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Representing Empire in British Modernism—A Crisis of Environmental Aesthetic


Representing Empire in British Modernism—A Crisis of Environmental Aesthetics <br /> <br />Social histories of our contemporary climate crisis increasingly emerge alongside the geologic. Though a global phenomenon, recent conversations among historians of Britain have suggested that English culture and history may play a special role in the emergence of the Anthropocene era which we currently inhabit - both as the birth place of the industrial revolution, and because of the British empire’s global natural resource extraction networks and the culture and policies which maintained them at home in England. <br /> <br />This panel asks how the dominant literary trend of Modernism, which emerges in the decades leading up to the great acceleration of environmental change in the mid-twentieth century, engages with, responds to, perpetuates, resists, constitutes, or otherwise represents community(ies) in response to environmental disaster or devastation in the British empire. <br /> <br />The panel hopes to pay particular attention to works by authors from territories other than England proper – those authored by colonial British subjects during the early twentieth century. Four presentations will explore questions related but not limited to: the environmental devastation of the period’s colonial and world wars; representations of the changing landscapes and natural spaces of the British empire; the use of environmental aesthetics to mediate and respond to the myriad social, political, and economic upheaval; direct representations of environmental crisis. <br /> <br />The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2018. You will be notified whether or not your submission has been accepted to the panel no later than January 10, 2019. The panel is an already approved session in the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, to be held June 26-30, 2019, at the University of California, Davis. Submit here: https://asle.submittable.com/submit/126701/representing-empire-in-british-modernisma-crisis-of-environmental-aesthetics. Please send any inquiries to Molly Volanth Hall atmolly_hall@uri.edu. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Davis, CA, USA
Conference Starts: June 26, 2019
Conference Ends: June 30, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018

For more information, contact: Molly Volanth Hall

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Call For Papers: ‘Literature, Law and Psychoanalysis, 1890-1950’


<br />Keynote Speakers: <br /> <br />Dr Ravit Reichman <br />Dr Lizzie Seal <br />Dr Victoria Stewart <br /> <br />Call For Papers: <br /> <br />The twentieth-century was a period of worldwide literary experiment, of scientific developments and of worldwide conflict. These changes demanded a rethinking not merely of psychological subjectivity, but also of what it meant to be subject to the law and to punishment. This two-day conference aims to explore relationships between literature, law and psychoanalysis during the period 1890-1950, allowing productive mixing of canonical and popular literature and also encouraging interdisciplinary conversations between different fields of study. <br /> <br />The period examined by the conference included: developments in Freudian psychoanalysis and its branching in other directions; the founding of criminology; continuing campaigns and reforms around the death penalty; landmark modernist publications; the ‘Golden Age’ of detective fiction; and multiple sensational trials (Wilde, Crippen, Casement, Leopold and Loeb, to name but a few). Freud’s followers, like Theodor Reik and Hans Sachs, would publish work on criminal law and the death penalty; psychoanalysts were sought after as expert witnesses; novelists like Elizabeth Bowen would serve on a Royal Commission investigating capital punishment; while Gladys Mitchell invented the character of Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley as a literary detective-psychoanalyst. <br /> <br />We therefore hope to consider areas including literature’s connection with historical debates around crime and punishment; literature and authors on trial and/or on the ‘psychiatrist\'s couch’; and literature’s effect on debates about human rights. The event is linked to and partly supported by an AHRC project on literature, psychoanalysis and the death penalty, but the aim of this conference is much wider. Interdisciplinary approaches, especially from fields such as psychoanalysis, philosophy, law or the visual arts, are particularly encouraged. We also welcome papers on international legal systems and texts. All responses are welcome and the scope of our interdisciplinary interests is flexible, with room in the planned programme for strands of work that might be more or less literary. <br /> <br />Possible topics might include: <br /> <br />psychoanalysis in the real or literary courtroom; <br /> <br />literary form and the insanity defence; <br /> <br />canonical authors as readers of crime fiction and vice versa; <br /> <br />censorship cases; <br /> <br />the influence of famous legal cases on literary productions or on psychoanalytic theory; <br /> <br />influences of criminology and criminal psychology on literature; <br /> <br />representations of new execution methods (for example, the gas chamber and the electric chair); <br /> <br />portrayals of restorative versus retributive justice; <br /> <br />literary responses to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; <br /> <br />relationships between modernism and Critical Legal Studies (CLS). <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Please send 250 word paper proposals or 300 word proposals for fully formed panels to Dr Katherine Ebury at litlawpsy2019@gmail.com by 28th November 2018. <br />

Conference Location: University of Sheffield, UK
Conference Starts: April 11, 2019
Conference Ends: April 13, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: November 28, 2018

For more information, contact: Dr Katherine Ebury

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ACLA 2019: Revisions of Fascism: History, Aesthetics, and Affect


“The logical outcome of fascism is an aestheticizing of political life,” writes Walter Benjamin in \"The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility,\" thus placing aesthetics at the center of the critical discourse on fascism. Employed in work as disparate as Klaus Theweleit’s Male Fantasies (1977/1987) and Erin Carlston’s Thinking Fascism (1995), Alice Kaplan’s Reproductions of Banality (1986) and Mark Christian Thompson’s Black Fascisms (2007), Benjamin’s concept has situated fascism as a historical and phenomenological phenomenon. Reproduced incessantly, this line of Benjamin’s refuses to resolve into a single tradition of thought, a crystallized image. What—as we still feel we must ask in our current moment of danger—does it mean for fascism to be the “aestheticizing of political life”? <br /> <br /> <br />This seminar explores this question of aesthetics through the interrelations of fascism, visual culture, historiography, and the body, considering how Benjamin’s “aestheticizing of political life” might be understood as a name for a particular aesthetics of history. In other words, how does the aestheticization and mediation of history—a mediation that often relies on new media technologies—become a key site for the consolidation or contestation of fascist power? Can one say that fascism takes form through history? (I.e., is there a way of telling history in which fascism inheres?) And what is the status of different media, or genres, in the production of these histories? <br /> <br /> <br />While this seminar seizes upon history—as expressed within literary, filmic, or photographic texts—as a potentially central location for the dissemination of fascism, Benjamin’s emphasis on aesthetics remains at its heart, as it is the aesthetics of these histories which work upon and engage their audiences. Thus, it is also very interested in the analyses about effects and affects of histories imbricated with fascism. How does fascist history feel? How does it affect its audience? To what extent does historiography regulate and discipline the body (anatamo- or bio-politically)? Might the body be the form of fascist history? <br /> <br /> <br />Committed to interdisciplinary and intermedial approaches, this seminar welcomes work on popular as well as canonical literature, film, and photography. It is neither temporally nor geographically limited (transnational projects encouraged!), though it does encourage historically specific work. We are likewise interested in work that utilizes feminist and queer approaches as well as critical race theory. <br /> <br />This CFP is for a seminar for the ACLA Annual Meeting 2019, March 7-10 in Washington, D.C.. Please submit a proposal of 250 words through the ACLA website by 9 AM EST on September 20. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact sanders.bernstein at gmail.com or kristin.canfield at utexas.com.

Conference Location: Washington, D.C., United States
Conference Starts: March 07, 2019
Conference Ends: March 10, 2019

CFP Submission Deadline: September 20, 2018

For more information, contact: Sanders Bernstein

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Fashion in the Magazines


CFP: "FASHION IN THE MAGAZINES," JOURNAL OF MODERN PERIODICAL STUDIES (6/30/2018) <br /> <br />Co-editors: Ilya Parkins (University of British Columbia) and Lise Shapiro Sanders (Hampshire College) <br /> <br />We seek essays for a special issue of the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies on "Fashion in the Magazines."€ Exploring fashion's complex relationship to the present, the new and the now, this special issue will focus on the significance of fashion to histories of modernity, and to modernism's engagement with history. Questions to be addressed include: How did modernist texts, in concert with periodicals as the primary venue in which fashion writing appeared, address fashion, fashionability, and historical style? In what ways do fashion, clothing, and costume illuminate or complicate notions of literary and historical periodization? What insights can be gained into the presence of the past by exploring the role of fashion in modernism's emphasis on "making it new"? A major goal is to engage the multiple contexts in which fashion circulated from the 1880s through the 1950s -- not only in modernist magazines, but also in popular periodicals, and in advertising, design, and illustration as these intersected with the periodical press. <br /> <br />This special issue is designed to redress the relative critical silence about fashion in feminist periodical studies, which persists even as fashion studies has burgeoned. Recent scholarship in the new modernist studies and the history of popular culture has begun to address this occlusion, and in this special issue we extend this discussion by focusing on fashion in the modern periodical, broadly conceived. Comparative and intersectional scholarship, and studies that engage locations in the Global South, are particularly welcome. <br /> <br />Prospective contributors are invited to submit a 500-word abstract and a brief bio to Ilya Parkins (ilya.parkins@ubc.ca) and Lise Shapiro Sanders (lsanders@hampshire.edu) by 30 June 2018. <br /> <br />Editor biographies: <br /> <br />Ilya Parkins is Associate Professor of Gender and Women'€™s Studies at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus. She is the author of Poiret, Schiaparelli, Dior: Fashion, Femininity and Modernity (Berg, 2012) and the co-editor of Cultures of Femininity in Modern Fashion (UPNE, 2011). Her research on fashion, feminist theory, and mediations of femininities in modernist and contemporary contexts has drawn extensively on fashion magazines and periodical studies, and has appeared in periodicals including Time & Society, Feminist Review, Australian Feminist Studies, and the collection Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-39. <br /> <br />Lise Shapiro Sanders is Associate Professor of English Literature and Cultural Studies at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. Her research and teaching interests include nineteenth- and twentieth-century British literature, print media and popular culture, film studies, and women's and gender studies. She is the author of Consuming Fantasies: Labor, Leisure, and the London Shopgirl, 1880-1920 (Ohio State UP, 2006) and, with Amy Bingaman and Rebecca Zorach, co-editor of Embodied Utopias: Gender, Social Change, and the Modern Metropolis (Routledge, 2002). Her articles have appeared in Modern Fiction Studies, Women's History Review, and several edited collections. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: April 16, 2018
Conference Ends: June 30, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 30, 2018

