <br /> <br />***This is a CFP for a panel for MSA 20, October 17-20, 2019 in Toronto, CA**** <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, CA
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 06, 2019

For more information, contact: Sanders Bernstein

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'Legacies' of Modernism


CFP for MSA 2019 Panel Proposal: 'Legacies' of Modernism <br />Conference Theme: “Upheaval and Reconstruction” <br />Event Location and Dates: Toronto, ON, CA. October 17-20, 2019 <br /> <br />Recent critics have turned to literary modernism to explain certain formal characteristics of contemporary literature. Departing from definitional constraints that would date modernism to the early twentieth century or situate it in the metropoles of Europe, scholars have broadened the meaning of category, allowing for its application to geographically diverse texts written recently. Such a project compels us trace a lineage between Franz Kafka and J.M. Coetzee, E.M. Forster and Zadie Smith, or involves us in the identification of strategies of irony, defamiliarization and self-reflexivity in the work of Tayeb Salih, Kazuo Ishiguro, Christopher Okigbo and Michelle Cliff. Jahan Ramazani, for instance, argues that there is a convivial connection between the bricolage of modernist poetry and the hybridity of postcolonial poetics. Aarthi Vadde has proposed that modernist form allows for transnational identification, becoming a resource in the hands of postcolonialists, because “concern with the mechanics of form, medium and compositional methods [lead] authors… to think about nations as contingent constructions.” <br /> <br />But postcolonial literary studies has long acknowledged the relative importance of modernism as a resource for tropes and techniques (as when Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Hellen Tiffin’s seminal text initiated the “writing back” paradigm), but without conceding third-world literary archives entirely to modernism. Similarly, postmodernism in the contemporary novel was often described as a mode that superseded modernist tenets—ones which still avowed the possibility of objective understanding—by substituting more skeptical formulas in their place. This panel invites papers that explore the consequences of reframing the relationship between modern and contemporary in terms of “legacy,” “influence” and “connection,” rather than “opposition,” “refusal” or “upheaval.” What does the “continuity” model offer for the reading of contemporary literature or contemporary life? When “expanding” the meaning of modernism, do we implicitly seek to “arraogat[e] intellectual capital to those objects or conditions it (newly) designates” (David James, 2018)? If so, then what value system does our literary history encode? <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word paper proposal and a short biography to Jap-Nanak Makkar (japnanak.makkar@wilkes.edu) by March 5. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 05, 2019

For more information, contact: Jap-Nanak Makkar

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MSA 2019 - Modernism and the Sense of an Ending


Modernist Studies Association Conference <br />Toronto CA, October 17-20, 2019 <br /> <br />Modernism evokes not only renewal and novelty, but also collapse and exhaustion. This panel aims to explore various perspectives on ends and endings in modernist studies. Papers might explore conceptual problems like periodization, the avant-garde, or \"late style\"; and they might focus on more palpably material ends, like the final pages of a novel, the closing of a \"little magazine,\" or the loss of a friend or loved one. Particularly welcome are contributions that think about how to mediate these conceptual and material problems: how do modernist experiments with narrative form attempt to rethink the possible \"ends\" of modernity? how can scenes of revelation or judgment prompt readers into grappling with a shared crisis, whether ecological, political, or otherwise? <br /> <br />Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Ian Afflerbach at ian.afflerbach@ung.edu by March 5th 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 05, 2019

For more information, contact: Ian Afflerbach

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Indigenous/Modernist


Indigenous/Modernist <br /> <br />The recent “global” turn in modernist studies has helped us begin to rethink what it might mean to encounter multiple modernisms on their own terms. There is no question that it has been salutary for the field, even as it has generated a plethora of new challenges and difficult questions. Among those is how the drive for a global – even planetary – conceptions of modernism and modernity collide with the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples and their specific histories and cultural practices? How does global modernism link to petro-capitalist exploitations of Indigenous lands and peoples? How do modernist notions of cosmopolitanism map onto or contravene long-standing Indigenous patterns of trans-/international exchange? Is the expansion of modernism anything more than the offer of an exchange of prestige (the ‘modernist’ label) for postcolonial/settler colonial credibility and recognition? And at what potential expense (or benefit) for ongoing and often violent struggles over Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, and futurity? Is it possible to conceive of transnational, geo, global, or planetary modernisms that are not already compromised by imperialism or (settler) colonialism? And how might substantive engagements with Indigenous and Settler Colonial studies provide potential avenues to begin addressing such questions? <br /> <br />Send 250-word abstracts to Beth Piatote (piatote@berkeley.edu) by 4 March 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Beth Piatote

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Indigenous Modernities and Modernisms


