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The Space Between: Literature and Culture 1914-1945


NOTE: This call for submissions is for a journal. Submissions will of course be considered on an ongoing basis; there is no deadline. <br /> <br />The Space Between: Literature and Culture 1914-1945 is an annual peer-reviewed open-access journal devoted to interdisciplinary scholarship on the period bracketed by the two World Wars. Now in its eleventh year, the journal seeks to publish research on lesser-known writers and artists and understudied topics of the intermodernist period, including literary and cultural responses to the First and Second World Wars. <br /> <br />Submissions for general issues are considered on an ongoing basis; proposals for special issues are also welcome. <br /> <br />Please visit www.spacebetweenjournal.org for the current issue as well as full editorial guidelines. Submissions and queries should be directed to the editor, Janine Utell, at janine.utell@gmail.com. Those interested in contributing book reviews and review essays should contact the book review editor, JJ Butts, at jj.butts@simpson.edu.

Conference Location: ongoing, ongoing
Conference Starts: March 01, 2016
Conference Ends: December 31, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: December 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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Special issue of the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies: &quot;Seriality&quot;


"œSeriality" <br />A special issue of the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies <br />Guest editor: Matthew Levay, Idaho State University <br /> <br /> <br />This special issue of the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies will explore the idea of seriality -- theoretical, material, temporal -- as a dominant but critically understudied element of both modern periodicals and periodical studies. We might consider seriality to be the defining feature of all periodicals; signaling in its name a temporal pattern of production and consumption, the periodical is a material object born from the logic of seriality. It is constituted by the regular appearance of successive installments, the links and gaps that emerge between those installments, and the ability of readers to devote the time necessary for repeated, continuous reading. In each case, seriality marks the periodical as a continually evolving form, perpetually and necessarily repeating itself while also becoming something new. <br /> <br />Yet this does not mean that seriality operates transparently, or equally, within all periodical genres, or within the minds of readers. After all, readers can consume individual issues of periodicals out of sequence or ignore some installments altogether, while writers can either highlight or disregard the precedents set in previous issues. Moreover, seriality need not be defined wholly within the material terms of production and consumption, and in that sense might offer an explicitly theoretical complement to the historical and archival interventions of current scholarship in periodical studies. If, for Sartre, seriality referenced the alienated social collective, loosely organized around a passive receptivity to everyday conditions, then how can periodical studies, with its emphasis on the recurrent interactions between individuals and periodical texts, chart new paths for understanding modern social formations and the routines that define them? Likewise, how can periodicals help us productively revisit the “bound” and “unbound” serialities that Benedict Anderson posited as constitutive features of nationalism and ethnicity? <br /> <br />Prospective essays might take up a diverse range of questions: <br /> <br />* How does a periodical'™s publication schedule (daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annually) influence its contents? <br />* How did writers, illustrators, editors, and publishers negotiate the demands of serial production? <br />* How do periodicals remark upon (or deny) their status as serial objects, and does that status influence public and critical perceptions of a periodical’s cultural standing (as highbrow, lowbrow, or middlebrow)? <br />* What are the aesthetics of seriality, and where do those values appear in modern periodicals? <br />* Does seriality operate differently in different periodical genres (e.g., newspapers, little magazines, comic books, pulps, etc.), national contexts, and/or historical periods? <br />* What does it mean for an audience to read serially, and how might disruptions to serial consumption yield productive insights into the physical practices of reading? <br />* What relationships can we chart among seriality, distant reading, and close reading? <br />* How can digital archives reveal new or underexplored serial elements within particular periodicals? <br />* How can theoretical approaches to seriality reorient or reframe longstanding debates within periodical studies? <br /> <br />To propose an essay for this special issue, please submit a 300-word abstract to levamatt_at_isu.edu. Deadline for abstracts is December 31, 2016. Accepted essays should be 6000-8000 words long, and will be due on August 1, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: December 31, 2016
Conference Ends: December 31, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: December 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Matthew Levay

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Gestures in texts and the visual arts