For more information, contact: Lise Shapiro Sanders

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James Joyce Quarterly Special Issue: Joyce and the Non-Human


The idea for this issue began with a panel for the Toronto Joyce Symposium on Our Funnaminal World, which later turned into the theme for the 2018 Zurich James Joyce Workshop (Joycean Animals). The topic came about as a result of our growing interest in animal studies and the nonhuman, specifically with reference to an increasingly technologically driven society. This theoretical context is one that intersects nicely with other theories ” (ecocriticism, Marxism, queer studies, gender studies, technology studies, postcolonialism, posthumanism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction) but it also transcends these frameworks, in that it is specifically relevant to 21st-century issues. The lens of the nonhuman provides new insights into well-trodden pastures such as Bloom’s cat, Garryowen, and cattle, in addition to bestiality, animality, and the beastly. We anticipate the special issue consolidating and building on recent work in Joyce Studies, including Eco-Joyce: The Environmental Imagination of James Joyce (2014) by Brazeau and Gladwin, The Ecology of Finnegans Wake (2015) by Lacivita, and the special issue of the JJQ on Joyce and Physiology (2009); in addition to recent developments in literary theory, such as, The Nonhuman Turn (Grusin, 2015), and the works of Deleuze, Derrida, Haraway, Bennett, and Hayles (to name a few). We believe the nonhuman turn is an especially appropriate methodology for the Joyce community (linking as it does animal studies, the posthuman and ecocriticism), allowing us to examine some neglected and unique aspects of Joyce’s oeuvre. The nonhuman turn provides a framework in which his interests in the potential sentience of rivers, machinery, and insects might speak to each other. <br /> <br />In furtherance of the increased importance of animal studies and the nonhuman turn, this issue seeks to place the works of James Joyce alongside these developments in a conceptualization that prioritizes both aspects of this theoretical paradigm. We welcome papers related to all aspects of animals and animality” from fleas to behemoth; worms to gulls; beast to beastly across the range of Joycean works. We particularly encourage papers that position animal studies/the nonhuman alongside ecocriticism, Marxism, queer studies, gender studies, technology studies, postcolonialism, posthumanism, psychoanalysis, or deconstruction. <br /> <br />Please send bios and abstracts of no more than 300 words to Katherine Ebury (k.ebury@sheffield.ac.uk) and Michelle Witen (michelle.witen@unibas.ch) by June 30, 2018. <br /> <br /> <br />Please find below our strict planned time scale for the issue. It goes without saying, but do only send us an abstract if this schedule looks doable for you. <br /> <br />May - June 2018 Open call for papers for issue (abstracts due June 30) <br /> <br />January 15, 2019 First submission of articles to editors <br /> <br />March 15, 2019 Editors return first round of submissions to contributors <br /> <br />May 15, 2019 Resubmission of articles to editors <br /> <br />May 31, 2019 Editors submit finalized issue to JJQ for Peer Review Process <br /> <br />August 30, 2019 Second round of revisions in response to editorial peer review <br /> <br />October 15, 2019 Final version of journal issue sent to JJQ (depending on peer review results) <br /> <br />

Conference Location: University of Tulsa , USA
Conference Starts: May 02, 2018
Conference Ends: June 30, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 30, 2018

For more information, contact: Katherine Ebury

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The Bildungsroman: Form and Transformations


The Bildungsroman: form and transformations http://bildungsroman.org <br /> <br />A conference hosted by the Novel Network at the University of Sydney, 22-25 November 2018 <br /> <br />This conference will explore the past and present condition of the Bildungsroman, with its myriad transformations and diversifications not only in the novel proper but also in memoir, film and long-form television. It will bring together exciting work in disciplines often separated by periodising and disciplinary paradigms and gather experts in prose fiction, film and television from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries and from a range of language areas to concentrate on this key narrative form. The novel of the emotional and social development or formation of a young person as they learn to make their way in an often hostile world, the Bildungsroman was a key form taken by the European novel from the early 19th century. How has it made its way across transhistorical formations and transgeneric remediations? <br /> <br />Keynotes: <br /> <br />Nancy Armstrong, Gilbert, Louis & Edward Lehrman Professor of English, Duke <br /> <br />Joseph Litvak, Professor of English and Chair of Department, Tufts <br /> <br />Katie Trumpener, Emily Sandford Professor of Comparative Literature and English, Yale <br /> <br />We invite proposals for individual papers, panels, roundtables and single text discussion sessions, on the following or other related topics. The panel format will involve pre-submission of the paper to ensure closer audience engagement with its arguments: <br /> <br />Theory and the bildungsroman <br /> <br />The bildungsroman, the künstlerroman, the erziehungsroman: overlaps and distinctions <br /> <br />The origins of the bildungsroman <br /> <br />The contemporary bildungsroman <br /> <br />The female bildungsroman <br /> <br />The queer bildungsroman <br /> <br />Gender in the bildungsroman <br /> <br />Narrative theory and the bildungsroman <br /> <br />Psychology and the bildungsroman <br /> <br />The postcolonial bildungsroman <br /> <br />The coming of age film as bildungsroman <br /> <br />The bildungsroman and television <br /> <br />The Bildungsroman and the city <br /> <br />Transnationalism and the bildungsroman <br /> <br />Memoir and the bildungsroman <br /> <br />The anti-bildungsroman <br /> <br />The eco-bildungsroman <br /> <br />200 word abstracts should be emailed by June 15 to vanessa.smith@sydney.edu.au.

Conference Location: Sydney, Australia
Conference Starts: November 22, 2018
Conference Ends: November 25, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 15, 2018

For more information, contact: Vanessa Smith

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Modern Institutions - M/m Print Plus Cluster


The following is a prospective peer-reviewed cluster on Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform <br /> <br />"Modern Institutions" <br /> <br />Editors: Caroline Z. Krzakowski, Northern Michigan University and Megan Faragher, Wright State University-Lake Campus <br /> <br />After using his position as PEN International's president to expel Nazi sympathizers from the organization in the 1930s, H.G. Wells drafted a new Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1940, arguing emphatically that dangerous political circumstances made it "imperative to adjust man's life and institutions." Facing times that are similarly troubled, we think now is a pivotal time to reconsider the engagement of modernism with, or even against, institutions and bureaucracies. <br /> <br />In the twentieth century, national and transnational institutions such as PEN International, UNESCO, and state actors such as the British Council transformed literature and culture. This prospective peer-reviewed cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform brings together brief position papers that define the aims and influences of institutions-whether private or public, national or transnational-and the relationship of these institutions to modernist aesthetics and practices. <br /> <br />Typically, scholarly discourse on the intersection of modernism and institutions has been dominated by Rainey's vision of modernism as a "strategy whereby the work of art solicits its commodification" through its integration "into a different economic pursuit of patronage, collecting, speculation, and investment" (5). As productive as these conversations have been, they have often stunted potential discussions of modernist interactions with institutions in their more everyday sense: governmental, bureaucratic and public institutions of all stripes that have often crossed paths with modernism in ways less concretely connected to the economics of modernism's self-commodification. <br /> <br />Contributions might address the following questions: <br /> <br />How does increasing bureaucratization impact the possibilities of aesthetic production? <br />What role have modern institutions played in creating reading publics and audiences? <br />How do bureaucrats defend or otherwise transform art from within institutions? <br />How do the interactions between cultural producers and institutions impact literary or artistic artifacts? <br /> <br />Examples of institutions include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />Radio networks (eg: BBC, CBS) <br />Governmental cultural agencies and initiatives (eg: The British Council, Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration) <br />Educational institutions (eg: Workers Educational Association) <br />Governing bodies or agencies (eg: Parliament, Congress) <br />International governmental bodies (eg: League of Nations) <br />International aesthetic institutions (eg: PEN International) <br />Governmental departments (eg: Office of War Information; Ministry of Information) <br />Non-profit institutions, both international and local (eg: UNESCO, The National Trust, NAACP) <br /> <br />Article lengths should be 2500-3000 words. Please email abstracts of 300-500 words to Caroline Z. Krzakowski ckrzakow@nmu.edu and Megan Faragher megan.faragher@wright.edu by June 1, 2018 <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: March 20, 2018
Conference Ends: June 01, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Caroline Krzakowski & Megan Faragher

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Modern Horizons June issue CFP - 'Authority and Transgression'