Indigenous Modernities and Modernisms <br /> <br />Marshall Berman’s famous description of modernity in All That is Solid applies to no one so fully as to the Indigenous populations affected by 500 years of global imperialism. Indigenous peoples experienced sweeping change across all aspects of life on a scale and with an intensity unparalleled in Europe and England, or among settler populations around the world. Longstanding lifeways suddenly became “traditions” set against the juggernaut of the new, and a ruthless version of history that consigned Indigenous peoples to the past reframed diverse nation-peoples as “primitive,” “primordial,” “antiquated,” and in all cases “vanishing” … despite the ongoing presence and resistance of Native peoples. Looking east from Indian Country, all that is solid really did appear to be melting into air in what might be considered modernity on meth: a version of the alienation and disorientation so eloquently chronicled by Kafka, Stein, Céline, Eliot and others, but amplified exponentially in terms of intensity, consequences, and lasting impacts for Indigenous nations, peoples, and lands. <br /> <br />Given such hyper-intensive experiences of modernity, differently configured and experienced in diverse times and locales around the world, how did Indigenous writers, artists, intellectuals, and cultural producers respond? Facing the double-bind of racialized discourses of modernist “tradition” and “authenticity,” in what ways and across what venues, mediums, genres, and forms did Indigenous creatives place what Scott Lyons calls their own “x-marks” on modernity? If modernism is understood in one sense as aesthetic responses to the “anxieties” of modernity, what modernisms have emerged from this 500-year maelstrom of chaos, change, dislocation, resistance, resilience, and resurgence? What writers, artists, musicians, filmmakers, radio personalities, and intellectuals have even the expanded parameters of the New Modernist Studies still not taken into account? What ideas of modernism, modernity, and “the modern” have we missed so far, and how have they (and perhaps their erasure) provided the condition of possibility for ever-expanding field of modernist studies? If the history of modernity is also the history of Western imperialism and ongoing settler colonialism, how might an honest, sustained engagement with Indigenous modernisms and modernities—however defined—transform the field’s terms, scope, and objects of study? <br /> <br />Send 250-word abstracts to Kirby Brown (kbrown@uoregon.edu) by 4 March 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Kirby Brown

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Representing Indigeneity in Modernism


<br />Representing Indigeneity in Modernism <br /> <br />From Juan Rulfo to Joseph Conrad, from Solomon Plaatje to Albert Wendt, and from Tayeb Salih to Pramoedya Ananta Toer, modernist writers make widely varied uses of Indigenous characters in their novels. At the same time, Indigenous writers of the period—from Simon Pokagon, E. Pauline Johnson, Alexander Posey, and Zitkala-Sa to Charles Eastman, John Joseph Mathews, Mourning Dove, and D’Arcy McNickle—deliver powerful critiques of euroamerican “character” across a wide array of genres and forms. Read together, how are such figures variously represented, and what can we learn about modernist politics from those representations? If understood as figurative contact zones, how can we understand the nature of the encounters they record? Are there salient differences in how European, English, or American writers represent Indigenous populations, versus how Indigenous writers represent themselves or their euroamerican counterparts? Are most such representations tied inextricably to the imperialist ideologies still thriving in the early twentieth century,or are there avant-garde, experimental, and/or Indigenous-centered approaches that fundamentally disrupt the logics and politics of imperialist-colonialist expansion? What might such representations have to teach us about the apparently inextricable link between modernism and imperialism? <br /> <br />Send 250-word abstracts to Stephen Ross (saross@uvic.ca) by 4 March 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Stephen Ross

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Roundtable: the Modernisms of 1919


MSA 2019: Toronto <br /> <br />What are the modernisms of 1919? On this centenary of the 1919 Peace Conference, this roundtable seeks to ask our understanding of postwar modernism changes if we put the moment of 1919 at its center. Who are the men and women of 1919, at the center or in the peripheries of the liberal postwar settlement? What are the poetics and the politics particular to this reconstructive moment? How does our notion of the \"postwar\" change if we shift our focus to colonized and semicolonial modernities, to the creation of the vast Mandate territories, to the invasion and occupation of Haiti, to the revolutionary experiments in Münich and Fiume? How does the liberal settlement of 1919 shape modernist notions of human rights, refugee settlement, racial hierarchy, imperial control, sovereignty and debt? How might we integrate the May Fourth Movement in Chinese literary and political modernity into our historical accounts? What are the lasting effects of the upheavals and reconstructions of 1919 for literary modernities inside and outside the precincts of the Great War? <br /> <br />This roundtable seeks position papers, not full papers, that develop an argument about how to situate particular writers, texts, or literary traditions within the literary historiography of 1919, either in relation to particular local and national histories or within a broad world history. <br /> <br />Abstract of 250 words or less to ghankin@clemson.edu by March 4th 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Gabriel Hankins

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Indigenous Avant Gardes


Indigenous Avant-gardes <br /> <br />For many Indigenous peoples around the world, modernity begins in 1492, and remains inextricable from the predations of global imperialist expansion. Perhaps more than any other people anywhere on earth, Indigenous people have experienced the full force of modernity as a sweeping set of changes across their cultures and with unprecedented speed. At the same time, Indigenous peoples have been locked into tightly-constrained notions of tradition and custom that would seem to put their cultural productions at odds with concepts like the avant-garde. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to challenge such conceptions and to ask how have the particular modernities experienced by Indigenous people around the world have generated particular modernisms. How have they produced avant-garde practices? How might such works constitute a parallel or alternative to Anglo-European avant-gardes? How have they informed or been appropriated by them? How do they break with – or simply reject – canonical modernist aesthetics? What are the politics of such breaks, and how do they record the rapidly progressing modernities faced by Indigenous peoples around the world? <br /> <br />Send 250-word abstracts to Jonathan Radocay (jradocay@ucdavis.edu) by 4 March 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Jonathan Radocay