CALL FOR PAPERS <br />INTERFACES international conference <br />Université de Bourgogne, 29 & 30 June 2017 <br /> <br />GESTURES IN TEXTS AND THE VISUAL ARTS <br /> <br />Following up on its exploration of intermediality and text-image relations, the Centre de Recherche Texte/Image/Langage of Université de Bourgogne-Franche-Comté is organizing a bilingual (French-English) international conference on the inscription of gestures in texts and the visual arts from the early modern period. <br />As part and parcel of the work of artists, craftsmen, writers and laborers, gestures combine an intention, technical skills, actualisation, thought in action as well as expenditure of energy. The variety of their meanings and functions offers promising perspectives in the field of interdisciplinary and intermedial studies. In The Pleasure in Drawing (2013), Jean-Luc Nancy construes the draughtsman’s gesture as “the essence and excellence” of gestures, whether they belong “to the dancer, the musician, or filmmaker”: “this gesture is above all what is most proper to a gesture: an immanent signifiance, in other words, without the sign taking off toward the signified, but a sense that is offered right at the body [à même le corps], right at a body that becomes less active, efficient, or operative than the body that gives itself over to a motion—to an emotion—that received it, coming from beyond its functional corporeality” (p. 39, transl. Philip Armstrong). Accordingly, the conference will focus on the inchoative and technical aspects of gestures in the genesis of a work, taking into account its fabrication as well as its representation. We will explore the contemporary theoretical and technical implications of gestures—rather than draw typologies or describe the semiotics of gestures since there already exists a substantial critical corpus in that field. <br />We invite abstracts (in English or French) that explore the following themes in this non-exhaustive list: <br />- The conference will specifically examine the role, treatment and inscription of gestures in artistic and literary practices as well as in aesthetic discourse. We welcome state-of-the-art research in the field of intermedial studies as well as explorations of recent technological applications such as digital productions or augmented reality. <br />- Beyond the mere recording of movement, we wish to address the transcription of gestures in texts and still or moving images, which may encompass discussions of the aesthetics of notation systems or of ekphrasis. Papers may explore how artistic and poetical works engage with (actual or imaginary) gestures, and in doing so, partake in the interdisciplinary cultural practice of performance art. This may entail an analysis of the relation between gestural writings/images and the aesthetics of reception. Of equal interest is how a poetics of gesture may be defined as it is enacted in artists’ and writers’ performances. <br />- We also invite papers that tackle the interaction of gestures and tools/instruments in the fields of education, cognition, art and craft and in a variety of practices ranging from agricultural labour to music and dance. This may include innovative representations of technical and professional gestures, but also the recording of living gestures from an anthropological and ethnographic perspective. <br />- The suggested discussions above may tie in with analyses of symbolic systems. Therefore we will also welcome papers that deal with the figurative aspects of gestures insofar as they signify heroic or memorable actions (as they are recorded in chansons de geste), such as historic and political gestures along with their social, cultural and ideological dimension. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract (in French or in English) before 31 December 2016 to the following address: 2017Interfaces@googlegroups.com <br /> <br />Notification: 31 January 2017. <br />The programme will be finalized in March 2017. <br /> <br />Organizing committee: Sophie Aymes, Marie-Odile Bernez, Bénédicte Coste, Véronique Liard, Fiona McMahon, Christelle Serée-Chaussinand, Shannon Wells. <br />

Conference Location: Dijon, France
Conference Starts: June 29, 2017
Conference Ends: June 30, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: December 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Sophie Aymes

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London Calling: D. H. Lawrence and the Metropolis


THE 14TH INTERNATIONAL D.H. LAWRENCE CONFERENCE, JULY 3-8 2017, LONDON, AT THE COLLEGE OF THE HUMANITIES, BEDFORD SQUARE. Send an abstract of up to 500 words to the Executive Director, Dr. Catherine Brown: catherinelawrencelondon@gmail.com by midnight on 31st December 2016. The conference welcomes papers on topics including but not limited to Lawrence’s experiences of, and/or reactions to, London and its various social groups and geographical districts <br />• Lawrence’s relationships with individual Londoners <br />• Lawrence’s interactions with London-based journals and publishers <br />• The suppression of The Rainbow <br />• The premiere of David in London <br />• Lawrence’s exhibition of paintings at the Warren Street Gallery <br />• Works written by Lawrence while he was resident in London <br />• Lawrence’s responses to and thoughts about cities in general <br />FOR FURTHER DETAILS SEE CONFERENCE WEBSITE: http://dhlawrencesociety.com/home/14thinternational-d-h-lawrence-conference-london. <br />

Conference Location: London, England
Conference Starts: July 03, 2017
Conference Ends: July 08, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: December 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Dr. Catherine Brown

