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Modernist Objects


<br />MODERNIST OBJECTS <br /> <br />Third International Conference of the French Society for Modernist Studies (SEM) <br /> <br />13-14-15-16th June 2018, Paris Sorbonne University (VALE EA 4085) <br /> <br />Keynote speakers: <br /> <br />Rachel Bowlby (University College London); Douglas Mao (Johns Hopkins University). <br /> <br /> <br />In a line which seems pre-emptively levelled at Aaron Jaffe’s The Way Things Go exactly one century later, Richard Aldington wrote in The Egoist that “one of the problems of modern art” is that “to drag smells of petrol, refrigerators, ocean greyhounds, President Wilson and analine [sic] dyes into a work of art will not compensate for lack of talent and technique.” This was December 1914. In the next few decades, psychoanalysis sought to make sense of the trivial, thinkers inquired into the status of the mass-produced object, and the rise of feminist and Labour movements posed the prosaic and essential question of material comforts. Modernist art and literature focused on the mundane, as emblematized by the everyday object, which now crystallized our changing relation to the world. The anachronistic frigidaire patent in Ezra Pound’s “Homage to Sextus Propertius,” ordinariness in William Carlos Williams’s famous “red wheelbarrow,” defamiliarization in Gertrude Stein’s “Roastbeef” are but a few possible variations on the object, its importance becoming central to the British neo-empiricists and the American Objectivists. Papers could examine the claim that the poetry and prose, the visual and performing arts, and the music of the Modernist era accounted for a shift in object relations with an intensity of observation in proportion with the changes which so profoundly affected the experience of living in industrial times. This SEM conference invites English-language contributions that cover the widest range of reflections on Modernist objects. <br /> <br />Topics may include, but are not restricted to: <br /> <br />- the object vs the thing <br /> <br />- instruments and tools, technology, the machine <br /> <br />- the object as mass-produced commodity; resistance to consumption <br /> <br />- waste, junk, obsolescence, recycling <br /> <br />- the material presence of the book or the magazine in everyday life <br /> <br />- architecture, machines for living <br /> <br />- the Utopian potential of the crafted object <br /> <br />- the gift and the unalienable object <br /> <br />- objects, social identities and intimacy <br /> <br />- the object and/in space <br /> <br />- the object in/of science <br /> <br />- non-human agency <br /> <br />- the object in the Anthropocene <br /> <br /> <br />Please send proposals (300 words) and short biographies to Hélène Aji, Université Paris Nanterre (helene.aji@parisnanterre.fr), Noëlle Cuny, Université de Haute Alsace (noelle.cuny@gmail.com) and Xavier Kalck, Université Paris Sorbonne (xkalck@gmail.com) no later than November 15th, 2017. Notification of decision: December 15th, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Paris, France
Conference Starts: June 13, 2018
Conference Ends: June 16, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: November 15, 2017

For more information, contact: Xavier Kalck

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Suffrage, Socialism, and Working Women


We seek a third paper for a proposed panel on “Suffrage, Socialism, and Working Women” at the “Women’s Suffrage and Political Activism” Centenary Conference, Murray Edwards College, Cambridge, England, February 3, 2018: http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/research/conferences/current-pdfs/womens-suffrage-cfp <br /> <br />The conference organizers’ observation that in practice the “working relationships between suffragists [and] socialists were often troubled” is our starting point for considering the relationship between socialism, suffrage, and working women's concerns in the years leading up to WWI. The panel will include a discussion of the well-publicized but under-studied 1907 debate between Teresa Billington Greig, who left the WSPU and co-founded the WFL and whose essays for the socialist New Age offer a case study for debates about women’s suffrage and socialist concerns, and Margaret Bondfield, a shop assistant-turned-union organizer who later became a prominent figure in the Labour Party. We are particularly interested in papers that address criticisms of the militant suffrage movement for sidelining working-class concerns, and papers that examine the relationship between women’s suffrage and the adult suffrage platform supported by socialist women. <br /> <br />Please send a 150-word abstract and brief bio to Lise Shapiro Sanders (lsanders@hampshire.edu) and Carey Snyder (snyderc3@ohio.edu) by October 25, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Cambridge, England
Conference Starts: February 03, 2018
Conference Ends: February 03, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: October 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Lise Sanders

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&quot;Modernism in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands&quot;


"Modernism in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands" <br /> <br />We are looking for outstanding essays addressing the topic of "Modernism in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands" for a special issue of Modernist Cultures, tentatively scheduled to appear in 2019. While the “global turn” in modernist studies has greatly expanded scholarly conceptions of the geographies and temporalities that can be interestingly considered modernist, this special issue aims to address the comparatively neglected subject of configurations of modernity and modernism in the Pacific. To study modernism in the Pacific is to grapple with issues of settler colonialism, gender, indigeneity, nationalism and transnationalism, sexuality, formations of capital, and racialization that complicate received narratives about the nature and course of modernism and modernization in other parts of the world. We believe that the importance of this project goes well beyond the goal of bringing another geographic region into the modernist fold, overdue as that may be. If modernist studies really wants to investigate modernism as a multi-sited and rhizomatic phenomenon, then we are persuaded that it is essential to consider the intersections and ruptures between the ways cultural producers across the Pacific experienced and expressed modernity, responded to and influenced visual art, music, dance, and literature elsewhere in the world, and advanced or inflected processes of modernization. <br /> <br />We welcome essays on all forms of cultural production and on writing in any of the colonial or indigenous languages of the Pacific; essays themselves should be in English. Please send a 300-word abstract and prospective title for your essay, with a short biographical note, to Brian Reed (bmreed@u.washington.edu) or Erin Carlston (e.carlston@auckland.ac.nz) by 1 October 2017.

Conference Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Conference Starts: October 01, 2017
Conference Ends: October 01, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: October 01, 2017

For more information, contact: Erin G. Carlston

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ACLA 2018 Seminar Before the War: Love and Nation in 1920s and 1930s Europe


Dear Colleagues, <br /> <br />Below is a call for papers which some of you may find of interest. Please, feel free to pass this information along to colleagues, associates, or students whose research relates to this topic. <br /> <br />Thank you and best regards, <br />Dorota Heneghan <br /> <br />ACLA Seminar/ CALL FOR PAPERS: “Before the War: Love and Nation in 1920s and 1930s Europe” <br /> <br />Seeking presentations related to national projects, war, communism, fascism, mass culture, and gender issues in Spain and the rest of Europe in the 1920s and 1930s. <br /> <br />https://www.acla.org/seminar/war-love-and-nation-1920s-and-1930s-europe <br /> <br /> <br />Organizer: Dorota Heneghan (dheneg1@lsu.edu) <br /> <br />American Comparative Literature Association / Annual Meeting 2018 March 29th-April 1st, 2018 UCLA, Los Angeles, California <br /> <br />Please, send a 250-word abstract directly to ACLA (https://www.acla.org) by Thursday September 21st, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Los Angeles , California
Conference Starts: March 28, 2018
Conference Ends: April 01, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: September 21, 2017

For more information, contact: Dorota Heneghan

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Rock and Modernism (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