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Derivative Modernisms


Derivative Modernisms <br /> <br /> <br />Just how wide is modernism’s debt to Indigenous cultural practices? We all know that Picasso stole freely from African masks in developing his cubist aesthetic, but what other such thefts have remained hidden from view? What writers “borrowed” from Indigenous narrative contents and techniques without attribution? Which sculptors made Indigenous uses of volume and plane their own (lookin’ at you, Pompon!)? Which painters adapted Indigenous designs for apparently avant-garde results in the European setting? More broadly, how did settler government policies create the conditions of possibility for modernist experimentation and innovation? How is the politics of removal encoded in modernism’s aesthetic fireworks? Exactly how Indigenous is modernist aesthetics? <br /> <br />This panel proceeds from the deep suspicion that a great many more Indigenous influences shaped modernist aesthetics than have been acknowledged thus far. We seek papers that excavate such influences, with the aim of restoring credit to the borrowed-from. At the same time, we seek papers that expand the remit of modernism to include its elided Indigenous sources. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Send 250-word abstracts to Stephen Ross (saross@uvic.ca) by 4 March 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Stephen Ross

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Modernism, Disaster, and Nothingness


In his essay “The Literature of Nihilism” (1966), Paul de Man observes that “A literature of nihilism is not necessarily nihilistic.” While this idea may seem like a contradiction—indeed, what is nihilism if not nihilistic? —it raises an important issue. Even though a text calls to mind themes or images that are usually associated with nihilism—nothingness, despair, empty space—it does not mean that the text falls prey to an utterly empty conception of the idea. Furthermore, in The Writing of the Disaster (1980), Maurice Blanchot states that “the disaster ruins everything, all while leaving everything intact.” Drawing upon these concepts, this panel invokes the conference theme of “Upheaval and Reconstruction” by interrogating modernism’s interaction with the generative capacity of the ultimate “nihil.” How do we approach nothingness through disaster, and once we arrive at that point, what do we do? How do modernists use images of nothingness as spaces for creation? What clues are left not only in authors’ works but also in historical/biographical accounts that support modernity’s generative proclivity in the face of such turmoil? How do modernists talk about “nothing”? <br /> <br />This panel welcomes inter-disciplinary conversation, including papers that investigate modernist literature, art, history and/or philosophy, to further contextually examine the influences that might otherwise challenge contemporary notions of modernism’s complex struggle with conflict, anguish, and renewal. Some possible approaches include destruction as a mode for creation, modernism and nihilism, annihilation and sublime existence, and accidental versus deliberate destruction and creation. <br /> <br />Please send a brief paper proposal (250-300 words) and bio to Elysia Balavage (ecbalava@uncg.edu) by March 4, 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Elysia Balavage

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How Red Is Modernism?


Conference: MSA 2019, Toronto (October 17 – 20) <br />Panel Title: How Red Is Modernism? <br />Organizers: Matthew Gannon and Tavid Mulder <br /> <br />The perennial issue of the politics of modernism is in season once again. We might now finally be in a position to leave behind the intransigent Cold War opposition of political realism and apolitical modernism, opening the possibility of reevaluating modernist politics. Mark Steven's recent book Red Modernism, for instance, makes concrete historical connections between leftist social and political events and the practices and theories of literary modernism. Rather than avoid confronting modernism's right wing—and even fascist—commitments, Red Modernism actively engages and subverts modernism's reactionary tendencies with the aim, as Steven puts it, "to plant a gigantic red flag atop modernism’s literary monuments." <br /> <br />Contemporary interpretations of T. S. Eliot are emblematic of this emergent tendency to reframe the politics of modernism. Recent critics—including Robert S. Lehman and Jewel Spears Brooker—have convincingly argued that Eliot, despite his royalism and avowed conservatism, was a subtle dialectical thinker attuned to history, and C. D. Blanton has gone so far as to identify what he calls an "Eliotic Marxism." These critics, in effect, uncover an affinity between the formal commitments of modernism and critical theory's attention to the aesthetic as a privileged conceptual medium for disclosing the contradictions of capitalism. <br /> <br />We invite papers that take up anew the old debate of modernism's politics, or else respond to or intervene in the critical perspectives of today's theorists of modernism's politics. Papers might also ask how these politics assume different forms outside the metropolis. Panelists may also consider how modernist politics acquire different valences before or after the interwar moment. Modernism, politics, and aesthetics may be broadly conceived in this panel. <br /> <br />Topics considered might be: <br />- Autonomy <br />- Commodification and fetishization <br />- The politics of time and temporality <br />- The ideology of the aesthetic and the ideology of modernism <br />- Historical connections between modernists and their political movements <br />- The politics of peripheral modernism <br />- Realism vs. modernism <br />- Proletarian modernism <br /> <br />Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief bio to Matthew Gannon (matthew.gannon@bc.edu) and Tavid Mulder (tavid_mulder@brown.edu) by March 4, 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Matthew Gannon

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Modernism\'s \&quot;Little Wars\&quot;, 1919-1939