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Modernist Comics


MSA 19: Modernist Comics <br /> <br />The present-day genre of comics might begin with Rodolphe Topffer in 1837; Punch magazine’s 1843 satiric cartoons; Richard F. Outcault's 1895 The Yellow Kid; Famous Funnies, the U.S. magazine that standardized the comic book format in 1934; or Action Comics, the 1938 series that turned the fledgling industry into mass culture in a single bound. When defined by formal qualities, however, comics date to at least the Medieval period, with a long tradition of panels and speech scrolls in illuminated manuscripts establishing conventions that would become standard in newspaper strips and graphic novels in the 20th century. Because the rise of comics coincides with the ebbing of Modernism, and because Modernism often is defined in opposition to popular culture, the notion of “Modernist Comics” might appear oxymoronic. As Jackson Ayers writes in the introduction to a three-essay “Comics and Modernism” section in the Winter 2016 Journal of Modern Literature, comics are “Modernism’s wretched Other.” Yet the wordless woodcut novels of Frans Masereel, Lynd Ward, Giacomo Patri, and Laurence Hyde, as well as Max Ernst's surrealist collage novel A Week of Kindness, can be analyzed fruitfully via comics theory. Further, such works as the image-incorporating poetry of Langston Hughes, the concrete experiments of Guillaume Apollinaire, and even the page-space arrangements of William Carlos Williams all employ visual strategies common to later comics and comics poetry. Finally, the comics of George Herriman, Lyonel Feininger, Windsor McCay, and other early 20th century creators might be reevaluated as Modernist texts. <br /> <br />This panel will explore such lines of inquiry between Modernism and comics. Please email abstracts (200-300 words) and a brief scholarly bio to Chris Gavaler (gavalerc@wlu.edu) by December 13, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference Starts: August 10, 2017
Conference Ends: August 12, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: December 13, 2016

For more information, contact: Chris Gavaler

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Modernist Resilience at the End of the World(s), Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) Biennial Conference


Ecocritical modernist scholars such as Greg Garrard, Anne Raine, and Kelly Sultzbach insist on historicizing modernism in order to effectively critique the relationship between the literatures of this period and the environment. Taking its cue from such methodologies, this panel will explore how modernist writers respond to inhabiting the moment and place of a world at war. In the final century of the millennia, many authors and artists responded to World War I and II through representations of transformed or damaged landscapes and environments. The post-war British landscape, for example, is mainly stamped by the dark depictions of T. S. Eliot’s Waste Land, D. H. Lawrence’s post-pastoral Eastwood, or Virginia Woolf’s urbanatural London. Though many have depicted a landscape of decline, degradation, or environmental apocalypse, this panel seeks to delve deeper into the ways modernist landscapes of the interwar and postwar periods go beyond destruction to depict forms and affects of resilience, restoration, or mourning. <br /> <br />In particular, we invite speakers to send abstracts that examine the literature of these inter-and-post-war years—from roughly the 1920s and 30s, to the 1950s and 60s—the afterwards of the World War. Submissions are welcome to address any genre—from novel to poetry to film—within the Anglophone modernist oeuvre. This is a period and a literary tradition critically examined more for its desire to escape the material shackles of the body and world for a transcendent subjecthood, than its desire to restore or reclaim a landscape of home after the shattering impacts of the wars. We hope the conversation started by this panel, therefore, will begin to uncover the multiplicity of the unanticipated environmental affects and attitudes existing in the modernist era. <br /> <br />Papers may address but should not limit themselves to the following questions: <br /> <br />-How do modernist writers react to post-war environmental degradation? <br />-How does modernist impressionism as a technique contribute to the contingency of representing environmental damages on post-war landscape? <br />-Do modernist texts offer any chance of recovery for the post-war landscape? <br />-How does modernist play with temporality affect notions of environmental resilience, restoration, and recovery? <br />-How are the decadent and other fin de siècle styles in conversation with contemporary materialities of corrosion and rust? <br />-How does the appearance of residual romanticism in the literature of WWI represent the relationship between modernist aesthetics and “nature”? <br />-How is “the natural” entangled in apocalyptic visions of world war in post-war literatures? <br />-How is the birth of the discipline of ecology, in the 1930s, entangled in the modernist cultural milieu? <br />-How is the trope of “returns,” which pervades this era, dependent on or in tension with ideas of “the natural”? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300-500 words to the organizers of the panel by December 1st: Molly Hall (molly_hall@my.uri.edu) and Gulsah Gocmen (gulshgocmen@gmail.com). You will be notified of the status of your abstract by December 7th. ASLE organizers will notify panels of acceptances by February 15th, 2017. <br />