At this point, I would like to especially encourage papers on women in rock as it relates to modernism (preferably by women scholars). I am particularly looking for papers on women artists, such as Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, Patti Smith, Grace Jones, Riot grrrls, etc...Thank you. <br /> <br />In his 1961 article "On the Teaching of Modern Literature," Lionel Trilling questioned the "educational propriety of [moderism's] being studied in college," since he thought it to be "the disenchantment of our culture with culture itself." Teaching modernism became part of "the process we might call the socialization of the anti-social, or the acculturation of the anti-cultural, or the legitimization of the subversive." While rock and roll had been around for six years, the earlier rock and roll stars--Little Richard, Elvis, Chuck Berry--lacked the cultural and aesthetic significance that the rock musicians emerging within the next few years following Trilling's article would. Both rock music and modernism shocked their contemporaries by attacking the values, conventions, and status of the "official culture." And both of these adversarial formations achieved moments of cultural significance before being legitimized by the official culture through the formation of canons, inclusion in museums, and academic study. Of course, great differences exist between rock and modernism--differences in history, nation, media, politics, audience, critics, to name a few. <br /> <br />This panel seeks papers that explore harmony or points of discord between modernism and rock music. Some possible paper topics might include: <br /> <br />*Influence of modernism on rock music/modernists as rock precursors <br />*Relation of modernity to rock and modernism <br />*Exploitation/exploration of technology and new media <br />*Drugs or altered states of consciousness <br />*Beats and/or jazz as intermediaries between rock and modernism <br />*Celebrity, marketing, and consumerism in rock and modernism <br />*Significance of film to rock and modernism <br />*Avant-garde vs. modernist aesthetics in rock <br />*Role of educational institutions <br />*Academic studies <br />*Legitimization: canons, museums, universities <br />*Race, gender, sexuality, class <br />*Audiences <br /> <br />Please send a brief bio and 250-word proposal to Rob Hurd (rrhurd@aacc.edu) ASAP.

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: July 28, 2017

For more information, contact: Rob Hurd

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Hugh Macdiarmid and Scottish Modernism, 1900-1930


Walt Whitman's 1855 preface to Leaves of Grass begins with the claim that 'The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed it.'€ Whitman was attempting to articulate his belief in a uniquely American verse in a way which directly chimes with the ambitions of Hugh MacDiarmid, whose own efforts to revive (and in some senses create) a vibrant literary community in Scotland relied to a large extent on his individual conceptions of nationhood and its inextricable links to literary achievement. <br /> <br />MacDiarmid's own absorption of Scotland could only loosely be described as affectionate. Never falling shy of controversy, MacDiarmid's career from start to finish is typified by a desire to rock the boats of convention. This conference, which belatedly marks the 90th anniversary of 'A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle', seeks in turn to revivify the field of MacDiarmid scholarship. We welcome papers which focus on any and all aspect of his career which spanned multiple genres and forms of writing. We are especially eager to hear papers which seek to situate MacDiarmid in unusual contexts, or explore his influence which, if nothing else, is ripe for contestation in today's Scotland, with the independence referendum of 2014 still fresh in the memory. First and foremost, we would like to spark up the conversation about the man and his historical context which we feel is (at the present moment) much too quiet for a writer of his stature. Furthermore, we encourage submissions which take other Scottish writers of this period as their subject; was there an identifiably€ Scottish modernism? And, if so, how did it manifest itself? <br /> <br />This conference will take place at Edinburgh University on August 11th 2017. Please send proposals for 20-minute papers for consideration to: scottishmodernism2017@gmail.com by Friday the 9th of June. <br />

Conference Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Conference Starts: August 11, 2017
Conference Ends: August 11, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: June 09, 2017

For more information, contact: Benedict Jones-Williams

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Teaching Hemingway in the Digital Age


Call for Papers: Teaching Hemingway in the Digital Age <br />Collection Editors: Laura Godfrey (lggodfrey@nic.edu) and Mark Ott (teachinghemingway@gmail.com) <br /> <br />Teaching Hemingway in the Digital Age combines two broad aims: to make available to high school and college teachers a wide selection of the best techniques and contemporary digital tools for teaching Hemingway to 21st century “digital age” students, and to showcase how digital humanists use Hemingway’s writing for their own scholarship and teaching. The subtle textures of Hemingway’s prose can provide valuable training for contemporary students who need above all to learn to read slowly and with close attention to a literary text. (In fact, the novelist Andre Dubus III touched on these benefits in his 2012 PEN Hemingway keynote address, remarking that “In this digital present where so many human faces are lit with the glow of one screen after another, a time when the notion of individuality and the truly real is beginning to blur, more than ever before we need the life’s work of Ernest Hemingway.”) How do we illuminate the dense complexities of Hemingway’s seemingly-simple prose to readers used to skimming websites? How can we highlight his characters’ attachments to physical environments when students are more attuned to virtual ones? Alternatively, contributors might consider whether “digital age” students are by virtue of their environment and experiences somehow more connected to Hemingway’s life and his writing. <br /> <br />But Teaching Hemingway in the Digital Age is not intended simply to indict contemporary students and their smartphones. More important, we expect contributors will describe pedagogical opportunities for teaching Hemingway that are made possible with digital applications or digital humanities, opportunities that illuminate unique qualities of his work and life. We hope that the contributors to this collection will document not only the divisions but the remarkable, unexplored parallels between Hemingway’s works and the contemporary digital era, offering ways to bring those comparisons to life in the classroom. <br /> <br />While the final organization of the collection will depend upon the accepted essays, we anticipate three general thematic sections: <br /> <br />I. The Digital Divide€ <br />Those of us responsible for teaching the works of Ernest Hemingway to 21st century students often find ourselves trying to bridge an ever-growing digital divide.€ Simply put, students accustomed to seeing virtual landscapes on a screen often find it difficult to picture literary ones. Yet an appreciation of Hemingway's work depends in large part on understanding the physical world he recreates. In his 1935 Esquire piece, "Monologue to the Maestro," Hemingway stated that aspiring writers must "be able to go into a room and when you come out know everything that you saw there and not only that. If that room gave you any feeling you should know exactly what it was that gave you that feeling."€ The generative power of things is an important principle in Hemingway's entire body of work. Can students who have not been trained to pay attention to actual places--and things-in-their-places--understand the intensity and fidelity of Hemingway's literary environments? Or does training one's eye toward virtual landscapes, paradoxically, somehow give students better (but different) skills for reading Hemingway's real ones? <br /> <br />A second topic in this section might concern individuality, community, and solitude. Students born in the 1990s or 2000s have grown up in a social-media-driven environment, one in which individuality is often expressed and defined in ways that are decidedly oppositional to some of the best-known Hemingway code€ heroes, reticent yet contemplative figures who so often go it alone. The 21st century emphasis on "connectivity"€ sits at odds with solitude, stands in opposition to introspection. Instead, the digital-age focus is often on constant connection and collective, ubiquitous sharing: minute-by-minute updates of our thoughts and all our daily "data." (Students€' attitudes towards solitude have altered so much, as William Deresiewicz has written in an often-quoted 2009 essay in the Chronicle of Higher Education, that we are, in fact, witnessing "the end of solitude.") But solitude, introspection, and individuality are some of the core traits of Hemingway's characters. How do we teach texts such as "Big Two-Hearted River,"€ a narrative of an entirely solitary fishing trip, to students who may rarely or never be alone? In what sense can the social media-immersed student possess some new or illuminated understanding of the relationships between Hemingway's individual characters and their communities? <br /> <br />II. Digital Resources for Teaching Hemingway <br />Digital humanities scholars are currently developing platforms to teach Hemingway's writing to students on their terms, and students themselves (undergraduate and graduate students alike) are participating in the invention of digital Hemingway technologies. We are interested, in this section, to publish essays concerning the use of such resources. What do spatially insular stories like "The End of Something" look like when we create digital maps for them? How can a digital cartographic technology like a GIS (Geographic Information Systems) map show how much wider Hemingway's spatial sense of the world became in The Sun Also Rises? Other examples of recently-developed Hemingway digital technologies include student-created Google Lit Trips interactive maps; the "Hemingway App,"€ a downloadable text-editor application that can edit a writer's style based on a Hemingway-esque algorithm designed to produce prose of "clarity and simplicity"€; or the JFK Library's recent digitization of Hemingway's childhood scrapbooks (a watershed moment in Hemingway studies, because students and scholars no longer have to travel to Boston to see the documents). In short, there is much of Hemingway's life and work that can be made more accessible and meaningful with these new digital tools, and we are interested in contributors' commentary on both the creation and/or use of these resources. <br /> <br />III. Virtual Hemingways <br />In this thematic section of the book, we invite contributors to consider the ways that 21st century Hemingway internet resources provide rich opportunities for seeing Hemingway in new lights and from multiple angles. We seek contributors who can speak about specific digital resources that have been created around Hemingway's life and work and who think broadly about what kind of Hemingway those resources manufacture. When we enter Hemingway's name into any basic search engine like Google, hundreds of separate and fragmented "identities" emerge of him as a writer and a man. How do students make sense of the Hemingways they encounter on Wikipedia or as depicted by Tumblr bloggers? Which picture of Hemingway is more credible? Which of these and countless other virtual spaces are likely to be used most enthusiastically by our digital-age students, for better or for worse? <br /> <br />Deadlines and Contacts: We are looking for essays of approximately 2500-4000 words that consider topics related to the broad theme of teaching Hemingway in the digital age as well as essays that address the teaching of specific texts. The editors welcome essays from emerging scholars, and the published collection will reflect a wide range of critical approaches. Proposals of no more than 750 words should be sent to both Laura Godfrey (lggodfrey@nic.edu) and Teaching Hemingway series-editor Mark Ott (teachhemingway@gmail.com) by June 1st, 2017 to ensure fullest consideration for inclusion in the volume. Authors whose work is accepted should plan to submit completed manuscripts by September 1st, 2017. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Coeur d Alene, United States
Conference Starts: June 01, 2017
Conference Ends: June 01, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2017