In October 1922, the British government was on the brink of entering the Graeco-Turkish War out of an emotional responsibility to safeguard British war graves in Gallipoli. E.M. Forster wrote three pieces criticizing the government in the newspaper press, including “Another Little War.” T.S. Eliot, too, wrote a letter to the Daily Mail, while Hemingway reported from Smyrna for the Toronto Star. References to the fighting would later find their way into both The Waste Land and In Our Time. After the centenary of the armistice, the aim of this panel is to bring authors’ responses to the “little wars” of the Interbellum into the limelight. By “little,” I mean not insignificant but underexplored, and not implicating the whole world (in the way the Great War had). Still, for modernists across the globe, these lesser-known conflicts provided opportunities for both action and reflection—on the legacies of the Great War after 1918, on authorship and civic engagement, on the forms and themes of their writing, on imperial politics. For, much of the upheaval of the 1920s and 30s took place in the collapsing colonial world, where the frontier had become the new front. <br /> <br />Contributions on modernism’s “little wars” may address (but are certainly not limited to) the following topics: modernism and the conflicts of the Interbellum (e.g. Döblin on the November Revolution, Anand on the Amritsar Massacre, Chang on the Sino-Japanese War); conflict in modernist writing (war, revolution, crisis, protest, riot, disagreement); modernism as violence; modernism and conflict resolution; modernism and decolonisation; modernism and Greater War (Gerwarth 2016) or Perpetual Interwar (Saint-Amour 2015); modernism and the memory of the Boer War; modernism and the news of war (radio, press, reporting); Spanish Civil War; Rif War; Irish Civil War; Abyssinian War; Egyptian Revolution; May Fourth Movement; the partition of the Ottoman Empire; the Arab Revolt in Palestine (etc.). <br /> <br />Abstracts (with short bio) are invited by March 4: cedric.vandijck@ugent.be <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2019

For more information, contact: Cedric Van Dijck

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Observing Upheaval: Modernism and Surveillance


Observing Upheaval: Modernism and Surveillance <br />Organisers: Stephanie J Brown and Emily Hainze <br /> <br />Panel description: <br />This panel explores the relationship between modernism and forms of surveillance the emerged during the modernist period. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw the rehearsal of bureaucratic state power throughout empire and its consolidation in Western states. Our panel queries how different media forms, working at scales that vary from the compactness of the lyric, the photograph, and the case file to the expansiveness of the census, the sociological study, and the ordinance survey, registered emerging surveillance culture. How did they experiment with, produce, and undermine the boundaries of knowledge practices that aimed to manage populations and lives, and to reinforce intersecting hierarchies of class, race, gender, and sexuality? <br /> <br />The panel organizers are particularly interested in papers that engage with: <br /> <br />-The circulation of surveillance practices across sites/borders/boundaries <br />-Sousveillance as an individual or communal practice within modernity <br />-Andrea Mubi Brighenti’s notion of “artveillance” <br />-Institutional surveillance practices and/in public discourse <br />-Surveillance as productive of embodied and/or affective experiences <br />-The archives of modernism via recent work on surveillance, policing and race such as Simone Browne’s Dark Matters (2015), Jackie Wang’s Carceral Capitalism (2018) and Saidiya Hartman’s Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (2019) <br />-Emergent surveillance forms in the modernist period <br />-Surveillance aesthetics <br />-Wartime surveillance at home and abroad <br />-Sites of surveillance as culturally productive <br />-Work on sites or practices of surveillance not commonly recognized as such <br />-Surveillance and modernist biopolitics <br />-Surveillance and culture(s) of policing, covert versus overt surveillance practices <br />-Intersections between surveillance practices and anti-colonial art/activism or resistance to the state <br />-Self-surveillance as cultural production <br />-Opting in: mass obs and similar projects <br />-Surveillance and modernist discourses of privacy <br />-Modernist self-censorship as internalized surveillance <br />-New methods for reading surveillance archives <br />-Pre-histories of contemporary surveillance practice, technology, or concerns <br /> <br />To those interested, please send a brief abstract (250-300 words) and bio to both Steph Brown (stephbrown@email.arizona.edu) and Emily Hainze (ehainze@bu.edu ) by March 2.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 02, 2019

For more information, contact: Steph Brown

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Echoes of Earlier Avant-garde Anti-normative Discourses in Contemporary Drama


In the last decades, increasing numbers of scholarly works have recognized the discursive violence of Dadaist, Surrealist, and Expressionist theatre as an ethically motivated attack meant to question the function, purpose, and cultural value of representational (“traditional”) art in light of what Avant-garde artists saw as its participation in a regime of signs that offered tacit, implicit support to controlling or repressive state structures, culminating in the horror of the first, and then the second World Wars. The same argument has been made concerning a number of experimental dramas produced in the aftermath of the second World War, with many commentators beginning to emphasize substantial similarities between these dramas and earlier Avant-garde works in terms of their use of destabilizing language operations, construction of a subject lacking organicity, and denunciation of the mechanisms of containment and repression that can transform reason into its exploitative-genocidal opposite (nationalism, racism, violent heteronormativity, colonialism, militarism, religious extremism, etc.). <br />This panel seeks papers that explore connections between earlier Avant-garde anti-normative discourses and late twentieth-century/ contemporary drama, with the purpose of emphasizing the emergence of increasingly intense imaginary investments in equality and the elimination of systemic exploitation and repression over the last 100 years of theatrical production. <br />Please send 300-500-word proposals to Cristina Ionica (Fanshawe College), cristina_ionica@yahoo.com

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Cristina Ionica

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Logics of Conflict in 20th Century Women’s Drama