Conference Location: Detroit, MI, United States
Conference Starts: June 20, 2017
Conference Ends: June 24, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: December 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Molly Hall and Gulsah Gocmen

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Setting - Modernism/modernity Print Plus cluster


Call for Papers: Modernist Setting <br />Prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform <br />Edited by: Dora Zhang and Hannah Freed-Thall <br /> <br />Proposed titles/abstracts: October 31, 2016 <br />Complete essays: March 15, 2017 <br /> <br />This cluster of conference-length, theoretically-adventurous essays will explore the concept of "setting"€ in the modernist context. Encompassing physical space and geographical location as well as atmosphere, mood, weather, tone, and other ambient phenomena of everyday life, setting has tended to fade into the critical background. What happens if we approach setting not as a secondary category, or mere inert backdrop, but as a primary shaping force of literary and visual form? <br /> <br />Modernism reconfigures literary geography by venturing into a variety of previously unrepresented spaces, from an outhouse in Dublin to a golf course in Yoknapatawpha County to a plantation settlement village in colonial Barbados. What is the relation between the formal concept of “setting” and the geographical idea of “place”? And how is this relation affected by the location of textual production itself, e.g. Western Europe, Latin America, or the Pacific Rim? <br /> <br />The early twentieth century bore witness to theories of setting that are now largely forgotten, including Hellpach on environmental psychology, Ebeling on “space as membrane,” and Uexküll on “Umwelt.” How did these and other such ideas bear on the cultural production of the period? <br /> <br />How do different media attune readers, spectators, or listeners to the mood of a room, the humidity of a season, the quality of a light, or the acoustic texture of a landscape? And how does the recent ecological turn in criticism affect our understanding of literary space, enabling us for the first time to perceive a climate, or even a geological epoch, as setting? <br /> <br />Papers should be balanced toward the inventive and the provocative, along the lines of a virtual roundtable talk (2000-3000 word limit). Contributors are especially encouraged to draw on the unique possibilities afforded by the digital platform. Please send titles and 500-word abstracts to Dora Zhang (dyzhang@berkeley.edu) and Hannah Freed-Thall (hannah_freed-thall@brown.edu) by October 31, 2016. 6-8 contributors will be invited to submit essays by March 15, 2017, after which the entire cluster will be sent out for peer review. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: September 05, 2016
Conference Ends: October 31, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: October 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Dora Zhang & Hannah Freed-Thall

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Edited Collection: Oceanic Modernism


OCEANIC MODERNISM <br />CALL FOR PAPERS FOR EDITED COLLECTION <br /> <br />Editors: Matthew Hayward and Maebh Long <br />(University of the South Pacific) <br /> <br /> <br />In 1987, Raymond Williams' 'When was Modernism' questioned the way in which a narrow selection of European and American writers had come to stand for an entire epoch. In the two decades since, modernist studies has undergone a radical reorientation, and critics such as Susan Stanford Friedman, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Andreas Huyssen, Simon Gikandi, Laura Doyle and Laura Winkiel have continued to reassess the temporalities, spatialities and formal components of modernism and modernity. The received, Eurocentric conception is giving way to new frameworks - ”alternative modernities, multiple modernities, modernity at large, new world modernisms, geomodernisms, transnational modernisms - ”which recognise the countless other experiences and articulations of a modernity now seen as global and interactive. While power relations remain uneven, in literature as in economics, assumptions of Western priority no longer hold. As the 'new modernisms€' have shown, models of production predicated on a self-determining European core and a derivative periphery not only deny the creative agencies of the greater part of the modern world, they misconstrue the already compromised nature of the so-called 'classical'™ forms themselves. Now a contested term, modernism no longer simply denotes a particular aesthetic movement, born and perfected in Europe and America in the first decades of the last century. In a global sense, it names a range of aesthetic responses, to a modernity experienced in different ways, by different people, at different times. <br /> <br />As far-reaching as this critical revaluation may have been, Oceania remains largely ignored in modernist studies. With few notable exceptions, collections on global modernisms have left out the region altogether, quietly implying either that Oceania has had no aesthetic responses to modernity, or that it has had no modernity at all. Yet from at least the 1960s, Pacific writers and artists have been explicitly and self-consciously engaged in articulating Oceanic modernities. In a movement closely related to postcolonial independence in some countries, and to indigenous rights movements in others, Oceanians explored tensions between tradition and modernity, female and male, the village and the city, local and foreign, the indigenous and the indentured. These artists challenged and adapted all manner of inheritances, from the rich oral and other expressive traditions of the Pacific, including weaving, pottery, dance and tattooing, to other world modernisms, to the Indian literary and mythical heritage brought to the region, often forcibly, through the indentured labour system. Imbricated and transnational, Oceanic art and literature are thus eminently modern, with modernity understood not simply as rupture, amalgamation and change, but€ following Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas and Zigmunt Bauman”, as the conscious reflection on the contemporary. <br /> <br />This edited collection positions this aesthetic movement as an Oceanic modernism. It considers the relationship between Oceanic works and the modernities from which they emerged; the relationship between Oceanic works and other modernisms, however so defined; and the advantages and limitations of applying the modernist rubric to Oceanic works. We invite submissions that consider Oceanic modernism/modernity, with possible topics including but not limited to: <br /> <br />Literature, Art, Theatre, Dance <br />Weaving, Tattoos, Architecture, Cultural Practices <br />Colonialism and Postcolonialism <br />Nationalism and Transnationalism <br />Independence, Indigeneity and Indenture <br />Tradition and Modernisation <br />Globalisation and Capitalism <br />Gender, Racial and Cultural Relations <br />Influence, Adaptation and Appropriation <br /> <br />Please send your title and a 500-word abstract to oceanicmodernisms@gmail.com by 30 September, 2016. <br /> <br />Completed essays will be due by 31 January, 2017. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: None, None
Conference Starts: September 30, 2016
Conference Ends: January 31, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Matthew Hayward and Maebh Long