AUTHORITY & TRANSGRESSION (JUNE 2018) <br /> <br />Modern Horizons (www.modernhorizonsjournal.ca) invites submissions of essays on the theme of ‘Authority & Transgression’ for its June 2018 issue. <br /> <br />Ours is a particularly relevant time to think about authority and transgression in all of their given and potential forms. Politically, in local communities and globally, authority is undergoing a transformation, becoming less legitimate while at the same time becoming more powerful and violent. This is a dangerous trend for many reasons, one being that it skews and disfigures real, possible forms of authority. On the other hand, recent forms of transgression seem to betray the term’s etymology of going beyond or across rule, law and authority, and instead seek to destroy from within or subvert from below, forgoing any potential future benefits. One could call this a nihilistic form of transgression opposing a recklessly utopian, pseudo-fascist authority—to recall our 2016 conference theme. <br /> <br />While the current climate urgently calls for serious discussion of ideas and forms of authority and transgression, we should not limit our scope to the present. We wish to think about the ways authority and transgression are manifest historically. Is authority taken or granted? If so, who or what bestows authority? Does authority rely on time, as in tradition (cf. our 2015 issue “Conversations with Tradition”) or can it (ostensibly) appear without precedence? What are the personal and social benefits of having and/or adhering to authority? Can it be self-regulating, that is can authority safeguard itself from being abused, or is external moderation required? If so, where does this authority come from? Perhaps, to put it simply, transgression—and its possibility— is the only true form of regulating authority. Is this transgression’s only motivation? Does it have to be particular or is there such a thing a general transgression? What is its role in identity- and community-building? Is there such a thing as transgression for transgression’s sake? And, finally, what is at stake when it becomes authoritative, or rather authoritarian? <br /> <br />We are particularly interested in papers that address questions of authority and transgression outside of a strictly political realm. How can literature, film, painting, music, sculpture, dance, etc. offer alternative ways of thinking about authority and transgression? What does it mean to call an image or a text authoritative? In what ways has art been used and abused for authoritative and/or transgressive ends? In terms of spiritual life, while it is easy to find examples of authority gone awry, which forms of spiritual or theological authority maintain their vital presence and fulfill the old Greek sense of authority as ‘that which proceeds from the essence of the matter’? <br /> <br />When thinking about authority and transgression in these (perhaps) less pragmatic terms, one needs to address the question of limits and what is possible. It is too easy to define authority as that which sets limits, and transgression as that which crosses them. Authority, understood as the exercise of power and knowledge, transgresses that which precedes it; transgression adheres to an authority that is other than the one it exceeds. Is the idea of limit, then, what defines both authority and transgression as codependents bound by prescription? If so, limits seem to exist because of the possibility, real or imagined, of their invalidation. Hence the importance of literature and art for exploring the resilience of limits and the ways they are or may be transgressed. Historically, both authority and transgression have always been motivated by and have mobilized texts, images, ideas and language. How do they create or disavow meaning? Are certain forms of knowledge and/or esthetic expression/creation more likely to be authoritative? Transgressive? <br /> <br />Possible topics for presentations include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />-(mis)recognising forms of authority <br />-private and public transgression <br />-satire as positive transgression <br />-historical examinations and critiques of authority and its transgressors <br />-war as reinforcement of status quo <br />-the dangers of polemics <br />-monotheism and authority <br />-the health of boundaries/the boundaries of health <br />-delimitation as integrity <br />-feast, fest, carnival <br />-against critique: the inevitability of tradition <br />-maturity and immaturity <br />-transgression and transgredience <br />-ideas of congress, egress, redress <br />-when writers go ‘mad’ <br />-transgression, excitement, thrills, enthusiasm <br />-desire, obedience, submission <br /> <br />Please submit full papers to editors@modernhorizonsjournal.ca by 15 May, 2018. <br /> <br />Modern Horizons editors <br />Nicholas Hauck <br />Andrew Bingham <br />Ahmed Saad

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: June 01, 2018
Conference Ends: June 01, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Modern Horizons editors

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Vanguard U. (MSA 2018 seminar)


Vanguard U: Research Universities as Infrastructures of the Avant-Garde <br />Organizers: Joyce Tsai (University of Iowa) and Jennifer Buckley (University of Iowa) <br /> <br />The term “avant-garde” often conjures images of cultural radicals bucking tradition, agitating against the stifling confines of the academy and other institutions, and dismantling established traditions and values. Yet the constitution of any avant-garde is premised upon either the invention or (more often) the seizure and transformation of infrastructures of circulation – publications, exhibition spaces, teaching institutions, etc. – to disseminate their ideas, artworks, and activities. <br /> <br />With the exception of avowedly experimental institutions like Black Mountain College, the New School for Social Research, and Cal Arts, North American universities are not typically imagined as sites of vanguard activity, and scholars rarely consider the ways avant-garde thought and practice rely upon, transform, and even nurture existing public institutions. This seminar aims to account for the presence, practices, and legacies of avant-garde writers and artists in universities, particularly in large land-grant schools geographically far removed from long-established east- and west-coast urban centers of cultural production. <br /> <br />We invite papers that focus on research universities as incubators of avant-garde thought and practice, in the past, present, and future. How have universities (especially land-grant public universities), as both infrastructure and philosophical enterprise, advanced avant-garde ideas and practices in multiple, at times coordinated, domains -- for example, in collecting, teaching, and practice? <br /> <br />We intend for this discussion to constitute a significant contribution to ongoing interdisciplinary efforts to constitute a critical vanguard studies for the twenty-first century. <br /> <br />Papers might address: <br />- How aesthetic-political vanguards impacted state university student bodies, including programs of study, forms of affiliation and association, etc. <br /> --- Papers on artists and activists of color (for example, on the Black Arts Movement) are especially welcome. <br />- Departmental and cross- or extra-departmental initiatives that facilitate experimental arts practices (for example, the University of Iowa’s Experimental Theatre courses [1920s-40s] and Intermedia Program [1968-present]) <br /> ---Of particular interest are university-based arts “workshops” or “laboratories” created to function as incubators for experimental practices. <br />- How practitioners and researchers engage the expertise, equipment, and other resources at research universities to advance their projects. <br /> ---For example, how would our understanding of experiments in art and technology in postwar art potentially shift if universities, and not just private corporations, gained prominence in interpretations of this material? <br /> --- What aspects of vanguard activity can the research university catalyse or support that other institutions or networks cannot? <br />- Individual or associated avant-garde artists who taught at, were commissioned by, and/or formally visited state universities. <br />- How university-based performing arts presenters and venues have introduced local and regional audiences to experimental performance practices. <br />- How university libraries and museums have collected, housed, conserved, and provided access to avant-garde art, in every medium. <br />- How does the presence of avant-garde repositories activate, or otherwise enable, asynchronous models of interpretation and practice? <br />- How universities have funded experimental arts practices (for example, with individual donations, university endowments, or outside grants derived from federal, state, or private sources). <br />- University-based initiatives that support scholarship on the avant-gardes. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Jen Buckley

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Fashion as Expression and Activism


South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) 90: Fighters from the Margins: Socio-Political Activists and Their Allies <br />November 2-4, 2018,† Sheraton Birmingham in Birmingham, Alabama <br /> <br />Fashion as Expression and Activism <br /> <br />It has been over twenty-five years since Valerie Steele published "The F Word" (1991) in Lingua Franca in which she argued that scholarly inquiry of fashion was nearly anathema in academe. Roughly a decade later, however, in the survey, Fashion (2003), Christopher Breward cited a wealth of academic study of fashion in various fields. The new millennium has brought a welcome rise of publication in this area showing that fashion, dress, design, and style are important means of expression-both at the individual and collective levels-and deserving of critical inquiry. In acknowledgement of the SAMLA 90 Conference theme, "Fighters from the Margins: Socio-Political Activists and Their Allies," this panel calls for papers that consider fashion as a means not only of personal expression, but also of social reform, activism, or as a manifestation of avant-garde ideology. The theme of revolution is particularly relevant for dress, which “links the biological body to the social being, and public to private” (Elizabeth Wilson, Adorned in Dreams, 1985), underscoring clothing's relationship to political change. Papers on dress reform, anti-fashion, and various kinds of fashion (or fashionable) activism during the Victorian, Modern, or contemporary eras are welcome, as are papers that address avant-garde movements in fashion. We also encourage submissions that examine sartorial themes in literature, theater, art, film, photography, design, periodicals, digital media, and other aesthetic modes of expression. Questions that might be addressed include: <br />- When and why have fashion and dress been used in experimental ways and as a means to shape not only the body but also to speak to social issues and to shape the wider culture? <br />- How effective is fashionable activism? What are the movements and social formations showing meaningful connections between aesthetics and politics, particularly as related to dress? <br />- How have experimental, unconventional, and/or avant-garde movements and designs in dress and fashion been used to address political and societal concerns? <br />- Where does fashion intersect with local, national, or global conversations on change? <br /> <br />By May 25, 2018, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to both Loretta Clayton, Middle Georgia State University, at loretta.clayton@mga.edu and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, at papalasm@ecu.edu.