In Excitable Speech, Judith Butler proposes a chiasmatic model for the understanding of conflict, as she analyzes the role of injurious speech in relating injury (socially contingent and avoidable) and subordination or subjection (the constitutive condition of the subject). Using a theoretical framework that combines elements of Lacanian, Althusserian, and Foucauldian critical discourse, Butler explores the possibilities of resistance available to the actors involved in a situation of conflict and concludes that none of the various regimes of normalization, subordination and subjection surrounding the individual at any given moment can ensure the individual’s complete, infallible subjection insofar as both the individual and these regimes of signs are, in some ways, “excitable,” unstable entities. <br />Considering the centrality of the notions of performativity and performance to Butler’s theorization of subjection, as well as Lacan’s definition of the “woman” position as a “not wholly there” in the domain of phallic control, this panel seeks critical and theoretical explorations of the ways in which various logics of conflict (family/ intergenerational, war-related, environmental, class/ gender/ race-based, etc.) are represented in twentieth-century/ contemporary women’s drama. An extended discussion of the themes, linguistic conventions, affective states, and body language that emerge consistently from these representations of conflict should allow for interesting conclusions concerning the ways in which various logics of conflict intersect in contemporary women’s drama and reflect on changing social realities. Many such works re-imagine, redefine, and confront conflict in ways that accentuate its chiasmatic composition to further destabilize its destructive potential. In a world of ever-morphing and often volatile socio-political realities, the import of approaches to conflict that can sidestep the constraints of more traditional models of conflict resolution extends beyond the physical limits of the stage, reaffirming the value of theatre as a transformative social experience. <br />Please send your proposals (300-500 words) to Cristina Ionica (Fanshawe College), cristina_ionica@yahoo.com.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Cristina Ionica

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&quot;Tradition and the Individual Talent&quot; at 100


This panel invites scholars to reflect on the meaning and significance of T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent" (1919) to mark the centenary of its first publication. In keeping with the conference theme, it welcomes papers that address Eliot's writerly attempt to uphold tradition as a natural response to the historical upheavals of this tumultuous time. Beyond that, however, it asks scholars to grapple with the critical legacy of Eliot's landmark essay, which promoted the widespread tendency to read modernism as a narrative about the depersonalization of literature. It further encourages them to consider how this seminal text laid the groundwork for many subsequent critical approaches (from New Criticism to post-structuralism to more recent engagements with form) and artistic movements (from Imagism to concrete poetry to autofiction). Please send a 300-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Alexander McKee at abmckee@udel.edu by March 1, 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Alexander McKee

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Modernist Afterlives and the Politics of Literary Inheritance


This panel investigates how the decisions of literary heirs and estates, the management of archives, the dissemination of permissions, and/or the movement of surviving manuscripts influenced the literary afterlives of those modernist authors who, before their “reclamation” and “rediscovery” in the 1970s, had all but slipped out of public and scholarly consciousness. What happens to the work of the woman writer who has been writing “ahead of her time” in a world where the inheritor of her papers and the disseminator of her legacy is, say, a disapproving husband, son, or nephew? Or to the work of the woman writer who lacks the financial means or legal status to formalize a literary estate, whose works are “orphaned” after her death and locked in copyright limbo for decades to come? This panel will pay special attention to the racial and gender underpinnings of intergenerational inheritance, copyright management, and publishing and to how these factors have influenced our understanding of the landscape of literary modernism today. <br /> <br />We welcome proposals that draw on interdisciplinary methods including, but not limited to, feminist, gender, and sexuality studies; critical race/ethnic studies; disability studies; law and literature; material/cultural history; and book history. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to engage with the following areas, as they pertain to a specific author or set of authors: the growth and management of archives; archival discoveries and access; literary estates and executors; copyright management and publishing permissions; legalities of inheritance; and print and publication history. Submissions might also consider how these factors and questions bear upon the evolution of literary studies, revisions of “canon,” and disciplinary, institutional, or departmental priorities, and reflect upon the methodological implications for literary studies that follow from these questions. Papers focusing on authors who lived and wrote outside the interwar period, and for whom these questions are relevant, are welcome as well. <br /> <br />Please submit a 300-word paper proposal and brief bio to abp77@cornell.edu by March 1, 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Alec Pollak

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Upheavals and Affect: Politics and Methods


“But modernism’s longevity,” David James reminds us in his recent article, “may also disclose certain critical impulses that arguably say just as much about the affective energies of championing modernism’s terminological adaptability as about the precise aesthetic, historical, or ideological anatomy of modernism’s myriad practices and remediations” (“Modernism’s Contemporary Affects”). As the new modernist studies garners increasingly concentrated attention to affect—from Charles Altieri’s The Particulars of Rapture (2003) and Sianne Ngai’s Ugly Feelings (2005) to Julia Taylor’s edited volume Modernism and Affect (2015), Modernism/modernity’s special issue on weak theory and weak modernism (2018), and the Modernism/modernity Print Plus cluster “Modernism’s Contemporary Affects” (2018)—this panel invokes the conference theme by calling for rigorous investigations into the disruption affect brings to both literary representation and our interpretive practice. What do we talk about when we talk about modernism’s “affect”? In a field often defined by its troublingly obstinate resistance to exposition and the multifarious demands, shocks, and obfuscation faced by its readership, can affect provide us with more dynamic modes of critical inquiry into the hermeneutical slipperiness of modernism? How do we reconcile the tension between the epistemological uncontainablity of affect and the methodological demands of modernist studies? What theoretical reformulations of affect and interpretation do we need if we want to take into account our affective entanglement and ideological alignment with modernism\'s affect? What are the revolutionary and reactionary politics of modernism’s affect and our reading methods? How do we understand modernism’s affect in relation to the historical and social production of affect as partaking in commodity fetishism and ideological apparatuses? <br /> <br />To those interested, please send a brief abstract (250-300 words) and bio to both Kevin Tunnicliffe (ktunni@uvic.ca) and Amy Tang (yantang@uvic.ca).