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What Is the Scale of the Literary Object? -- M/m Print Plus Platform


Call for Papers: “What is the Scale of the Literary Object?” <br />Prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform <br />Edited by Rebecca L. Walkowitz <br />Proposed titles/abstracts: Sept 30, 2016 <br />Brief essays due: Feb 28, 2017 <br /> <br />This cluster of brief essays will explore scalar questions related to the size and quantity of the literary object. How big is the literary object? How many objects is the literary object? Scholars have asked how new geographies (the region, the nation, the planet, the ocean, etc.) transform the archive and methods of modernist studies. This cluster proposes to bracket ongoing questions about territorial scale in order to focus on questions about the scale of the work. <br />How do the aims of our research change when we deal with very large or very small amounts of data, or when we move across categories of data (media, language, formats, editions, paratexts, institutions, etc.) that multiply or disperse the objects we consider? <br /> <br />What kinds of research questions can be asked, or animated, if we change the size and quantity of the literary object? <br /> <br />Of course, thinking about size and quantity may lead back to thinking about geography and political collectivity, but the idea for this cluster is to give priority to a conversation about how we count, and how we constitute, the work. <br /> <br />Essays for this peer-reviewed cluster should feel free to tackle the eponymous question creatively, narrowly, speculatively, or tendentiously. Please send titles and abstracts for proposed essays to Rebecca Walkowitz (rebecca.walkowitz@rutgers.edu) by September 30, 2016. Authors are welcome to write sooner with prospective topics or queries. In October, 6-8 contributions will be chosen, based on the abstracts and selecting for breadth as well as impact. Essays (2000-3000 words max.) will be due February 28, 2017. The cluster will then be sent out for peer-review through the usual Modernism/modernity process. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: n/a, n/a
Conference Starts: August 10, 2016
Conference Ends: September 30, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Rebecca Walkowitz

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'What about It?': Science, Nature, Self, and Cummings


The E. E. Cummings Society and the Society's journal, Spring, invites abstracts for 20-minute papers for the 45th annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, February 23-25, 2017, at the University of Louisville (http://www.thelouisvilleconference.com). This session welcomes papers on elements of Cummings' modernism, cultural aesthetics, genre issues and visual effects, critical reception, and interactions with other modernists. We particularly welcome papers on Cummings' aesthetic and poetic modernism as a response to modern science, its theories of matter, space, and time, and its impact on so-called progress, in addition to his avant-garde testament to the radical changes of twentieth-century visual culture. To what extent does Cummings' asyntactic poetic style and continued typographic experimentation respond to the post-Einsteinian understanding of "space-time" and to what extent does Cummings find the new science problematic? We are interested in papers that examine Cummings' reaction to science, as well as his perception of a dynamic relationship between nature and self (his lower case "i") amid what he considers the mechanized "anaesthetic" science-worshipping unworld. <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts (double-spaced and titled) and a brief bio.