For more information, contact: Laura Godfrey

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&quot;Artist-Audience Collaboration&quot; Panel at MLA 18


Works of literature, visual art, drama, dance, and music have long been addressed to readers, viewers, and listeners, both real and imagined. Whether implicit or explicit, the ways artists address, court, and affect their audiences are crucial to understanding their work. But while traditional ideas about audience often denote passive reception or disinterested judgment, certain artistic forms recast the observer as an active participant and/or collaborator in the construction of the art object’s meaning. This proposed panel for MLA 2018 will attend to such artist-audience exchanges with focus on the ways in which modern and postmodern art enjoins our attention to the contours of the artist-audience relationship through the encouragement of interactive responses. <br /> <br />We therefore seek papers that take diverse approaches to the questions: how do modern and contemporary artworks—including poems, paintings, works of fiction, performances, and other objects—solicit audience collaboration and/or participation? What do these types of interaction reveal about the historical development of aesthetics (literary or otherwise) in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? <br /> <br />Potential topics may include: <br />- the boundaries between witnessing and participation in interartistic collaborations; <br />- parody, erasure, or revision as types of audience response; <br />- site-specific and/or immersive performance adaptations of literary works; <br />- ekphrastic poetry as a form of collaboration between poem/poet and visual artist/object; <br />- open forms and the public (or counterpublic) sphere; <br />- reader-response, reception, and semiotic methods of literary analysis; <br />- the artist as audience in documentary realism and reportage; <br />- the role of institutions (e.g. museums, libraries, and archives) in artist-audience interactions; <br />- the politics of collaboration and/or participation; <br />- audience interaction in new media. <br /> <br />Please submit 250-word abstracts, CV, and A/V needs by March 15, 2017 to Alexandra Gold (agold25@bu.edu) and Frank Capogna (f.capogna@northeastern.edu).

Conference Location: New York, United States
Conference Starts: January 04, 2018
Conference Ends: January 07, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2017

For more information, contact: Frank Capogna

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D.H. Lawrence &amp; Charisma


This CFP is for the D.H. Lawrence Society's session at MLA 2018. <br /> <br />The topic is "Dangerous Charisma" <br /> <br />The age of Trump has brought the issue of charisma in leadership to the fore. How does Lawrence help us understand the mutual attraction of leader and acolyte? Lawrence wrote about charisma in personal and political relationships, and his contemporaries found him charismatic. <br /> <br />Papers might consider how Lawrence represents charisma, how his ideas of leadership change, or how others responded to him. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts to Joyce Wexler at jwexler@luc.edu by March 15. <br />

Conference Location: New York City, USA
Conference Starts: January 04, 2018
Conference Ends: January 07, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2017

For more information, contact: Joyce Wexler

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CFP: Elizabeth von Arnim and Katherine Mansfield – Literary Connections, Friendships and Influence


CFP: Elizabeth von Arnim and Katherine Mansfield – Literary Connections, Friendships and Influence <br />Posted on October 8, 2016 by admin <br />Conference: 19 & 20 July 2017 at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California <br /> <br />Elizabeth von Arnim and Katherine Mansfield – Literary Connections, Friendships and Influence <br /> <br />Keynote Speakers:Professor Emerita Bonnie Kime Scott <br />(San Diego State University) <br /> <br />Professor Christine Froula <br />(Northwestern University) <br /> <br />This conference is the first joint venture of the Katherine Mansfield Society and the International Elizabeth von Arnim Society <br /> <br />“There is a kind of turn in our sentences which is alike but that is because we are worms of the same family.” (Katherine Mansfield) <br /> <br />Recent scholarship on the complicated friendship between Katherine Mansfield and her bestselling author cousin, Elizabeth von Arnim, has done much to shed light on the complex literary and personal connections between these unlikely friends. In spite of their difference in age and outlook on life, von Arnim and Mansfield shared more than just antipodean family connections. Mansfield’s narrator in her early collection of short stories, In a German Pension, bears marked resemblances with the protagonist of Elizabeth and Her German Garden, and von Arnim’s most radical novel, Vera, was written at the height of her intimate friendship with Mansfield. John Middleton Murry dedicated his posthumous collection of Mansfield’s poems to ‘Elizabeth of the German Garden’. <br /> <br />Moreover, both writers had close ties to London’s literary scene and shared friends and mutual acquaintances, including Bertrand Russell, Virginia Woolf, S. S. Koteliansky and Ottoline Morrell. Both also remained ambivalent about that most powerful of literary circles, Bloomsbury. This overlap of friends, connections and literary influences is typical of the fluid and dynamic literary landscape of the interwar years and raises the question: How did friendships and literary connections shape the work of both writers? <br /> <br />This conference seeks to explore the literary connections, friendships and influences that shaped Mansfield and von Arnim’s work. Building on recent scholarship, we are seeking papers that situate Mansfield and von Arnim within the literary field, their friendship networks and within their own extensive family. <br /> <br />As well as holding the Elizabeth von Arnim (Countess Russell) papers, the Huntington is a destination venue in its own right. The library is located in glorious botanical gardens and the library houses a world class art collection. <br /> <br />Papers may include but are not limited to the following topics: <br /> <br />Mansfield and/or von Arnim’s personal and artistic relationship with other writers e.g., in addition to those listed above, this might include E.M. Forster, H.G. Wells, George Santanaya, John Middleton Murry, Frank Swinnerton, George Moore, Hugh Walpole, D. H. Lawrence, Aldous Huxley and others <br />Biographical explorations <br />Connections between middle- and highbrow writing, connection to literary ‘schools’ <br />Thematic connections between the two authors might include: <br />Place <br />Gardens <br />Music <br />The natural world <br />Gender <br />Queer narratives <br />Trans-national connections <br />Psychology <br />Food <br />Domestic relationships <br />Childhood <br />Satire and Irony <br />Please send abstracts of c.200 words, together with a 50 word biosketch, by 28 February 2017 to: <br /> <br />Dr Juliane Roemhild j.roemhild@latrobe.edu.au <br /> <br />and <br /> <br />Dr Gerri Kimber kms@katherinemansfieldsociety.org <br />

Conference Location: Huntington Library, San Marino, California, United States
Conference Starts: July 19, 2017
Conference Ends: July 20, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: February 28, 2017