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Kevin Tunnicliffe and Amy Tang

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Making the Stones Speak: First World War Memorials


War memorials, whether elegiac or heroic, attempt to give physical form to aspects of national character and memory forged by war. However, they also embody tensions between private grief and public commemoration, the silence of loss and the necessity of public speech and symbolism that can assign meaning to that loss. Moreover, because war memorials must answer to varied demands—those of a nation or city, veterans, mourners, artists, planning commissions, and communities—they are very often sites of social and aesthetic contestation. <br /> <br />This panel aims to explore WWI memorialization in the form of statues, monuments, buildings, cemeteries and installations, both in the immediate aftermath of the war and more recently. Papers might consider the tensions within war memorials between permanence and impermanence, stone and flesh, presence and absence, abstraction and figuration, or the interplay of silent stone with the “speaking” of inscriptions, dedicatory speeches or poems, or literary or cinematic representations of memorials. Papers that consider the exclusion of certain groups from commemoration, memorial structures as sites of protest or mourning, or centenary installations or structures are also welcome. Papers may take any of various disciplinary perspectives—art historical, architectural, historical, literary, cinematic--and focus on any national or transnational context. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and brief bio to Stacy Hubbard at sch1@buffalo.edu by March 1st. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, CA
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Stacy Hubbard

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Modernism in Translation


Modernism in Translation. <br /> <br />In the wake of this year’s conference theme, the panel seeks to investigate the ways in which modernist writers employed translation in their responses to trauma, war, displacement, totalitarianism and other crises of identity, language, culture and consciousness. Panelists are invited to explore the range of functions that translations have performed – e.g. as modes of reconstruction, as sites of crosslingual and crosscultural negotiation, as acts of protest or testimony, of resistance or subservience to censorship – from both literary and sociopolitical perspectives. <br /> <br />Please submit a 250-300 word abstract to Silvia Guslandi sguslandi@uchicago.edu by March 1 2019 <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2019

For more information, contact: Silvia Guslandi

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CFP Modernist Legacies and Futures: Modernist Studies Ireland inaugural conference


Modernist Legacies and Futures: Modernist Studies Ireland inaugural conference <br /> <br />Friday 17th May 2019 <br /> <br />National University of Ireland Galway <br /> <br />Plenary Speaker: Dr Ben Levitas, Goldsmiths University of London <br /> <br />In many ways, Modernism’s future is now. We are still grappling with modernism’s aftermath, afterlives, and its perpetual relevance. The new textualities and ephemera available to scholars today make it increasingly important to reconsider how creative figures conceived and constructed their future both within their work and in the material cultures they occupied. <br /> <br />The increasing digitisation of cultural materials is reshaping how we interact and understand modernist practice. Archives, newspapers, periodicals, and digital critical editions are allowing scholars to read, see, or listen to the cultural atmospheres of modernity, whilst reading texts anew with digital analysis technologies. Modernism was a movement marked by a dynamic play with concepts of time and temporality. This forged both a sense of periodicity and a moment of crisis in expressing the present and perceiving the future. The study of plural, reterritorialised modernisms and the growing body of available materials opens up new avenues for understanding how and why modernism came into being through artists, publishers, academics, and institutions. The corpus of modernist studies is expanding rapidly and this expansion includes materials that we also create. The aesthetic politics of neomodernism and protomodernism continues to pose questions regarding the remaking and influence modernist practice has today. <br /> <br />The inaugural conference of Modernist Studies Ireland, ‘Modernist Legacies and Futures’ seeks to bring together Irish and international scholars to initiate an exchange and review of current research, trends, and findings in modernist studies. We ask scholars to consider how modernists created or negated the future in their work? Did modernist artists conceive of the future as a prerequisite of the work itself and, if so, how did they attempt to secure their legacy? What does the digital landscape achieve for modernism studies? What future does modernist studies have? If modernism was a radical attempt to reshape culture and art did it succeed and how can we as scholars perpetuate this radicalism? Do current attempts to democratise the study of literature and unsettle canonicity impact future research? What modernisms are missing from the field of modernist study? What does modernism mean to minority languages, cultures, and to a non-western canon? <br /> <br />We invite contributions for 20-minute papers on themes such as, but not limited to: <br /> <br />- Modernist aesthetics and futurity <br />- Time and temporality <br />- Age, ageing, and youth <br />- Vision and revision <br />- Collaborative acts and interdisciplinary practice <br />- Modernist editing and the legacy of ‘the work’ <br />- Periodical and print networks <br />- Minor’ literatures or non-Anglophone modernisms Modernism in the digital humanities <br />- Gendered and queer modernisms <br />- Metamodernism and neomodernism <br />- Historicising or geo-politicising modernisms and modernities <br />- Space and representation <br />- Modernism in and of media <br />- Transnational and global modernisms <br />- Modernist afterlives and futures <br />- Modernist (im-)possibilities, utopias, dystopias <br />- Pedagogy and modernist studies <br />- Archives, databases, and digital collections <br />- Editing and publishing histories <br />- Canon formation and redefinition <br /> <br /> <br />Please submit an abstract and brief biography by 5pm, Feb 28th 2019 <br /> <br />For further information please contact: modstudiesireland@gmail.com <br /> <br />Modernist Studies Ireland (MSI) is a new organisation that aims to facilitate the sharing of interests, research, and pedagogical approaches to modernism and modernity in the Republic and Northern Ireland. Modernist Studies Ireland provides a network to communicate our new research, publications, and archival holdings to a local and global audience. <br /> <br />Further information on the initiative can be found here: https://worksinprogressnuig.wordpress.com/ <br /> <br />Twitter: @Mod_Ireland <br /> <br />Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/modernistireland/ <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Galway, Ireland
Conference Starts: May 17, 2019
Conference Ends: May 17, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019