Conference Location: Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Conference Starts: November 02, 2018
Conference Ends: November 04, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: May 25, 2018

For more information, contact: Marylaura Papalas

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Afrographics: Visual Cultures of Black Modernism (MSA Columbus)


Afrographics: Visual Cultures of Black Modernism (MSA Columbus) <br /> <br /> <br />CFP, 2018 Modernist Studies Association conference (“Graphic Modernisms”) <br /> <br />Panel proposal for MSA Columbus, November 8-11 2018 <br /> <br />Visual culture played a central role in black modernist literary production and in the construction of blackness in modernist literature more broadly. Instances of this role are many: the drawings that framed the publication Fire!, Aaron Douglas’s stunning WPA murals, Carl Van Vechten’s portraits of young Harlem writers, the optical literary form that structures Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, Frantz Fanon’s visual description of “the fact of blackness,” and primitivist depictions of blackness in modernist art. Across all of these instances, the visual and literary feature what Miriam Thaggert refers to as “a dynamic present within early black modernism that is characterized by a heightened attention to and experimentation with visual and verbal techniques for narrating and representing blackness” (Images of Black Modernism 3). Our panel seeks to explore how this dynamic remains central to studies of the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance. We invite paper proposals that address the imbrications of visual and literary cultures of the Harlem Renaissance, broadly conceived. <br /> <br />Please submit a 250 word abstract and a short bio to Kelly Hanson (hansonkr@indiana.edu) and Savannah Hall (savhall@indiana.edu) by Saturday, April 21, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 21, 2018

For more information, contact: Kelly Hanson

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Science vs. Fiction


Science vs. Fiction <br /> <br />C. P. Snow’s now-famous mid-century argument that science and literature refer to two separate intellectual cultures emerged during a period in which the sciences were increasingly under the sway of empirical and positivistic methodologies. Science and literature were understood as polarized fields. Behaviorist psychology wanted to reduce mental features to observable physical correlates, which left fiction as an archive for the articulation of mental life. Although many scholars have now pointed out that the rhetorical polarization of these two domains at mid-century was never complete, narratives of modernism still tend towards a telos in which science and literature come, slowly, to be separated and opposed. This panel proposes to explore ways in which modernist literature troubles that narrative, offering different possibilities for approaching modernist fiction’s involvement with science. Because writers were composing during a period in which science and fiction were entangled but not fully cast in oppositional terms, they offer resources for thinking about life and the mind in less reductively materialist terms. <br /> <br />Interested panelists please send a 250 word abstract of a planned talk and a short bio to Václav Paris: vaclavparis@gmail.com

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2018

For more information, contact: Vaclav Paris

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Modernist Plant Aesthetics


The pages of modernist literary works abound with leaves, plants, and flowers. These plants are more than mere appearances; indeed, their presence often facilitates connections between characters and their ecosystems, prompt questions of human agency, and anticipate questions of ecological sustainability in an era of industrial development. This plant life is sensuous, for example, in Felix’s first glimpse of Robin Vote in Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1936), Robin is “surrounded by a confusion of potted plants, exotic palms and cut flowers.” The “jungle” that surrounds her creeps onto her body, as “her flesh was the texture of plant life.” Modernism’s plant life also invokes questions of ethics and shared earthliness: “the force that through the green fuse drives the flower” in Dylan Thomas’s eponymous poem (1934) famously connects the (human) speaker to a shared mortality. Septimus Smith, in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway (1925) imagines a web-like connection to the ecosystems of London: “leaves were alive, trees were alive. And the leaves being connected by millions of fibers with his own body,” a connection which prompts him to realize that “men must not cut down trees.” In a similar vein, Patrick Kavanagh considers the violence done to wild, weedy plant life through farming when he writes in The Great Hunger (1942) that “Nobody will ever know how much tortured poetry the/ pulled weeds on the ridge wrote/ Before they withered in the July sun.” Taking this ecological imposition to its full conclusion, the central crisis in Samuel Beckett’s play Endgame (1957) is that plant seeds have failed to sprout. <br />The questions and possibilities raised by plant life and death in literary modernism compellingly anticipate the stakes of contemporary critical plant studies. Here, scholars including Michael Marder, Jeffrey Nealon, Catriona Sandilands, Timothy Morton, and Luce Irigaray (among others) have turned to plants in order to critique Enlightenment tenets of the “great chain of being” as well as the exploitation and instrumentalization of biota; to explore the difficulty of language in expressing or translating nonhuman communication, especially through symbolism and metaphor; and question passivity as a form of activity or agency. Most important in these discussions is the exhortation to move beyond the focus on individual plants (and their genetic makeup) in laboratory settings, and to consider plants in their ecosystems. Moreover, critical plant studies attempts to foreground “plantness:” what do plants say about themselves? This panel aims to bring together modernist literature (as well as visual, musical or performative works) and plant studies to highlight the ways in which this movement is in step with contemporary environmental humanities and science, but also its proleptic concern with anthropogenic climate change, and nonhuman modes of affiliation and expression. <br />This panel will explore (but is not limited to) these questions or concerns: different modes of nonhuman animacy/agency; vegetation as form; plant symbolism; botany, biochemistry and taxonomy; plant-based folk-knowledge, medicine, and spirituality; depictions of agricultural space and/or labor; biosemiotics and plant communication; the aesthetic and sensorial worlds of plants. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2018

For more information, contact: Caitlin McIntyre

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Modernism's Constraining Forms


CFP: Modernism's Constraining Forms <br />Proposed Panel for MSA 20 <br />November 8-11, 2018; Columbus, Ohio <br /> <br />In a recent issue of PMLA, Caroline Levine reiterates her stance from Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (2015), saying "agency is dramatically constrained by shapes and arrangements -- from built spaces to racial hierarchies to our body’s rhythms." While, for her, one cannot work outside such arrangements, she insists that "people can wield agency within and by way of constraining forms," frequently using other forms to unsettle hierarchies and interrupt routines. This panel proposes tracking the ways in which modernist writers, and contemporary writers in modernism's wake, have registered constraining forms, done things with them (subversively, ironically, transformatively), and interrogated the possibility of transcending them. If, as Levine contends, forms can be, at once, containing, plural, overlapping, portable, and situated, how have artists and critics diagnosed, "graphed," and harnessed their productive capacities, particularly in ways that reconfigure relations in and among such spheres as aesthetics, politics, epistemology, ethics, and history? <br /> <br />Like Levine's, our understanding of "forms" is capacious and contextually variable, shaping practices that range from poetics and criticism to curation and teaching, from urban design to social formation -- though this is hardly exhaustive. We thus welcome proposals that address modernism's constraining forms in a variety of contexts and registers. Topics might include (but are not limited to) forms such as: literary genre, formal techniques, and tradition; literary reading, reception, and criticism; pedagogy, epistemology, ethics; urban spaces, social forms and hierarchies, nationhood; affect and the everyday. We especially seek papers that examine such forms in a way that speaks to modernism's ongoing struggle with its own constraints or the complex legacies of modernism's work with and through constraining forms -- both then and now, both in creative production and criticism. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of 200-250 words and a brief bio to Michael Subialka (msubialka@ucdavis.edu) and Kelly Walsh (kswalsh@yonsei.ac.kr) by April 5, 2018. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2018

For more information, contact: Kelly Walsh

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The Visual Lives of Poems


This panel explores the rich, multiform intersections between modern American poetry, visuality, and visual cultures. How were poems mediated by visual technologies like film and photography? What do print practices that combine poetry with visual art have to tell us about verse cultures in the first half of the century? And how did poems remediate and engage with visual culture? Building on scholarship that has expanded our understanding of modern American poetries beyond the easy binaries of high versus popular modernisms and genteel versus avant-garde traditions, this panel seeks to cut across these classifications and instead consider modern American poetries as, in part, an engagement with the provocations and possibilities of visual media. <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstract and brief bio to Caroline Gelmi (cgelmi@umassd.edu) by April 5, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2018

For more information, contact: Caroline Gelmi

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Modernism's Graphic Women


In her book Graphic Women: Life Narrative and Contemporary Comics, Hillary L. Chute argues that graphic narratives by women are invested in an “ethics of testimony” and assume the “risk of representation.” According to Chute, writers like Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Phoebe Gloeckner, Lynda Barry, Marjane Satrapi, and Alison Bechdel “revisit” and “repicture” life narratives not as a form of catharsis or didacticism but rather as “textual” and “material” testimonies thereby provoking us “to think about how women, as both looking and looked-at subjects are situated in particular times, spaces, and histories.” In addition, says Chute, they ask us to “rethink the dominant tropes of unspeakability, invisibility, and inaudibility that have tended to characterize trauma theory as well as our current censorship-driven culture in general." <br /> <br />Long before Chute’s contemporary graphic women began “complexly visualizing” their lives and experiences, Modernist women like Djuna Barnes (i.e. Ladies Almanack; Ryder; The Book of Repulsive Women), Stevie Smith (i.e. Collected Poems; Me Again: Illustrated by Herself), Leonora Carrington (i.e. The Hearing Trumpet) The Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven (i.e. Body Sweats: The Uncensored Writings of…), Claude Cahun (i.e. Disavowals), and others had already written graphic narratives, thus themselves bravely and audaciously taking on the “risk of representation.” <br /> <br />This panel seeks to examine the work of Modernism’s graphic women and will consider, but not be limited to, questions like the following: How are modernist women employing the graphic (broadly understood) in their work and to what end? How might we define the relationship between life narrative and the graphic (again considered broadly) in these women’s texts? Do these women’s graphic narratives, like those considered by Chute, also speak to dominant tropes associated with trauma and the theory thereof? Or, on a less serious note, are they relying on a comic interface between text and image that could be said to reconfigure scenes of domesticity and/or more conservative notions of gender, sexuality, and female subjectivity? How might graphic texts by these Modernist women offer up an earlier form of what Chute refers to as “feminist graphic knowledge”? How do these texts define and articulate such knowledge and in what contexts? How do graphic texts by these women offer a new spin on the personal is political? What kind of visual intervention in their own historical, political, and cultural moments do these women’s graphic narratives offer? And finally, borrowing on Rita Felski’s notion of a “neo-phenomenology” as laid out in the Introduction to her book Uses of Literature (2008), how does the interface between text and image in Modernism's graphic women’s texts offer a “thick description of experiential states” that induce moments of recognition in us as readers but also shock, enchant, and engage our sensibilities to the extent we are taken to what Felski, in more recent work, refers to as “the limits of critique”? <br /> <br />Please send a 250 to 300 word proposal with short bio to Kimberly Engdahl Coates (kimbec@bgsu.edu) by April 3, 2018. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2018