For more information, contact: Dr Noreen O'Connor

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First World War Today


<br /> <br />“First World War Today” Panel <br /> <br />As we experience social unrest accompanying the First World War’s centennial, what is the war’s legacy today? “Oh What a Literary War,” Paul Fussell opined in the classic The Great War and Modern Memory, but contemporary studies of the First World War have expanded beyond literature to include media, theory, and material culture. This panel invites papers considering the First World War’s participation in contemporary literary and cultural discourse. How has the war been portrayed in an evolving range of genres, especially graphic narratives, film, gothic, time travel, LGBTQ texts, etc.? What rituals of World War I memorialization and forgetting have survived or been newly created? How are previously neglected or underrepresented groups (such as nurses, First Peoples, or colonial nations) gaining recognition in studies of the First World War, and what does this signify? What choices have museums made in their curations of the First World War, and why? How is the material culture of the First World War (trench art, propaganda posters, etc.) becoming increasingly prominent in our understanding of the war? How has the First World War figured in recent post-colonial theory or debates concerning the modernist bildungsroman? How do different cultures reflect on the continuing geo-political effects of the 1916 Sykes-Picot Agreement and partition of Ottoman Empire after 1923? <br />Please send a brief biography and 250 word proposal to Jane Fisher (fisher@canisius.edu) by Feb. 3. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: February 03, 2017

For more information, contact: Jane Fisher

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27th International Virginia Woolf Conference


<br />The 27th Annual International Virginia Woolf Conference whose theme this year is ‘Virginia Woolf and the World of Books’ invites you to consider the past, present and future of Virginia Woolf’s works. Attendees are invited to submit papers relating to all aspects of the Woolfs, the world of books, and print cultures, including topics related to Leonard and Virginia Woolf and the Hogarth Press; the production, reception and distribution of Woolf’s works; editing, revision and translation; periodicals and book publishing; Woolf and her readers; global and planetary modernisms; Bloomsbury and its networks; Hogarth Press authors and illustrators; modernist publishing houses and publishers; Woolf and the Digital Humanities. <br /> <br />Submissions for 20 min papers and/or 3-speaker panel proposals are due February 1st 2017 to vwoolf2017@gmail.com. <br /> <br />Panel proposals should include all 3 abstracts with individual speakers’ details and bios on separate cover page. <br /> <br />Individual abstracts should be between 200-250 words. Please include a cover note with brief biography, affiliation, and contact details including email. <br /> <br />The 27th annual conference on Virginia Woolf @Reading, 29 June - 2 July 2017 <br />www.woolf2017.com <br />

Conference Location: Reading, UK
Conference Starts: June 29, 2017
Conference Ends: July 02, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: February 01, 2017

For more information, contact: Alice Staveley

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Special issue of JJQ: Encyclopedic Joyce


Ulysses and Finnegans Wake are encyclopedic novels—whatever that means. Joyce thought of Ulysses as "a kind of encyclopaedia" (SL 271), and he drew heavily on the eleventh edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica in writing it and the Wake. Both novels have the heft and polymathic breadth of a compact reference encyclopedia. One or the other of them is at the heart of every substantial treatment of encyclopedic literature that extends to modernism, from Northrop Frye's to Edward Mendelson's to Paul Saint-Amour's. Whatever the encyclopedic novel is, surely they're it. Yet just about everyone who writes about Joyce’s encyclopedism has something different in mind, and a spate of new work on the encyclopedia by historians and literary scholars working in earlier periods has suggested numerous other, unexplored avenues for thinking through his relationship to the encyclopedic tradition. <br /> <br />When we talk about the encyclopedia, we refer to some or all of the many meanings, connotations, histories, forms, practices, epistemologies, and bodies of knowledge that have attached to the term since antiquity. JJQ welcomes submissions that draw on the critical resources the term consolidates for a special issue, "Encyclopedia Joyce." We are open to any approach to the theme but are especially eager to read essays that make use of recent scholarship on the encyclopedia; that consider how gender and race might determine what counts as an encyclopedic text and who gets to write one; that read Joyce alongside authors not usually discussed in studies of encyclopedic literature (e.g. Dorothy Richardson, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer); that think about Joyce's encyclopedism in relation to the book's transition from bound pages to networked screens; that have something new to show about Joyce's use of reference works; that reflect on the usefulness or limitations of the encyclopedia in comparison with related critical categories (e.g. modern epic, the long modernist novel, the maximalist novel); or that examine Joyce's role as model or subject for contemporary encyclopedic projects. <br /> <br />Submissions are due January 31, 2017. They should not be longer than twenty pages, including notes. Send them electronically to James Phelan (james.phelan@vanderbilt.edu) and Kiron Ward (k.ward@sussex.ac.uk).

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: September 23, 2016
Conference Ends: January 31, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 31, 2017

For more information, contact: James Phelan

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Transnational Modernist Epiphanies (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


Transnational Modernist Epiphanies <br /> <br />The epiphany has long been considered one of modernist literature’s defining characteristics, a sudden, radiant manifestation, as Joyce put it, of “the truth of the being of the visible world.” In the fiction of those like Joyce, Mansfield, Woolf, Proust, and Conrad, these sudden perceptions or (apparent) moments of insight generally emerge from the midst of the everyday and create the sense, or illusion, that something decisive and transformative has occurred. While, in recent decades, the term has been treated with critical suspicion—and its use, by modernist writers, was often ambivalent and ironic—it nevertheless seems fair to say that the epiphany, in various guises, is integral to some of the most distinctive moments in Anglo-European modernism. <br /> <br />In light of modernist studies’ transnational or planetary turn, this panel proposes to track the circulation, translation, and indigenization—or independent, local emergences—of the epiphany in modernist and postcolonial works of the Global South and other “peripheral” national and linguistic traditions. In particular, we are interested in ways that the epiphany might offer a generative nodal point or “literary arc” for mapping the cross-cultural flows of global modernism, while more productively exploring the intersections of modernist studies and postcolonial studies. <br /> <br />Questions that might be addressed include: In what ways has the Euro-American modernist epiphany been reinvented, ironized, and/or undermined? What is the danger and/or value of treating the epiphany as an intrinsically modernist technique? How do specific uses of epiphany constitute a critical dialogue with canonical works of Western modernism? How have writers used the epiphany to critically recast the everyday of colonial modernity and imagine and articulate a postcolonial vision? How has the epiphany, often associated with notions of aesthetic autonomy, been turned to political ends? How have translators dealt with rendering the modernist epiphany in their target language? What critical relevance and/or aesthetic force does the epiphany (still) have? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 150-200 words and a brief bio to kswalsh@yonsei.ac.kr by January 28, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 28, 2017

For more information, contact: Kelly S. Walsh

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Anthropocene Modernism: Literature in a Time of Climate Change (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


This panel considers the ways in which literary modernism confronts the ecological challenges of the Anthropocene, the current geological period during which human activity has become a prevailing influence on climate and the environment. In light of our growing awareness of the precarity of numerous species, including our own, it proposes that modernist studies should expand its global reach to embrace larger temporalities and wider geographies, pursuing an engaged praxis that connects disparate elements of modernity -- literary representation, technological progress, the environment, and ethics. In this formulation, the Anthropocene represents not only an ecological transformation, but also a cultural one; the new modernist studies, attuned to the complex networks of ideas circulating within cultural texts, can play a vital role in tracing the historical, scientific, political, ethical, and imaginative discourses present in modernism's encounter with anthropogenic climate change. <br /> <br />Possible questions to be addressed include: <br /> <br />- How do modernist texts engage with climate change? <br /> <br />- How might a sense of geological time make new available new literary and historical periodizations? <br /> <br />- How does modernist studies engage productively with an interdisciplinary conversation whose roots lie in the natural and social sciences? <br /> <br />Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a brief bio to Andrew Logemann at alogemann@gmail.com by January 27, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 27, 2017