For more information, contact: Gaby Fletcher

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CFP MSA 2019, Toronto: Popular Modernisms: Forms, Genres, Sub-Genres


Over the past twenty years, modernist scholars have productively interrogated, probed, and disassembled the “great divide” between modernism and popular culture. This panel seeks to continue that work by examining intersections, exchanges, disjunctions, and conflicts between modernism and popular forms of cultural production. Panelists might examine major popular cultural forms such as adventure tales, crime fiction, comic strips, science fiction, Hollywood films, radio plays, Jazz music, etc., or any popular cultural sub-genres such as fairy tale fantasy, how to books, romance pulps, esoteric magazines, animal comics, picture books, time-travel romances, Romans à clef, ghost stories, proletarian fiction, etc. etc. <br /> <br />Please send paper abstracts of 350-500 words and brief bio-bibliographical statements by February 28 to Paul Peppis: ppeppis@uoregon.edu.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019

For more information, contact: Paul Peppis

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Mediation, the Urban, and Cultural Memory


Title: “Mediation, the Urban, and Cultural Memory” <br /> <br />Friedrich Kittler famously claimed that the city was the quintessential space of modernity in its spatial capacity as a “medium” for data storage, exchange, and processing. Kittler argued that to explore how various “mediums” store, exchange, and process cultural memory can help us understand how those in the early twentieth-century responded to the anxiety surrounding what Walter Benjamin described as the increasing loss of shared memory. This panel proposes to explore representations of media (broadly conceived) and mediation in an urban setting as part of a response to modernity’s threat to established tradition. This media can range from the “old” new media such as telegraphy, photography, and cinema to urban infrastructure such as “water supply, electricity, highways” (Kittler) that supply the energy needed in order for information to circulate. Paper topics could include, but need not be limited to, studies of works, genres, or forms that facilitate memorialization, or analysis on modernist representations or discourses on media’s role in enhancing or destabilizing memory. Please send a 300-word abstract of your proposed paper and a short bio to JiHae Koo (kooji@iu.edu) by February 24, 2019. <br />

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 24, 2019

For more information, contact: JiHae Koo

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The Ambivalent Goods of Decadent Modernism


In recent years, modernist studies has become increasingly attuned to the uses of decadence as a critical framework for interrogating the ethical, aesthetic, and political tensions of modernity, thanks in part to the work of scholars like David Weir (2018), Vincent Sherry (2015), and Kristin Mahoney (2015). One of the prevailing trends in recent criticism has been a tendency to see modernist decadence as a sensibility of deep ambivalence, skepticism toward the claims of progress, and acute sensitivity to the threatening, nullifying, or affectively “negative” elements of modernity—a sensibility that Weir has recently characterized as “dark humanism.” <br /> <br />This proposed panel hopes to expand on recent reassessments of decadence by focusing less on what is explicitly “dark” about decadence than on what remains ambivalent. To that end, this panel solicits papers exploring how modernists of the post-fin de siècle period drew on logics and rhetorics of decadence to navigate conflicting feelings and commitments toward various forms of “the good”—to objects of joy, happiness, liveliness, affirmation, and desire. <br /> <br />Possible points of departure include, but are not limited to, the following topics: <br />- Affect-oriented readings of joy or happiness in works of decadent modernism <br />- Decadence as a modernist counter-culture <br />- Commodity fetishism and Marxist readings of decadence <br />- The politics of modernist decadence <br />- Decadence as a version—or perversion—of “the good life” <br />- Decadence as transgression of normative conceptions of gender, sexuality, or ethics <br />- Philosophical or scientific readings of modernist decadence (e.g., in the context of relativity, evolutionary theory, psychoanalysis, or vitalism) <br />- Decadence, race, and the Harlem Renaissance <br />- Comparative approaches to modernist decadence (e.g., before and after the World Wars) <br />- Versions of decadence in modernist popular culture <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a brief biographical note, to Tim Clarke (tclar089@uottawa.ca) by February 20th, 2019.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 20, 2019

For more information, contact: Tim Clarke

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Roundtable: Periodization, Modernism(s), and Caribbean Literature