For more information, contact: Kimberly Engdahl Coates

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Constitutional Modernisms


'Matters of the state and state building,' as Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz wrote one decade ago, have received concerted attention in the new modernist studies. However, much of that attention has preserved the unilateral and agonistic model of influence sketched by Mao and Walkowitz, which is concerned primarily with œ'the effects of the state on modernist production' and modernist efforts to elude or to intervene in 'œpolitics as such.' <br /> <br />This panel will explore new models of influence and intervention, building on recent work by Michael Gardiner, Ravit Reichman, John Marx, Sascha Bru, Aarthi Vadde, Timothy Hyde, and others to consider modernism’s relationship to the putative hallmark of the modern state: constitutional governance. <br /> <br />Preference will be given to proposals that use specific examples and case studies to address broad theoretical, conceptual, and methodological questions, such as: <br /> <br />- Can literature introduce new forms of government? <br />- How do modernist actors and institutions participate in the art of governance? <br />- How do modernist cultures produce or channel constitutional change (formal or informal)? <br />- Which constitutional priniciples or arrangements are endorsed by modernist manifestos and avant-garde movements? <br />- What legal norms, demographic changes, and territorial alignments does modernism mediate? <br />- What does modernism contribute to the writing, revision, or destruction of state constitutions? <br />- What are the aesthetic, rhetorical, and figurative conceits of modern constitutionalism? <br />- How are states affected by the non-governmental and/or transnational character of modernist cultural production? <br /> <br />Please send 200-300 word abstract and brief bio to Ryan Weberling (ryanweb@bu.edu) by April 1. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 02, 2018

For more information, contact: Ryan Weberling

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Mapping Modernist Poems


This panel seeks to explore the relevance of maps, charts, graphs, and scores as elements of modernist poetry or as ways of conceptualizing the poetic process. How have poets incorporated such graphic practices into their compositions and to what ends? Alternatively, how have authors described their poetic processes in terms of graphic designs, and what visual sources or models have informed such poetries? Which modernist practices of this kind have been carried forward into postmodern poetries? Papers might fruitfully explore the formal implications of such questions and/or their relevance to twentieth century visual and sound culture, systems of data-gathering, geographies, information processing and display. <br /> <br />Please e-mail 300-word abstracts and brief (1 paragraph) bios to Zachary Finch (D.Zachary.Finch@mcla.edu) or Stacy Hubbard (sch1@buffalo.edu) by March 15th. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Zachary Finch

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Modernist Fashion Systems and Networks


MSA 2018: "Graphic Modernisms" <br />Panel proposal-Visual cultures stream <br />Title: Fashion Systems and Networks <br />Chair: Dr. Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University <br /> <br />Roland Barthes' "The Fashion System" (1973), a critical study underscoring the legitimacy of fashion as a discipline of academic inquiry, highlights the importance of visual culture and especially the relationship between its graphic and textual representations. Barthes' analysis also illuminates the complexity of the fashion "system," and the many layers of meaning that text and image construct. This interdisciplinary panel invites papers that explore these webs of mediation in modernist fashion magazines or descriptions of fashion in modernist works. This panel also solicits papers that understand the concept of "fashion system" more broadly, as a network of components that negotiate and exchange meaning. This includes contributions that explore the significance of artistic collaboration, the sharing of ideas across ideological, geographical, and disciplinary boundaries, and the impact of social, aesthetic, and professional networks on designers, their creations, and the fashion industry at large. <br /> <br />Possible questions may include: <br /> <br />-What are the different definitions of "system" and "network" within the discipline of Fashion Studies and how do alternative relationships exist within these frameworks? <br />-How is the avant-garde, defined by its international interconnectedness, especially conducive to facilitating networks in fashion? <br />-What kinds of relationships emerge by examining: the sartorial image and its textual representation; dress and gender identity; clothing and the sensory experience; the newly fashionable and the outmoded; the work of art and the fashion industry? <br />-How does modernist fashion engage in the crosspollination of ideas across a variety of disciplines and fields, including literature, graphic art, film, popular media, design, architecture, and dance? <br />-What kind of networks (social, media, information) engage with, shape or transform the development of modernist fashion? <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract with short bio to Marylaura Papalas (papalasm@ecu.edu) by April 1, 2018. <br /> <br />Marylaura Papalas <br />Assistant Professor, French <br />Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures <br />East Carolina University <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Marylaura Papalas

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MSA Columbus: Remaking Empathy, Immersion, and Allure


Are there peculiarly modern ways of inciting empathy, of casting the spell of one life over another? If modern life and its culture industries are afflicted by disenchantment, inoculated by irony or exposed by estrangement effects, then in what ways do modernist writers and artists also seek to capture and immerse their audiences in lives strange to their own? What aesthetics are thus created, and what cognitive processes are engaged? Ecocriticism has revived the ambivalent value of enchantment and wonder, while affect studies has explored caring and compassion among problematic aims in modern cultural production. In these contexts, how do avant-garde modernist practices converge or diverge from the spellbinding work of popular entertainment and other media? What are the implications for empathic horror versus pleasure, knowledge versus stupefaction, empowerment versus paralysis? This proposed panel seeks papers from diverse disciplines on experiments with empathy, immersion and allure in literature, arts, and media. <br /> <br />Please send a 200-300 word proposal with brief professional biographical notes to Glenn Willmott at gw12@queensu.ca. Due April 1, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Glenn Willmott

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Modernist Alternatives to Heroism


How does modernism address the contradiction between popular celebration of the heroic individual and the ongoing erosion of the autonomous individual as a meaningful concept? What attempts are made to articulate a heroism consistent with fragmented, incoherent, anti-Cartesian individual or one compatible with the denial of the self? What would a modern hero or heroine in concert with postmodern cultural theory look like? How does the modern hero or heroine correspond to crossings of genres and media, especially in the digital age? Are graphic heroes and heroines somehow substantially different from traditional ones, and can a theory by elaborated to account for that difference? In short, how has the Western hero evolved since Joyce, Wolfe, Faulkner and other modernist icons? Counter-tradition approaches to the heroic such as ambiguous, anarchist, decentered, dystopian, mystic, pansexual, paranormal posthuman, or virtual (digital), with a focus on the Americas are especially welcome.

Conference Location: Columbus OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 11, 2018
Conference Ends: November 18, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Todd Garth

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Modernism and the New Materialisms


If ecocriticism was slow in coming to modernist studies, it has arrived with a bang in the last several years. At least four monographs that combine modernist archives with ecocritical approaches have been published since 2015, and special issues of both Modernism/modernity and Twentieth Century Literature in the same period have dedicated themselves to ecology, the nonhuman, the inhuman, and the posthuman. One key ingredient in modernist studies's belated adoption of ecocritical concerns has been the suite of theoretical works referred to under the umbrella of "New Materialisms," a point made by both Jeffery Mathes McCarthy and Kelly Sultzbach in their respective ecocritical monographs. The New Materialisms' focus on the agency of matter, rather than more traditional ecocritical concerns like wilderness, nature, the "local," and so on, has been a fruitful tool with which to think through the nonhuman politics of modernist texts that are often avowedly urban, cosmopolitan, or otherwise unconcerned with the "green" themes that occupied ecocritics of the 1990s and 2000s. <br /> <br />2018, however, marks the ten-year anniversary of Alaimo and Hekman's collection Material Feminisms, where many of the thinkers and ideas that would come to constitute the "New Materialisms" were first brought together between two covers. This panel proposes to analyze and re-evaluate the relationship between modernist studies and the New Materialisms, particularly in light of recent critics of the movement who argue that the "nonhuman turn," in the words of Julian Murphet, embraces an "ontological enthusiasm . . . [that] amounts, in fact, to a species of ideological quietism." Modernist studies itself once faced similar accusations of political quietism, and because of this modernist studies has evolved into a complex and politically engaged discipline that is well suited to tackling the thorny issues surrounding New Materialist theory. How, for example, might we discuss material agency in the modernist period in the context of the suffrage movement--itself a struggle to gain political agency--or the continued disenfranchisement of African Americans under Jim Crow? What are the roles of machines and mechanization in modernist representations of material agency? What is the role of primitivism in modernist accounts of nonhuman agency? How might New Materialisms help us understand 20th century popular culture, rather than only canonized "high" modernists? This panel seeks papers that respond to these, or any other questions, that might enrich and complicate our understanding of the relationship between New Materialist theory and modernist art. <br /> <br />Please submit 300 word abstracts and a short bio to Kyle Murdock (kyle.murdock@mail.utoronto.ca) by April 1, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Kyle Murdock

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Modernism and the Matter of Infrastructure


Modernism and the Matter of Infrastructure <br /> <br />"What does it mean to be stuck dreaming of infrastructure?"€ asked Patricia Yaeger in a 2007 special issue of _PMLA_ dedicated to the special topic of "Cities."€ The critical possibilities that Yaeger's prompt opens up--along with related questions and issues--have gained currency with the development of infrastructure as a focus of recent scholarly interest from multidisciplinary perspectives. A 2015 special issue of _Modern Fiction Studies_ defined infrastructuralism and delineated modernist studies as a site conducive to this line of critical inquiry. The aim of this MSA 2018 panel is to extend the line further by pursuing a range of possible topics, including but not limited to the following: <br /> <br />--graphic forms of infrastructure in modernism (elements of design, displays and exhibitions, visual culture) <br />--interdisciplinary approaches to modernism and infrastructuralism <br />--infrastructure and temporality <br />--infrastructure and the production of space <br />--the (in)visibility of infrastructure in works of modernism <br />--ecocritical approaches to modernism and infrastructuralism <br />--infrastructures of feeling (monumentalism, nationalism, the technological sublime, etc.) <br />--rural/urban forms of infrastructure <br />--utopian/dystopian renderings of infrastructure <br />--the infrastructural dimensions of empire, colonization, and (uneven) economic development <br />--the role of infrastructure in relations between modernism and political ideologies or the state (progressivism, fascism, the New Deal, regional planning/rehabilitation, global development initiatives, etc.) <br /> <br />Please submit a 300-word abstract and brief bio to Ted Atkinson (tba34@msstate.edu) by April 1, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Ted Atkinson