For more information, contact: Andrew Logemann

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The Modernist Pause (MSA 19)


The richness and complexity of modernist temporalities are well documented, and recent scholarship increasingly points to the interdependencies of time and space. Yet despite the fact that temporal fragmentation and rupture pervade modernist texts, little attention has been paid to the intervals and pauses in which time seemingly stops. This panel will examine the modernist pause to consider how such temporal interruptions generate new forms and critical encounters. What does the interval of the modernist pause, caesura, or break generate? What does it disrupt or resist? Among other topics, proposals might consider the modernist pause in relation to narratives of progress, nationalism and/or globalization; textual omission and/or censorship; memory and mourning; sexuality and/or queer temporalities; technology and new media studies; or new materialisms. <br /> <br />Please send a 250 word abstract and brief bio to reckerl@miamioh.edu by January 27th. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, NE
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 27, 2017

For more information, contact: L Recker

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The Wondrous Lives of Modernist Serialities (MSA 19)


Time is a constitutive feature of modernism. One way in which formal experimentation with time manifests itself, this panel argues, is in the practice of serial publication. The serial form, present across media and genres, is more than a mere publishing feature, especially in the early twentieth century, when it was actively used to experiment with time on a formal level, and to reflect on temporality and duration. Furthermore, seriality entails a set of questions that go to the heart of what we understand under modernism today: What is newness? How does the fragment relate to the whole? What does it mean to have uniqueness within repetition? If serials, as Hughes and Lund have argued, became “entwined with the readers’ own sense of lived experience and passing time,” then how does serialization speak to the historical realities of war, modernity, the maturing of capitalism as well as the contemporary realities of digitization and mediatization? In addressing these questions, the panel also looks at the gaps within the serial (which are constituent of its form), and examines key instances where repetition fails or breaks down (lateness or delay, broken seriality or interruption). Most importantly, it asks how modernist experiments with seriality continue to reverberate in contemporary culture, for instance through camp, as recently suggested by Bryant and Dao. <br /> <br />Taking its cue from the work of Mussell, Hughes and Lund, among others, this panel invites contributions on the diverse relationships between modernism and the serial form across different media (periodicals, comics, radio, television); on seriality within genres (serialization of novels, book series, poetry sequences); on repetition; on the fragment and the whole; on inconsistencies, broken chronologies and abandoned experiments in serialization; and, broadly, on the workings, continuation and implications of non-linear modernist temporalities. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words and a brief bio to Cedric.VanDijck@ugent.be by Friday, January 27, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 27, 2017

For more information, contact: Cedric Van Dijck

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CFP: H.D. at the American Literature Association


The H.D. International Society will again be sponsoring a panel at the American Literature Association conference, May 25-28, 2017, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, MA. The call for paper proposals is open ended, although projects working with some aspect of H.D.’s later writing would be particularly welcome given the recent publications of H.D. editions and their scholarly framings. Please send a brief paper proposal (250 words) along with a short biography/CV to Celena Kusch, ckusch@uscupstate.edu, no later than January 26, 2017. <br /> <br />For further information, please consult the ALA annual conference website at http://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-annual-conference/

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: May 25, 2017
Conference Ends: May 28, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 26, 2017

For more information, contact: Celena Kusch

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Teaching Modernism in the Age of Brexit and Trump


As Peter Gay explains in Modernism: The Lure of Heresy, “Fascists came into power legally . . . They freely resorted to naked physical assaults on politically inconvenient opponents; they labored to erase all traces of modern feminism and trade unionism; they put the making of a new, higher type of humanity on their program; they made increasingly exigent demands on ordinary citizens, invading their privacy whether it involved sports or music lessons, theatrical performances or art exhibitions” (Gay 433). Indeed, modernity’s increasingly cosmopolitan societies, which cultivated new ways of understanding the human condition, concurrently produced fascist governments elected in part by a fear of change—whether that change was located in immigration, women’s roles, sexuality, etc.--and a growing nostalgia and nationalism in response to this change. In short, the elements of fascism are a backlash against the more liberal tenets of modernity. <br /> <br />While comparisons between historical fascism and contemporary political issues are ideologically fraught affairs, often argued too hastily and unreflectively, the tensions in contemporary society regarding progress and nostalgia, truth and propaganda provide a rich opportunity for using modernist texts in the classroom. Additionally, recent controversies regarding efforts by elite art and artists to critique the results of democratic elections in Britain and the United States, and the sporadic attempts to censor these critiques, remind modernist scholars of the prior tensions between “mass cultural consumers [who] were seen to demonstrate passive consumptive habits” and “defenders of high culture,” who equated their aesthetic attitudes with “ethical culture, as they saw it” (Pease 168). <br /> <br />The following roundtable, then, invites modernist scholars to analyze pedagogical intersections between themes of modernist texts and the tensions produced by modernity. How does the present political and rhetorical climate in the United States and Great Britain provide teachers and scholars with fresh opportunities to utilize modernist texts? How might the historical and aesthetic distance provided by modernist texts foster classroom dialogue regarding the issues above rather than enabling its own type of implicit academic censorship? Papers which examine intersections between fascism and immigration, technology, sexuality, disability and censorship are particularly welcome. Please email abstracts, along with short bio, to Anthony Dotterman (Dotterman@Adelphi.edu) by <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 26, 2017

For more information, contact: anthony dotterman

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&quot;Objectivist&quot; Versions and Variations (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


The literary historical narrative of the "Objectivist" writers can itself be said to have several versions and variations. As Louis Zukofsky explains in An "Objectivists" Anthology (1932), "The interest in the [1931 Poetry magazine] issue was in the few recent lines of poetry which could be found, and in the craft of poetry, NOT in a movement. The contributors did not get up one morning all over the land and say 'objectivists' between tooth-brushes." The group was one of affiliation, with manifold connections between "members" who spanned countries and modernist moments; one could say that "Objectivism" is itself a term that suggests an aesthetic of versions and variations. <br /> <br />This aesthetic--of proliferating alternatives and polyvocal scope--characterizing the loose group as a whole can also be seen in individual texts, such as Lorine Niedecker’s New Goose poems, Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony, and many others. Zukofsky’s distinction between "craft" and "movement" emphasizes the practice of writing poetry, and will anchor this panel's exploration of versions and variations. From prioritizations of form to considerations of musicality, the "Objectivists" engage with the idea of versions and variations as both components of poetic practice and thematic material. How does the era's investment in seriality draw other poets into the "Objectivist" sphere? How might forms using the idea of variation be seen as "Objectivist?" Proposals might touch upon "Objectivist": play, musical and non-; drafts and archival materials; publication histories; sustained and serial works; relationships and collaborations; rewritings. <br /> <br />Please send a proposal of no more than 250 words and a brief biography to sanderson@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn by January 12, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Stephanie Anderson

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Fascist Rebirth, Modernist Resistance (CFP for MSA 19)