Call for Proposals <br />Roundtable: Periodization, Modernism(s), and Caribbean Literature <br /> <br />MSA 2019, Toronto <br />October 17-20, 2019 <br /> <br />An expanding modernist studies has traced intersections between modernism/modernity and Caribbean literatures, as in Simon Gikandi’s Writing in Limbo (1992) and Mary Lou Emery’s Modernism, the Visual, and Caribbean Literature (2007), among others. At the same time, scholarship in Caribbean studies has also rethought periodization and canonization, as in Alison Donnell’s Twentieth-Century Caribbean Literature (2006) and Leah Rosenberg and J. Dillon Brown\'s Beyond Windrush collection (2015). As modernist studies continues to grapple with histories of modernity/coloniality, and as Caribbean studies increasingly turns to literature produced in the first half of the twentieth century, this roundtable seeks to debate where, how, and why the intersection of these two fields becomes most fraught or productive, generating upheavals and reconstructions in either one. <br /> <br />The roundtable format calls for position statements (rather than full papers) followed by discussion. The goal of this session is to generate a conversation about disciplinary categories, periodization, and methodology that also remains grounded in textual examples. Contributions that look beyond Caribbean writers that appear most often in modernist studies (such as Jean Rhys and Claude McKay) or that approach such writers’ work in new ways are of particular interest. <br /> <br />Contributions might address, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />-Given modernist studies’ frequent emphasis on British, European, and US-American metropoles, how might Caribbean-centered texts across a variety of forms and genres offer a different portrait of literary experimentation in the early twentieth century? <br /> <br />-How might understudied Caribbean literature of this period add to or complicate modernist studies approaches to modernity/coloniality, race, and/or diasporic internationalisms? Add to or complicate either field’s shifting, at-times competing notions of “modernism” as a period or aesthetic? <br /> <br />-Institutional and disciplinary histories in both fields, aesthetic hierarchies in both fields, or political/ethical questions about how foundational concepts or practices in one field can or cannot apply to the other. <br /> <br />Please email a 200-word description of your proposed contribution to the roundtable, as well as a short bio, to kperillo@umass.edu by February 15.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2019

For more information, contact: Kate Perillo

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Modernism\'s everyday intimacies


Seeking co-panellists for a prospective MSA 2020 panel on \"Modernism\'s everyday intimacies.\" <br /> <br />In an age of social and political upheaval, during which a range of social configurations were deliberately refashioned by a variety of thinkers, writers and organisations, intimate relationships stand to be an illuminating subject of focus. As Lauren Berlant has observed, intimacy signals both to the public and the private, with its “inwardness” being matched by a “corresponding publicness.” As such, relationships which on the surface may seem common and routine—marriages, families and friendships—might equally serve to dramatise wider debates about society and the self. <br /> <br />This panel will propose to explore how portrayals of intimacy play a role in modernist cultural responses to the changing conditions of modernity, examining how this aspect of the modernist social imagination was produced and developed in fiction, drama, poetry or other, non-literary arts. <br /> <br />Paper topics could include, but need not be limited to, studies of domestic space and the home, families, sexuality, conflict, gender and social structures as they come to bear on individual lives. <br /> <br />Please send a short (<300 words) description of your proposed paper to Stephanie Boland at the address below before February 14th, 2019. <br /> <br />Thanks!

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 17, 2019
Conference Ends: October 20, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: February 14, 2019

For more information, contact: Stephanie Boland

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ASA 2019: Resisting Anti-Black Racism: An American Anti-Fascist Tradition


Famously, in his Discourse on Colonialism, Aimé Césaire declares the great crime of Hitler to be the unsanctioned substitution of the object of anti-black violence: “the fact that he applied to Europe colonialist procedures which until then had been reserved exclusively for the Arabs of Algeria, the ‘coolies’ of India, and the ‘niggers’ of Africa.” While his insight has marked black studies, it has gone rather unacknowledged within the subfield of fascist studies, most often the province of history and comparative literature departments and prosecuted rather eurocentrically. This panel, building on Christopher Vials\'s Haunted by Hitler (2014), attempts to strengthen the connection between American Studies and Fascist Studies by drawing on American Studies’ tradition of analysis and theorization of resistance to anti-black racism. <br /> <br />The links between fascism and anti-black racism have already been underscored, by the work of Achilles Mbembe (2003) and Alexander Weheliye (2014)—often employed within American Studies—which envision the fascist conception of the state (and concentration camp within it) as a framework first fleshed out with black bodies. Most recently, Vaughn Rasberry’s Race and the Totalitarian Century (2016) highlights how “African American and Third World writers, drawing on an imaginative and rhetorical repertoire of desegregation and decolonization, activated an alternative global dialogue on totalitarian governance.” This panel seeks to build on black studies’ tradition of acknowledging the interrelation of fascism and anti-black racism to consider how responses to anti-black racism and violence might offer insight into how to conceive anti-fascist resistance. It asks us to think through this “alternative global dialogue on totalitarian governance” to reconceive both what fascism might look like—and how we can respond to it. <br /> <br />So, this panel asks two primary questions: How do we describe fascism? And how do we respond to it? These questions are invariably linked, and the panel looks to illuminate them through engagement with historical and cultural situations from across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Where are the places of overlap and difference in anti-fascist and anti-racist resistance? What tropes and aesthetics are motivated—by fascists and anti-fascists? by racists and anti-racists? Are there specific media and media epistemologies in play? In looking at how these responses to anti-black racism illuminate fascism, this panel also asks us to consider how fascism might illuminate troubling aspects of non-fascist regimes and orders too. How do so-called liberal regimes appear when we bring together anti-black racism and fascism? <br /> <br />Committed to interdisciplinary and intermedial approaches, this panel welcomes historical, sociological, and cultural studies. It is neither temporally nor geographically limited (transnational projects encouraged!), though it does encourage historically specific work. It is also very interested in work that utilizes feminist and queer approaches. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words and a short bio to sibernst@usc.edu by January 28. <br /> <br />***This CFP is for the American Studies Association Annual Meeting 2019, November 7-10 in Honolulu***

Conference Location: Honolulu, USA
Conference Starts: November 07, 2019
Conference Ends: November 10, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: January 28, 2019

For more information, contact: Sanders I. Bernstein

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