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MSA Columbus: Modernism and the Form of Community


This panel proposes to revisit the concept of community and treat it as a lens through which both established and recent trends in modernist studies might be redirected and refocused. For instance, following the so-called 'global turn', what modernist forms - political, aesthetic - might do justice to the scale of community: part and whole, molecular and molar? And just how large (city, nation, globe, planet?) and small (the individual, the mark on the wall?) does this form scale up and down? Or considering the 'affective turn': in what forms might the body's vicissitudes and cognition be reconciled with the conscious collective action of agents? And how do the more familiar loci of modernist studies - space and time, difference and identity, totality and fragment - return in such negotiations? <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary approaches welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-300 word abstract with short bio to David Sergeant (david.sergeant@plymouth.ac.uk) by April 1, 2018. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: David Sergeant

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Peripheral Walls: Poster Art and the Critical Delineation of Modernism


Writing in the English magazine The Poster in 1899, French critic Maurice Demeur declared: "In the course of my studies of pictorial placards, I have often had cause to deplore in the art magazines the almost entire absence of comment on mural decorative art in Spain. Hardly anything, it would seem, is written about Spanish posters and colour prints. What is the reason of this neglect of so characteristic and remarkable a decorative impulse? . . . I am surprised to see that Boudet in his book Les Affiches Etrangeres, Sponsel in his clever publication Das Moderne Plakat, and many other writers have entirely ignored the subject. Does this arise from lack of knowledge or negligence? In any case it is unpardonable."€ Ongoing geographical, disciplinary, and vertical (high/popular culture) expansions in the field of modernist studies make Demeur's remarks particularly relevant. This panel seeks to echo their sentiment and invites papers that engage (the critical exclusion of) posters produced in peripheral territories. Can the history of posters constitute a fruitful locus from which to investigate and critique the construction of hegemonic Modernism? What critical vantage points may the study of the formation of graphic canons offer over that of literary ones? What poster traditions have postcolonial, transnational, or global approaches failed to include? And what does this cultural production teach us about modernisms and modernities? <br /> <br />Please send a 200-300 word abstract and a short bio to Carles Ferrando Valero (cferrandovalero@ucmerced.edu) by April 1, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 10, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Carles Ferrando Valero

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MSA 2018 Columbus: The Graphic Body


The Graphic Body <br /> <br />What makes a body graphic? When is a body ‘too much’? Who decides when a body is ‘too much’? The modernist period is filled with a fascination for bodies that are too sexual, too dirty, too ‘deformed’, too violent, too dangerous. From Rainer Maria Rilke’s bodies in Die Aufzeichnungen des Malte Laurids Brigge scraping themselves against walls, over Vaslav Nijinsky’s masturbatory finale in l’après-midi d’un faune to Isadora Duncan’s thinly veiled Greek dances, ‘graphic’ bodies – purposefully or not – provoked responses of discomfort, distrust, and disgust. We invite papers that explore the ways in which bodies are shaped and re-shaped, by the artists and their audience alike, as ‘graphic’. While we welcome cross-disciplinary approaches, we wish to focus on dance and physical performance, and the responses of the other arts to the specific immediacy of this present body in motion. Through this panel, we hope to think through the concept of the ‘graphic’ body in its vividness and explicitness in contrast and relation to other understandings of the non-normative body, such as the grotesque. In this attempt, we hope to draw from a variety of contexts and we therefore explicitly encourage diverse viewpoints that go beyond Western perspectives.  <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and short bio to Meindert E. Peters (meindert.peters@new.ox.ac.uk) and Patty Argyrides (14pa6@queensu.ca) by 1 April 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Patty Argyrides

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MSA 2018 Columbus: Graphic Sound


"Graphic Sound" <br />2018 Modernist Studies Association Conference <br />8-11 November 2018 <br />Columbus, OH <br /> <br />In their introduction to ‘Sounding Modernism: Rhythm and Sonic Mediation in Modern Literature and Film’ (2017), Julian Murphet, Helen Groth, and Penelope Hone suggest that the advent of new sound storage technologies encouraged modernist authors "to engage as never before with what the symbolic apparatus of written language had never yet properly grasped: the vocal textures, rhythmic mechanisations, and stochastic accidents of real, socially embodied sound" (3). Their volume goes a long way in addressing the need in both sound and modernist studies for more direct engagements with the ways in which the printed word mediates the rhythms and sonic textures of modernity and accesses historical and cultural modes of listening. This panel seeks to build upon their work by further examining modern literature's textual registration of sonic phenomena. <br /> <br />We invite papers that explore modern literature's mediation of sound, particularly those that consider the ways in which it attempts to go beyond sonic description and mimesis by grappling with sound's synesthetic emergence in and through the printed word and by imagining how it can be "heard" through various graphic registers. Possible topics might include the following: <br /> <br />• Narrative sound <br />• Synesthesia in modernist works <br />• Phonemic writing <br />• Voice in modern literature <br />• The inner voice and the audibility of reading <br />• The influence of sound technologies on modern literature <br />• Silence, soundless sounds, and the Real <br />• Representing deafness and registering hearing along an audiological spectrum (including an attention to "infrasound," "bass materialism," and other means of hearing-as-feeling or -seeing) <br />• Audiobooks and print-to-audio or audio-to-print remediation <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and short bio to Jennifer Janechek at jennifer-yirinec@uiowa.edu no later than April 1, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Jennifer Janechek

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Modernism and Talk


Talk is a useful but under-theorized category for investigating what Michael North describes as modernism's "€œinsurrectionary opposition to the known and familiar in language."€ Perhaps its most recognizable mode within the academy is gossip, but other forms of talk--€”chatter, banter, prattle, chit-chat, and dialect--not only structure dialogue within the novel but also comprise an important site of North's "€œscene of the modern." <br /> <br />This panel proposes to explore talk and enduring critical concerns of modernist literary and cultural studies. How, for example, does modernism's entanglements with various standards extend to the verbal? In what ways can talk inform our discussion of subjectivity and/or alienation? What work is made possible by approaching celebrity culture through gossip? How did various technologies affect verbal communication, and, in turn, how were media advancements informed by preexisting talk protocols? Is "talk"€ a useful category within global modernism? How does talk further disrupt oppositional critical framings such as elite/mass culture, serious/trivial, and high/middlebrow? <br /> <br />Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a short bio to Krista Daniel (kzd0008@uw.edu) by April 1, 2018. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Krista Daniel

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Modernist Women, War, and the Graphic


From state-sponsored propaganda to cartoons, photography, and cinema newsreels, the cultural and political work done in service of modern warfare is significantly visual. At the same time (and despite considerable efforts to also subdue this aspect of war), much of the material reality depicted is inescapably explicit and brutal: broken bodies, destroyed cities, devastated natural environments. <br /> <br />As scholars like Trudi Tate and Marina MacKay have established, the traumatic nature of modern warfare, which is at once intensely visual and violently explicit, elicits a preoccupation with the act of bearing witness in much modernist fiction and poetry. While significant work has been done to re-evaluate the work of female artists working during and after war in terms of such a preoccupation, we want to invite papers that further explore the relationship between women's unique experience of war and their perceptions of the graphic. <br /> <br />Questions for consideration may include but are not limited to the following: <br /> <br />How do elements of the graphic, broadly defined, feature in the writing of women about war? <br /> <br />How do female artists examine the explicit nature of war, particularly when they were often considered unsuited to do so because they had not fought? <br /> <br />How do female artists negotiate attempts to shield them from the horrors of war? How do they depict the imperative to restore the nation to physical and moral health? How might they explore or communicate their resistance or disillusion with such a project? <br /> <br />How do women interrogate or remix propaganda? <br /> <br />How does the violent or graphic become imposed on domestic scenes? <br /> <br />How do racial, ethnic, cultural, economic contexts intersect with gender in the portrayal of the graphic? How are female artists' portrayals of the graphic informed by their individual or collective backgrounds and identities? <br /> <br />Please send a 250 to 300 word abstract with short bio to Stephanie Byttebier (sbytteb@bu.edu) and Kate Nash (kmnash@bu.edu) by April 1, 2018. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Kate Nash

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MSA 2018 (Columbus): (Re)Mapping and (Re)Imagining Fascist Modernisms