Today we witness a resurgence of fascist rhetoric from parties offering various "€œalternatives"€ to the multicultural states that have come to characterize Europe and North America. Modernism, of course, is famously entangled with the rise of fascism, these xenophobic movements' most notorious antecedent, and there is a new urgency to the questions that Griffin (2007), Antliff (2007), and Ben Ghiat (2015) have broached in their scholarly work. As Griffin suggests, fascism cannot only be understood as a reaction against modernism, but as a "political variant"€ of modernism—€”an insight that resonates with the current manifestation of variants or alternatives, some of which even include the term "alternative" in their monikers, such as the "Alt-Right" or "€œAlternative for Germany."€ <br /> <br />This panel looks to the earlier moment of fascism'€™s rise within the context of Modernism to try to better understand the contemporary appeal of fascist rhetoric as well as the possibilities for resistance to it. It centers around the question: how does fascism make its promise of palingenesis? Building upon Frank Kermode'€™s Sense of an Ending, where Kermode notes, "€œcorrelation between early modernist literature and authoritarianism which is more often noticed than explained: totalitarian theories of form matched or reflected by totalitarian politics,"€ Griffin argues that there is an ideological continuum where the animating myths of art made their way into the political realm; in particular Griffin suggests that none of the myths marked both modernism and fascism as strongly as the promise of palingenesis, rebirth—€”a new art for Modernism and the "€œnew man"€ for fascism. How do fascist aesthetics strive to create this "œnew man"€? What are fascism'€™s aesthetic modes of indoctrination and inculcation? <br /> <br />The panel, though, is also deeply interested in the possibility of refusing this appeal: how does anti-fascist modernist literature resist fascism without endorsing its palingenetic logic? What are the techniques of dissent and resistance that modernist literature offers? And, echoing the question of Mira Spiro (2013), does it matter? €œCan literary figures and their work be effective in political resistance?€ <br /> <br />Some suggested topics might include: the pedagogy of (proto)fascist youth groups; the formal as well as ideological work of bildungsroman; the aesthetics of fascist as well as antifascist propaganda; the role of technology in the fascist appeal as well as antifascist resistance; biographical and fictional accounts of resistance. Transnational work is encouraged. <br /> <br />Please submit an abstract of 300 words, along with a brief bio, to sibernst@usc.edu. Feel free to contact me with any questions as well. <br /> <br />This proposal is for MSA 19 Amsterdam. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Sanders Bernstein

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Book machines: modernist bibliography and the dawn of digital humanities


Despite the continued adoption of computing technology in literary studies, histories of the discipline widely overlook the extent to which computing itself emerged from modernist bibliography. Many of the designs for early computing platforms used in the codebreaking efforts of World War II were directly inspired by advancements in library and information science, including Vannevar Bush’s prototype for the Memex, an early microfilm reading environment. Indeed, the very concept of the document as a digital object emerges from book machines such as the comparator and the rapid selector. Both Fredson Bowers and Charles Hinman, foundational figures in the field of book history, were employed as cryptanalysts during World War II. This often overlooked connection between bibliography and cryptography, between reading books and writing code, finds its way into the canon of modernist literature, as well—Samuel Beckett worked as a spy for the allied forces, passing encoded microfilm documents and translating them across French and English. Beckett undertook such work in the years just prior to the composition of his Trilogy, explicitly described as “code books” and also translated across French and English. Given the fact that late modernist bibliography is also early computational cryptography, the modernist book exists as a core cultural artifact of a digital humanities. <br /> <br />Bringing such a history to light, this panel reads modernist books on digital computers while also understanding computers themselves as modernist books. Papers may cover a range of bibliographic practices, including but not limited to genetic criticism, writing under constraint, Oulipo, automatic writing, Surrealist experimentation, cut-up technique, typography, library and information science, cryptographic literature, and other experimental bibliographic methods. They will use digital methods to demonstrate and investigate these experimental modernist bibliographies; at the same time, papers will also reflect upon the role of such bibliographies in shaping digital methods in humanities scholarship. In particular, papers will collectively investigate “digital modernism” as a longstanding critical tradition that stretches well back into the twentieth century; in so doing, they will come to understand digital modernism today as a method for investigating modernist computing in the past, reframing digital scholarship as a form of epistemological archeology. While individual papers take a textual studies approach to modernist works, the panel as a whole will engage in a genetic criticism of digital modernism itself, tracing contemporary practices back to their roots in modernist writing methods. Through clear and rigorous restorations of digital modernism in the twentieth century, panelists will construct a more complete vision of digital modernism today. <br /> <br /> <br />If interested, please send a title, a 250 word abstract, and a 100 word bio to achristie@brocku.ca by January 25, 2017.

Conference Location: Amsterdam, NL
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Alex Christie

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Modernist Forms of Social Exclusion and Negative Affect


In recent years, critics such as Anne Cheng, Heather Love, Ann Cvetkovich, and Jonathan Flatley have explored negative feelings as important resources for theorizing the social. Drawing on this scholarship, our panel challenges the distinction between subjective alienation and collective marginalization, and how experiences of negative affects are instanced through narrative form. We are interested in reading modernist and late modernist forms that represent various accounts of stigma, nonbelonging, and self-dispossession, not simply in terms of individual predicaments, but as an archive of literary forms that afford these social experiences particular affective and ethical resonances. By so doing, our panel seeks to challenge the distinction between the personal and the political, reading affective form as as aesthetic hinge between the linked domains of experience. Despite the famed second-wave feminist formulation, "the personal is political," why are some narratives of social exclusion dismissible as "merely" subjective? How may the form of these narratives help us reframe questions of identity and positionality, of bad feeling and unbelonging? Can the ineluctably individual experience of "feeling bad" as depicted in modernist forms challenge prevailing notions about the proper relation between collectivity and subjectivity, notions that remain mired in the discourses of positive uplift and recuperating the ideal of collectivity? <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Possible topics: <br /> <br />Transnational dislocations, minority experience, representations of poverty and caste, narratives of racial uplift, "dirty" modernism, social realism, queer experience, the poetics and politics of form, including narrative form and the scenic method. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Octavio R. Gonzalez

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Authors' Rights / Human Rights


Authors’ Rights / Human Rights <br /> <br />This proposed panel examines how international organizations and authors’ associations reconfigured modernist authorship. How did authors come to have rights in the modernist period, and how were these rights analogous to human rights? Proposed papers can look at institutional configurations of authorship in international organizations like PEN International and UNESCO or domestic authors’ associations like the Society of Authors. Papers looking at the post-WWII period, when authors faced purge trials in a number of European countries, would be especially welcome. <br /> <br />The panel, if accepted, would be linked to the special stream ‘Human Rights, Borders, and Displacements’ at MSA 19 (Amsterdam, 10-13 August 2017). <br /> <br />Please send abstracts (150-250 words) and a short bio to Marius Hentea, marius.hentea@sprak.gu.se by 25 January 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 25, 2017

For more information, contact: Marius Hentea

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ASSEMBLING MODERNISM


Panel Description: <br /> <br />ASSEMBLING MODERNISM <br /> <br />As an aesthetic practice, modernist montage is premised upon the creation of multiple antinomies. In the visual arts montage creates a problematic related to of visual antinomy: the artifact's foregrounding of the act of vision while problematizing transparency. In literature, techniques associated with montage, such as juxtaposition, overlay, counterpoint, or cross-cutting, aim to disrupt narrative continuities in the service of a more faithful realism. This panel will examine contradictory impulses implicit in modes of modernist montage—cinematic, photographic, literary, painterly, archival, and journalistic—in order to explore how narrative and narrativity, vision and visuality, and tactility and abstraction in works of literary modernism, the visual and the graphic arts, and journalistic reporting become reconsidered through montage as an aesthetic, technological, bodily, and psychological phenomenon. The broader question this panel poses concerns how the indexical codes of the visual media and graphic arts and the symbolic codes of the literary medium become reciprocally translatable in their appropriation of montage. <br /> <br />Topics may include: <br />—how intermedial modernist works negotiate the antagonisms inherent to different media; <br />—how modernist works create multi-dimensional historical records to capture the experience of urban modernity; <br />—how modernist works negotiate the difference between the stark realities of everyday living and ordinary objects and the fluidity of perception and understanding. <br /> <br />Please send 200-word abstracts with short biographical information to: <br />Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva (irina.goloubeva@english.su.se) by 12 January 2017, 12 noon. <br /> <br />The date and the location for MSA 19 conference: August 10–13, 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. <br /> <br />Dr. Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva, <br />Assistant Professor <br />Stockholm University <br />Department of English <br />SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden <br />irina.goloubeva@english.su.se <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 12, 2017

For more information, contact: Irina R Goloubeva

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Interiors/Interiorities: Modern Design and Literary Form (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


This is a CFP for a panel proposal to the Modernist Studies Association (MSA) conference in Amsterdam, August 10-13, 2017 (https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa19/index.html) <br /> <br />Modernism’s preoccupation with form is no secret. While modernist texts are often characterized by their formal opacity, density, and increasing demands on readerly attention, modernist design and architecture tends toward simplicity of form, functionality, sleekness, and transparency. Examining these two distinct and often mutually exclusive versions of form alongside one another sets up an encounter not just between two disciplines or discourses, but between alternative models for imagining the subject'€™s encounter with an aesthetic object, €”be it through reading, viewing, or inhabiting. This panel will explore the interpretative pathways opened up by situating a discussion of modernist literary form alongside modern design in its various tenets and iterations. <br /> <br />What theoretical, historical, and discursive linkages and/or rifts emerge when we examine modernist texts with design and architecture? What are the relationships between textual versions of interiority and the structures or interiors subjects inhabit, frequent, and transgress? How might we think of aesthetic experience in the modernist novel through theories of spatial design and setting, instead of paying heed only to its formal innovations in temporality? Can modern design’s careful attention to the surface tell us something about how to read textual surfaces? Does the novel as a technology for storing, converting, and transmitting information undergo significant changes alongside technological advancements and their uses for/as aesthetic practices and objects? Building on recent work by authors such as Anne Cheng, Caroline Levine, and David Alworth, this panel seeks to enter contemporary conversations on new€ formalism and forms of reading by asking how, in modernist studies, we might think literature and design together. <br /> <br />Among other topics, proposals might address: the role of emerging media and technology across design practices and literary works; the relationship between free indirect discourse, stream of consciousness, and different ways of understanding interiority in modernist texts and the interiors, spaces, settings, and sites subjects inhabit; how new models for reading can engage with spatial concerns in literary form; how specific works or authors converse with aesthetic practices and design principles; how subjective experience is affectively, phenomenologically, or cognitively theorized by modern authors, designers, and architects. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 200 to 300 words along with a brief bio to michelle_rada@brown.edu no later than January 10th, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 10, 2017

For more information, contact: Michelle Rada

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Fashion, Modernism, History (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


This panel focuses on the significance of fashion to histories of modernity, and to modernism's engagement with history. In the works of canonical modernists and in the writings of women associated with "middlebrow" and popular literature in the interwar period, fashion functions to represent, negotiate, and problematize the relationship between the past, the present, and the future. Possible questions to be addressed include: <br /> <br />-- How did modernist texts engage with fashion, fashionability, and historical style? <br /> <br />-- In what ways do fashion, clothing, and costume in modernist texts illuminate or complicate notions of literary and historical periodization? <br /> <br />-- What insights can be gained into the presence of the past by exploring the role of fashion in modernism's emphasis on "making it new"? <br /> <br />Of particular interest are papers that engage with the multiple contexts in which fashion circulated in the early twentieth century -- not only in modernist literature, but also in popular periodicals, advertising, design and illustration. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 150-200 words and a brief bio to Lise Shapiro Sanders at lsanders@hampshire.edu by January 10, 2017. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session). <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 10, 2017

For more information, contact: Lise Shapiro Sanders

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Late Modernism in the American Scene (MSA 19, Amsterdam)


Recent scholarship has employed the term “late modernism” to describe a set of wide-ranging changes to English national culture, in and after the 1930s: a sense of the British Empire’s imminent decline, a necessary reaction to global war, and a growing intellectual reconciliation between politics and art, exemplified by the Mass Observation movement. Modernist studies, however, has not yet established such a guiding narrative for late modernism in the United States. This panel offers a platform for considering what late modernism might look like in the American scene, from the Depression of the 1930s to the upheavals of the 1960s. Possible topics include: approaches to periodizing an American late modernism (changes in political history, social movements, aesthetic theory); how to reconcile modernism’s transnational circulation with the resurgence in nationalist thinking at midcentury; the punctual importance of the Depression or World War II to American modernism; authors whose works are distinctly “late” modern or whose work exhibits a “late” phase; and late modernist periodical culture. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Ian Afflerbach at ian.afflerbach@lmc.gatech.edu by January 9th. <br /> <br />Conference Location: Modernist Studies Association 19, Amsterdam, Netherlands <br />Conference Dates: August 10-13, 2017 <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 09, 2017

For more information, contact: Ian Afflerbach

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Collage and Its Cognates as Feminist Methodology


The history of modernist collage is a varied one. Futurism, influenced by Cubist techniques, turned to collage as a method for subverting traditional, representational artwork; Dada’s absurd arrangements of advertising images and print offered a scathing critique of capitalism; Surrealism’s bizarre juxtapositions sought to empower and stimulate the subconscious. The politics and motivations undergirding these, and other movements that employing collage and its related art forms, differ greatly and yet they share an attention to the power of the ephemeral, the quotidian, and the overlooked, drawing both implicitly and explicitly from the Baudelaire’s trope of poet/artist as ragpicker, as a person who must sift through the trash of modernity in order to find beauty and meaning. <br /> <br />As subjects of collage, women figure prominently but as practitioners, but they are less commonly recognized despite the unexpected overlap between the organizing ideas of collage—its focus on the materials of “low” or pop culture, its attention to everydayness—and the modes of various feminist interventions. As such, this panel invites papers that investigate collage and its cognates—broadly interpreted—as feminist practice. Does collage provide an unexpectedly hospitable method for feminist aesthetic interventions? Is there a sense of affinity between the woman artist and the “feminized,” (to borrow from Huyssen) artifacts of mass culture? How does the interplay between visual and textual collage energize the feminist interventions of women’s writing? Does collage animate the artist/ragpicker metaphor in ways that are particularly salient for women artists? <br /> <br />Please send 200 word abstracts and a short bio to algreen@msu.edu by January 9. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 09, 2017

For more information, contact: Anna Green

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Midcentury Monstrosities


The new modernist studies have been hard at work dissolving the tidy binaries of twentieth-century periodization (modernism vs. postmodernism, modern vs. contemporary, pre-1945 vs. post-1945). In part, this process has involved attending with seriousness to the literary production of the midcentury. Yet as the underexplored decades of the 1930s, 40s, 50s, and 60s take their place in these richer accounts of twentieth-century literary history, the focus tends to be on their orderly and earnest aspects: the documentary and life-writing of the postwar years; the abundance of middlebrow narrative forms, including genre fiction; the clean, functional lines of mid-century modern architecture; the miniaturization and familiarization of the world in LIFE Magazine. Sandwiched between what literary history typically tells us are the experimental extremes of the modern and the contemporary, the midcentury remains, in many critical accounts, an unadventurous moment in an otherwise tumultuous century. <br /> <br />This panel seeks papers that challenge this account of the midcentury by addressing “midcentury monstrosities”: midcentury texts that do not conform to critical consensus or moments of monstrosity in midcentury texts. The category of the “monstrous” invites attention to the messy, the shocking, the outrageous, the atrocious. What work does the monstrous do in the midcentury’s responses to modernism and world war? What counts as formal monstrosity in the midcentury, and how might midcentury monstrous forms be situated in broader accounts of twentieth-century experimental aesthetics? How does the monstrous challenge our understanding of the midcentury and literary history more broadly? <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br /> <br />Disability, debility, and disfigurement at the levels of character or form <br />Mutation, cyborgs, and the erosion of distinctions between nature/culture, human/animal, or human/machine <br />Gargantuan forms or scales <br />Bad politics and their monstrous outcomes <br />Insidious institutions (e.g., military, finance, intelligence) <br />The horrors of capitalism <br /> <br />Submit abstracts of 250 words and brief bios to Rebecah Pulsifer at pulsife2@illinois.edu by January 9, 2017.