(Re)Mapping and (Re)Imagining Fascist Modernisms <br /> <br />As the widespread circulation of works bearing such names as Fables of Aggression: Wyndham Lewis, The Modernist as Fascist (1978); Fascist Modernities (2001); and Modernism and Fascism: The Sense of a Beginning under Mussolini and Hitler (2007) attest, fascism is intimately bound with and to modernism; however, studies of modernism and fascism have often been, like studies of fascism, nationally bounded-engaging with the ways in which fascist modernisms emerge in England or Italy or Germany or France, but often neglecting the discourse and cultural transactions occurring among them. <br /> <br />In Transatlantic Fascism: Ideology, Violence, and the Sacred in Argentina and Italy, 1914-1945 (2010), the historian Frederico Finchelstein recovers the transnational dimensions of fascism, calling upon scholars to consider "fascist ideology a global phenomenon" (10); as he argues, fascism's knowledge production and, ultimately, its greatest crime, the Holocaust, all occur across as well as within national borders. Continuing Finchelstein's project of remapping fascism, this panel asks cultural scholars to engage the cultural imaginary out of which fascist desire emerges not merely within national boundaries but rather to think about their development as they move across them. How do texts crystallize or develop fascist desire across national boundaries? How did texts imagine transnational fascist desire? <br /> <br />This panel is interested in treatments of fascist imaginaries that engage with its literary as well as visual dimensions. Along with considering how fascist culture emerges among and across European nations, this panel welcomes papers on how European fascist culture informs the imaginaries of North and South America and how North and South American culture might have contributed to European fascist culture. <br /> <br />Please submit an abstract of 250 words, along with a brief bio, to sibernst@usc.edu. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Sanders I Bernstein

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Modernism and Religious Visual Culture


This proposed panel for the Modernist Studies Association’s 2018 conference in Columbus, Ohio, November 8-11, seeks to expand on recent work in modernism and religion—from Pericles Lewis, Justin Neuman, and Matthew Mutter, among others—by exploring how modernist writers responded to, incorporated, or shaped religious visual culture, defined broadly. If modernist literary production was much more concerned with questions of religion than past scholarship has allowed, what role did religious visual culture play in shaping that engagement? Did modernist writers adapt or incorporate the religious visual culture of the early twentieth century? Did they shape it or produce new examples of it themselves? How do these encounters change our understanding of modernism and religion as well as our understanding of the religious itself? <br /> <br />Please send a brief abstract of 250-300 words and a short bio to Jack Dudley at dudley@msmary.edu by April 1, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2018

For more information, contact: Jack Dudley

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MSA Columbus: Suicidal Modernisms


In Andrew Bennett'€™s recently published Suicide Century (2017), the author writes that suicide "€œstreams like a poison through the tainted life blood of the modernist literary canon." And yet work on modernism and suicide is scarce; in fact, work on "€œliterary suicidology" more generally has not matched the subject'€™s importance to our field. This panel would like to build on the work of Bennett and a few others (Al Alvarez, Jeffrey Berman) and examine the representation and non-representation of suicide in modernist texts. <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary approaches as well as proposals that concern underrepresented writers are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract with short bio to Aaron Botwick (abotwick@gradcenter.cuny.edu) by March 31, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2018

For more information, contact: Aaron Botwick

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Modernism and/in Comics


CFP for MSA Columbus: <br /> <br />Modernism and/in Comics <br /> <br />The advent of industrial modernity in the west and of global modernities outside the west helped birth not only the canonical productions of “high modernism” and the myriad other modernisms recovered in the wake of the New Modernist studies, but also the immensely popular medium of the comics: political cartoons, newspaper strips, comic books, graphic narratives, etc. This panel seeks to explore various intersections, collaborations, and exchanges between modernism and the comics, including modernist comics, portrayals of modernism in comics, responses of modernists to comics, appropriations of comics by modernists, or the aesthetic legacies of modernism in comics. <br /> <br />Please e-mail 300-word abstracts and brief bios to Paul Peppis (ppeppis@uoregon.edu) by March 31st. 

Conference Location: Columbus OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2018

For more information, contact: Paul Peppis

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Word, Image, Narrative


The early years of the twentieth century saw a burgeoning interest in inter-art aesthetics, as modernist authors became increasingly interested in visual representations in or of their works and visual artists worked regularly on the production of books. This panel seeks to address visual/verbal representation in its myriad guises: illustrated novels or illustrated editions of novels, inter-art collaborations, artists’ books, graphic narratives, etc. How did Woolf’s relationship with her sister, the painter Vanessa Bell, inform her practice of literary description? What was the aesthetic value, if any, of Matisse’s notoriously bad illustrations of Ulysses? How did Stein’s relationship with Picasso inform their respective portraits? What is the relationship between image and narrative in the surrealist collage novels of Max Ernst, or the woodcut novels of Lynd Ward? <br /> <br />Please email 300 word abstracts and short bios to Jon Najarian (joncn@bu.edu) by 31 March.

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2018

For more information, contact: Jon Najarian

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Graphing the Self: Modern Poetry and Portraiture


From Gertrude Stein's portrait poems, to TS Eliot's and William Carlos Williams' own "Portrait(s) of a Lady," the idea of portraiture captivated the imagination of many modernist poets. This sensibility extended into postmodern verse as well, as writers like Frank O’Hara ("Self-Portrait with Masks") and, most famously, John Ashbery ("Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror") ultimately turned the mirror on themselves. Tracing the tradition of poetic portraits back to 19th century verse, Frances Dickey argues in "The Modern Portrait Poem From Dante Gabriel Rossetti to Ezra Pound" that the genre "investigates a variety of possibilities about the self, whether viewing persons as discrete and thing-like or exploring the way that selves blend and intersect." <br /> <br />Building on Dickey's premise, this panel aims to explore the wide “variety of possibilities about the self€ that modern and postmodern self/portrait poems articulate or, indeed, 'graph.' How do these poems orient, disorient, or reorient idea of the self or subjectivity? What verbal and/or visual processes do they utilize? <br /> <br />Possible lines of inquiry include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />1. the self/portrait poem & race, gender, and sexuality <br /> <br />2. the self/portrait poem & theories of the lyric <br /> <br />3. the self/portrait poem & contemporary (post-1975) poetry <br /> <br />4. the self/portrait poem & the visual arts tradition <br /> <br />5. the self/portrait poem & serial forms <br /> <br />6. the self/portrait poem & historical/political events <br /> <br />7. the self/portrait poem & transnationalism <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract, short bio, and A/V needs to Alexandra Gold, agold25@bu.edu, by March 30th. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2018

For more information, contact: Alexandra Gold

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Global Modernisms and the Graphic


Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz's field-defining article, "The New Modernist Studies," turns ten in 2018. Despite the fact that the article takes up new media as a key topic, and although it was published just after ground-breaking work in the "visual turn" of literary studies by Mary Lou Emery (Modernism, the Visual, and Caribbean Literature, 2007), W.J.T. Mitchell (Picture Theory, 2005), Michael North (Camera Works, 2005), and Mark Wollaeger (Modernism, Media, and Propaganda, 2006), theories and discussions of global modernism have since focused considerably more energy on modernism's geographic and temporal dimensions than its relation to the graphic. Yet film, pictures, images, and other graphic modes frequently appear in the criticism of global modernism as well as at the scenes of literary modernist production. <br /> <br />Our panel invites papers that explore how the graphic might refine or critique global modernist studies. We are especially interested in papers that address this issue with regard to empire, gender, race, global capitalism, and/or the anthropocene. <br /> <br />Send a 300-word abstract and one-paragraph bio to Patrick Herald (patrick.steven.herald@emory.edu) and George Micajah Phillips (gphillips@franklincollege.edu) by March 30, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2018

For more information, contact: George Micajah Phillips

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Lexigraphic Modernisms


Lexigraphic Modernisms <br /> <br />What role does the lexigraphic (lexi-: word, speaking, speech + -graph: to write, scratch, scrape, or graze) have in modernist studies? How does a single concept, problematic, or controlling image scratch or scrape accepted approaches to modernism or particular figures? How might single-term studies address misreadings, misconceptions, blindnesses, or "wrong turns" in approaches to modernism, or conversely, how might these controlling terms limit our approaches? What and/or who composes the keywords of modernism? Panelists may consider single terms as a general approach to modernism in light of Melba Cuddy-Keane, Adam Hammond, and Alexandra Peat's Modernism: Keywords (2014), or specific terms themselves such as Justus Nieland's "publicity," Judith Brown's "glamour," Laura Frost's "pleasure," or commonly-accepted foundational terms of modernism such as shock, cosmopolitanism, newness, or difficulty. <br /> <br />Papers addressing underrepresented figures in modernism are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please submit a 300-word abstract and short bio to Kara Watts (kara_watts@my.uri.edu) by March 30, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, US
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2018

For more information, contact: Kara Watts

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Modernism and the Forms of Life Writing


This panel will pursue the remapping of modernism through its complex relations with life writing. While recent work has emphasized the many forms of generic blurring and fusion (e.g. Saunders’ “autobiografiction”), we seek to examine, as an informing and instructive contrast, instances of relatively direct engagement with the particular liabilities, and the particular leverage, of the explicitly (perhaps graphically) “personal” and the avowedly “true”--whether in the form of diaries, letters, autobiographies or memoirs, or biographies. We seek papers that focus on particular instances but address broader questions, such as: How do the subject’s gender and social position inform the purposes and alter the stakes of publishing these forms? What modes are deployed (e.g. confession, testimony, documentary) and to what ends? What might the creation, publication, or reception of these forms in the modernist era reveal about changing notions of subjectivity, privacy, readership--perhaps of historiography and of fiction? If “the very genres we choose to read define the contours of our narratives about modernism” (Seshagiri 2017) how might reading and teaching these forms of life writing reshape those narratives? <br /> <br />Please send 250-300 word proposals and a brief bio to e.ophir@usask.ca by March 30. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2018

For more information, contact: Ella Ophir

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Modernism and Graphic Justice


The modernist period, one of worldwide literary experiment and of worldwide conflict, demanded a rethinking not merely of psychological subjectivity, but of what it meant to be subject to the law and to punishment. This panel is particularly concerned with graphic, violent or uncomfortable modernist representations of (and, where appropriate, their experiences of) law, crime and punishment, and human/nonhuman rights. <br /> <br />The previous excellent work on modernism and crime or violence (such as Cole, 2012; Sheehan, 2013; Evers, 2013; Eburne, 2008) has tended towards a focus on metaphorical or aesthetic violence: this panel hopes to build on this work by exploring where literary and psychic violence comes into contact with judicial violence. <br /> <br />Examples of the kind of modernist life and work that this panel might consider could include: <br />* Harlem Renaissance anti-lynching activism <br />* Ezra Pound and the treason trial; <br />* Samuel Beckett and support for prisoners producing and performing his work; <br />* Elizabeth Bowen and involvement with the Royal Commission investigating capital punishment; <br />* Modernists as readers or writers of crime fiction; <br />* Influences of criminology on modernism; <br />* Modernist responses to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. <br /> <br />In short, we hope to use the space afforded by this panel to examine how the singularity of literature (Attridge) offered early twentieth-century readers opportunities for thinking through crime and punishment. <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary approaches, especially from fields such as psychoanalysis, philosophy, law or the visual arts, are particularly welcome; although all proposals will be carefully considered on their own merits. <br /> <br />Please send 250-300 word proposals to k.ebury@sheffield.ac.uk by 15th March.