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 09, 2017

For more information, contact: Rebecah Pulsifer

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New Media and the Modernist Political Imagination


<br />The tension between reactionary and revolutionary politics in modernism has been the source of contentious debate for decades. Today, this question is animated with new urgency by the widespread reactionary turn in Euro-American politics. Then as now, new forms of political organization and new ideologies emerge in tandem with new modes of communication, which make imaginable and even practicable reactionary as well as progressive revolutions in the social and political spheres. In this anniversary year of the Russian Revolution, we are looking for proposals that will address the imbrication of modernist politics (left, right, and other) with the new media imaginaries that emerged in the early twentieth century. Proposals may touch on media utopias/antiutopias, forms of mass politics, stylistic forms that engage with new media's promises of political transformation. Abstract of 250 words are due Jan. 7th to ampri@uchicago.edu <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, NL
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 07, 2017

For more information, contact: Aleksandr Prigozhin

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Feeling Queer/ Queer Feeling as Deviant Modernist Archive


"Oh, Mrs. Honeychurch, the oddest people! The queerest people! For our part we liked them, didn't we?" <br /> <br />As Forster's quotation from A Room With a View suggests, oddness and queerness are often coupled (the odd couple). Queer folk are apparently likable by those with the taste to appreciate their piquancy. Yet those queer characters might refuse efforts to incorporate their deviancy into normative desires. While Mr. Beebe and Mrs. Honeychurch might feel that "for our part we liked them," modernist queers are often different, deviant, and difficult. This circulation of feeling underscores the tangle of pleasures and appeal, of surprise and fascination, of attraction and repulsion in queer relations. As such, this panel looks to how queer authors, texts, and characters imagine themselves as outsiders who feel their difference and evoke different feelings. <br /> <br />During a period when queer still meant "œodd" or "bent" while also newly signifying sexual and gender deviance, how do these categories overlap? How do modernists combine, pair together, or complicate shared feelings of oddity and sexual difference? How might queer feelings of marginality inspire desires beyond the moment of the sexual encounter, leading to new ways of being? Alternatively, how can the figure of the strange-fellow, the queer-bird, and the misfit, be traced within ostensibly ‘straight’ or unbent texts? Found in seemingly unexpected places, how do these queer fictions and feelings reimagine or appropriate normative narratives? <br /> <br />To answer these questions, this panel aims to contribute to recent studies of the modernist archive of queer feeling. Heather Love, for example, has recovered an alternative history of queer "feeling backwards" that was crucial to understanding sexual and "œgender outsiders" in the early modernist period (2007). Conversely, Michael Snediker challenged queer theory by drawing on modern lyric poetry with his "amorous logics"™ of queer optimism (2009), to name but two. This panel will build upon these insights and expand the affective archive to include "the oddest people! The queerest people!" in order to challenge what has become normative in the modernist imaginary. The following are some of the questions animating the proposal: <br /> <br />-What does queerness feel like in modernism? <br />-Are there specifically queer feelings in the modernist imaginary? <br />-How do the aesthetic, politics, or histories of gender, sexuality, and queerness intersect with emotion and affect in modernism? What kind of queer becomings are made tangible in the nexus of queerness and affect? <br />-What challenges to normative aesthetics are made by queer artists? <br /> <br />This CFP is for the MSA conference 2017. Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Wendy Truran truran2@illinois.edu by Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017. Please include your name, along with a brief scholarly biography, in your email. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 05, 2017

For more information, contact: Todd Nordgren

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The Modernist Body Beyond the Brain


This CFP is for a proposed panel at MSA19 in Amsterdam, August 10-13, 2017. <br /> <br />The Modernist Body Beyond the Brain <br /> <br />Modernist literature is often characterized as going beyond conscious experience, but in general that has meant going into deep, irrational or unconscious forms of mentality. Recent theories of new materialism and animal studies point to something else outside consciousness: the body and its involvement in biological and ecological systems. So this panel seeks papers exploring how modernist works include a sense of the human body having its own ways of moving and functioning beyond control of the brain. Papers are welcome on modernist representations of humans as biological or ecological systems, or of humans as animals, or of body parts functioning beyond or without the control of the brain. <br /> <br />If you would like to join this panel, please send by January 4, 2017 a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Michael Tratner at mtratner@brynmawr.edu <br /> Feel free to contact Michael with any questions in advance of the deadline. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 04, 2017

For more information, contact: Michael Tratner

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Modern(ist) Weddings


Work on modern(ist) weddings is invited for a proposed panel at the Modernist Studies Association conference in Amsterdam (August 10-13, 2017). The following are some of the questions animating the proposal: <br /> <br />• How did the wedding-as-event – and related figures such as the bride – transform in the first decades of the twentieth century? <br />• In what ways did weddings express or counter the modernist impulse to innovate? <br />• How were representations of weddings marked by fantasies about changing gendered and sexual subject positions? <br />• What might images of modern weddings tell us about class and racial ambiguity? <br />• Can genealogies of influence be traced between the modernist period and the so-called “wedding-industrial complex” of today? <br /> <br />The panel is envisioned as interdisciplinary and primarily concerned with the mediation of weddings, in genres that could include periodicals, conduct manuals, advertising, literature, visual art, film, and social scientific scholarship. <br /> <br />Please send a 150-word abstract, along with a 100-word biography, to Ilya Parkins (ilya.parkins@ubc.ca) by January 3. Feel free to contact Ilya with any questions in advance of the deadline. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 03, 2017

For more information, contact: Ilya Parkins

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Modernist Mediascapes


Arjun Appadurai’s 1990 coinage, the “mediascape,” a term signifying the entire range of global information systems, provides a useful framework for a panel that considers the varieties of modernist engagements (and entanglements) with popular media. Possible topics might include (but are not limited to) the following: investigative journalism (including the “yellow” press, or “muckraking” reportage); wartime propaganda and the social engineering of information; advertising and public relations; newsreels and radio broadcasts; journalists or newsmakers as fictional characters. We are particularly interested in approaches that place modernist writers and texts in dialogue with recent debates about truth and the public sphere. We welcome proposals that bring international and/or interdisciplinary approaches to the topic. Please send 250-word abstracts and brief bios to shawkins@unt.edu by Jan. 3rd.

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 03, 2017

For more information, contact: Stephanie Hawkins

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Modernism and Islam


I’m seeking a third panelist for a proposed panel for MSA 19 in Amsterdam, 10-13 August 2017. If you are interested in speaking about some aspect of modernism and Islam, Indian/Arabian/Persian/North African modernisms, British/American/European modernist reception of or interest in these parts of the world, reception of British/American/European modernism in the Indian subcontinent/Arab countries/Iran/North Africa, or women and Islam in modernism, please contact Heather Fielding at hfieldin@pnw.edu by 3 January 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 13, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 03, 2017

For more information, contact: Heather Fielding

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Special Journal Issue: New England and the Great War


Call for Papers: Journal Special Issue <br />New England and the Great War <br /> <br />The New England Quarterly is entertaining submissions for a special issue commemorating New England's participation in the Great War. Successful submissions will be consistent with The Quarterly's traditional editorial policy of reflecting all aspects of the history of New England's life and letters as they reflect an organic part of the United States and the world. The editors are especially interested in topics that address hitherto unrepresented groups, deepen our understanding of connections of the regional, national, and global consequences of the Great War, and that stimulate new fields of inquiry. <br /> <br />Submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. <br />Essays submitted for the commemorative issue cannot be considered after 1 January 2017. <br /> <br />Please submit electronic copies in Word and pdf to neq@umb.edu; an additional hard copy should be submitted to <br /> <br />The New England Quarterly <br />c/o Jonathan M. Chu <br />Department of History <br />University of Massachusetts, Boston <br />100 Morrissey Blvd. <br />Boston, MA 02125 <br />

Conference Location: none, none
Conference Starts: September 15, 2016
Conference Ends: January 01, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: January 01, 2017

For more information, contact: Len Von Morze

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