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, US
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2018

For more information, contact: Katherine Ebury

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MSA 2018 Columbus: Vanguard U.


MSA 2018 Seminar <br />Vanguard U.: Universities as Infrastructures of the Avant-garde <br /> <br />The term “avant-garde” often conjures images of cultural radicals bucking tradition, agitating against the stifling confines of the academy and other institutions, and dismantling established traditions and values. Yet the constitution of any avant-garde is premised upon either the invention or (more often) the seizure and transformation of infrastructures of circulation – publications, exhibition spaces, teaching institutions, etc. – to disseminate ideas, artworks, and activities. <br /> <br />With the exception of avowedly experimental institutions like Black Mountain College, the New School for Social Research, and Cal Arts, North American universities are not typically imagined as sites of vanguard activity, and scholars rarely consider the ways avant-garde thought and practice rely upon, transform, and even nurture existing public institutions. This seminar aims to account for the presence, practices, and legacies of avant-garde writers and artists in universities -- particularly in large public research institutions that are geographically far removed from established coastal urban centers of cultural production. <br /> <br />We invite papers that focus on universities as incubators of avant-garde thought and practice, in the past, present, and future. How have public research universities, as both infrastructure and philosophical enterprise, advanced avant-garde ideas and practices in multiple, and at times coordinated, domains (for example, in collecting, teaching, and practice)? <br /> <br />We intend for this discussion to constitute a significant contribution to ongoing interdisciplinary efforts to constitute a critical vanguard studies for the twenty-first century.

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2018

For more information, contact: Jen Buckley

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Modernist Physical Cultures


Physical culture, from the Lincoln Republic-era US to Weimar Germany, was a set of social and bodily practices that imagined an ideal community as an extension of a sound physical body. The rise of avant-garde aesthetics (as Maaike Bleeker observes in relation to dance) €œparalleled the emergence of a more general interest in physical culture.€ While promising, according to Mark Whalan, €œthat building the body built the man, physical culture also, as Tim Armstrong has suggested €œoften elided the question of the relation between external and internal disciplines, which is to say that physical culture often amounted to an ideological cover for masculinist, capitalist and imperialist forms of domination. <br /> <br />Like other elements of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century society, physical culture became fodder for modernist and avant-garde cultural production, and the divisions and contradictions that it contained were also taken up in the cultural production of the period. This panel asks how modernist cultural products reinterpret and respond to physical culture. Toward what political and aesthetic ends do modernists represent physical culture? How do modernists use physical culture to imagine new forms of belonging or critique extant structures of community? Possible topics for submission include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />-Sport and mass culture <br />-Physical fitness <br />-Gymnastics <br />-Dance <br />-Outdoorsmanship <br />-Fascist physical culture in Germany and beyond <br />-Soviet and left physical cultures <br />-Postcolonial physical cultures <br /> <br />Please submit a 250-word abstract and short bio to Harrington Weihl (hweihl@u.northwestern.edu) by 22 March, 2018.

Conference Location: Columbus, Ohio, US
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 02, 2018

For more information, contact: Harrington Weihl

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Vanguard U: State Universities and the Avant-gardes


MSA18 CFP: <br /> <br />Vanguard U: State Universities and the Avant-gardes <br /> <br />Where do we locate the avant-garde, historically, geographically, and ideologically? Critics have offered competing answers to this question over the past eight decades. The avant-garde has been variously described as anti-art and as aesthetically generative; as modernist, anti-modernist, and anti-modern; as anti-institutional and as a bourgeois formation; as “historical,” “neo,” dead, or irrelevant; as inherently European or American, and as a fundamentally transnational phenomenon; as nihilist and as utopian; as progressive and as reactionary. <br /> <br />Wherever and whenever scholars have positioned the avant-garde, they have not, generally speaking, located it in universities. Avowedly experimental small schools like Black Mountain, the New School, and Cal Arts have long been recognized as avant-garde outposts on the margins of academia. This session, however, aims to account for the presence, practices, and legacies of avant-garde writers and artists in US universities, and particularly in large land-grant schools geographically far removed from the east- and west-coast urban centers. In particular, we seek to generate knowledge of the relationships between state-funded research institutions and artists (faculty, students, or visitors) engaging in experimental practices that push or cross disciplinary and/or national boundaries. We intend for this discussion to constitute a significant contribution to ongoing interdisciplinary efforts to redefine the avant-garde for the twenty-first century. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract with short bio to Jennifer Buckley (jennifer-buckley@uiowa.edu) and Joyce Tsai (joyce-tsai@uiowa.edu) by Feb 15, 2018. <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, USA
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2018

For more information, contact: Jennifer Buckley

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Faulkner &amp; Yoknapatawpha 2018:Faulkner and Slavery


During his apprenticeship and early years as a published writer, William Faulkner evinced little serious interest in the issue of slavery or in the lives of the enslaved: their experiences, words, deeds, interiority, personal relationships, or historical legacies. This is perhaps surprising, given the fact of slaveholding, and the likelihood of sexual liaisons between enslavers and the enslaved, in Faulkner’s family history. After 1930, however, the year he moved his family into an antebellum mansion built by a slaveholding Mississippi planter, Faulkner turned repeatedly to the subject of slavery over the next two decades or so of his writing career. The forty-fifth annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference will take up as its guiding concern the question, “What did slavery mean in the life, ancestry, environment, imagination, and career of William Faulkner?” Facets of this question worth exploring may include but are no means limited to: <br />--histories of slavery in/and the Falkner and/or Butler families of Mississippi <br />--Mississippi slavery and the history of the Robert Sheegog home in Oxford (later Rowan Oak) <br />--other histories of slavery in Oxford, Lafayette County, and north Mississippi, or at the University of Mississippi, as contexts for Faulkner’s writings or as depicted in his work <br />--the figure of the enslaved in Faulkner’s writings: man, woman, child, the elderly, field laborer, domestic laborer, sexual property, fugitive, “saltwater slave” (first-generation African); the intersectionality of slave identities; etc. <br />--the “world the slaves made” in Faulkner’s work: psychology, spirituality, expressivity and expression, affect, sexuality, kinship arrangements and family life, aesthetics and cultural practices, gender roles, childhood, economic activity, forms of resistance to enslavement <br />--Faulkner’s accounts of the master-slave relationship <br />--the figure of the enslaver in Faulkner: men, women, the elderly, children from the slaveholding class; small holders versus large ones; patterns of settlement or migration; etc. <br />--institutions of slavery: representations or historical legacies of the Atlantic slave trade, the Middle Passage, the slave market, the slave plantation, plaçage, the whip (or other institutions of slave discipline/punishment), etc. <br />--the political economy of slavery in Faulkner <br />--Faulkner’s fiction in/against the history of slavery as traced by Lawrence Levine, Eugene Genovese, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Orlando Patterson, David Brion Davis, Edmund Morgan, Walter Johnson, C. L. R. James, Eric Williams, Paul Gilroy, or other leading scholars of the subject <br />--comparative histories or geographies of slavery in Faulkner <br />--Faulkner’s relationship to slave narrative or other genres from the literary history of New World slavery <br />--comparative analyses of slavery/the enslaved in Faulkner and other writers or artists: southern, American, hemispheric, global, twentieth-century, “modernist,” etc. <br />--cultural legacies of slavery in Faulkner’s fictions of postslavery <br />--the racial politics of white-authored representations of African American enslavement <br /> <br />The program committee especially encourages full panel proposals for 75-minute conference sessions. Such proposals should include a one-page overview of the session topic or theme, followed by two-page abstracts for each of the panel papers to be included. We also welcome individually submitted 1-2-page abstracts for 15-20-minute panel papers. Panel papers consist of approximately 2,500 words and will be considered by the conference program committee for possible expansion and inclusion in the conference volume published by the University Press of Mississippi. <br /> <br />Session proposals and panel paper abstracts must be submitted by January 31, 2018, preferably through e-mail attachment. All manuscripts, proposals, abstracts, and inquiries should be addressed to Jay Watson, Department of English, The University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, University, MS 38677-1848. E-mail: jwatson@olemiss.edu. Decisions for all submissions will be made by March 15, 2018.

Conference Location: Oxford, Mississippi, USA
Conference Starts: July 22, 2018
Conference Ends: July 26, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: January 31, 2018

For more information, contact: Leigh Anne Duck

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