Conference Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Conference Starts: February 23, 2017
Conference Ends: February 25, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: September 05, 2016

For more information, contact: Gillian Huang-Tiller

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CFP Ed. Coll.: The Critic as Amateur


Saikat Majumdar and I are inviting essays for a proposed collection tentatively titled The Critic as Amateur, with strong interest from Oxford UP. The collection will focus on literary criticism as an activity suspended (productively) between expertise and amateurism. It will explore the idea of the critic of literature as an amateur rather than an expert, or conversely, it will consider the role of expertise in literary criticism. Individual contributions might touch on figures who have written on literature without credentials/certification, academic or otherwise, or institutional affiliations. They might also address academics who have successfully assumed "amateur" roles while writing or speaking in the public domain. Contributors could also address aspects of the history of literary studies and liberal arts education, how both have moved back and forth between the polarities of expertise and amateurism. Finally, contributions can also be personal, even autobiographical takes on the question, one's experience doing different kinds of writing, speaking and teaching. Any kind of archive is welcome here as long as it bears some relation to the unifying motifs of the collection. <br /> <br />If you are interested, please send a proposal/abstract (300-500 words) along with a brief bio to the editors, Aarthi Vadde (aarthi.vadde@duke.edu) or Saikat Majumdar (majumdar@stanford.edu) by August 20, 2016. Following the submission of abstracts, the editors will prepare a detailed proposal which will be reviewed by Oxford UP for the possible contract for the collection. Should OUP issue a contract, a timeline for the submission of complete essays will be set at that time. <br /> <br />Our goal is to bring together scholars of diverse backgrounds, ranks, and affiliations to contribute to the volume. Confirmed contributors so far include: Derek Attridge, Rosinka Chaudhuri, Tom Lutz, Peter McDonald, Melanie Micir, and Joel Nickels. <br />

Conference Location: None, None
Conference Starts: May 24, 2016
Conference Ends: August 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: August 20, 2016

For more information, contact: Aarthi Vadde

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Orphan Identities


Orphan Identities Symposium: Call for Papers <br />Keynote Speakers: Laura Peters and David Floyd <br /> <br />In 1975, Nina Auerbach commented: “Although we are now ‘all orphans,’ alone and free and dispossessed of our past, we yearn for origins, for cultural continuity. In our continual achievement of paradox, we have made of the orphan himself our archetypal and perhaps only ancestor” (1975 p 416). <br />The literary orphan figure occupies a liminal position in culture. Poised on the margins of the family, examining the relationship between the influence of the past and the capacity for self-fashioning in the creation of identity, orphan figures prompt important questions about the relationship between the self, the family and the wider social matrix, and self and other in especial. <br />Forty years on from Auerbach’s influential essay, and in the wake of important new contributions to the debate from Laura Peters and David Floyd (our keynote speakers), it is timely to consider the roles played by literary orphans, and assess the ways in which they reflect and refract the concerns of their contemporaneous cultures. <br />The Orphan Identities symposium will take place at the University of Portsmouth on Saturday November 12th 2016. <br />Topics may include (but are not limited to): <br />fashioning orphan identity; the liminal nature of orphan figures; orphans and transportation/colonial narratives; the orphan as scapegoat; the orphan and modernity; the orphan as dangerous supplement; the therapeutic power of the orphan; the war child/refugee <br /> <br />We are particularly interested in papers that deal with literature post 1800. Abstracts of around 250 words should be sent to: orphan-identities@port.ac.uk by June 10th 2016. <br /> <br />Diane Warren <br />Jennifer Jones <br />Alexandra Gray

Conference Location: Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: November 12, 2016
Conference Ends: November 12, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: June 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Diane Warren, Jennifer Jones, Alex Gray

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Secularization, Religion, and Modernism


Secularization, Religion, and Modernism <br /> <br />This panel explores modernity’s complex and often fraught relationship with secularization, religion, and spiritual experience. Modernity is often described as a period of increasing secularism. This panel questions whether this description suits the period as a whole. <br /> <br />We invite papers that investigate the spiritual climate of modernity. How did modernists position themselves in relation to religion, spirituality, or sacred spaces? In what ways did changing political, economic, or other social forces affect or mitigate the ways in which modernists experience the religious and spiritual? What is the relationship of the modernists to grace? How were modernists seeking forms of community and belonging, both inside and outside the church? <br /> <br />Please send a 250 word abstract, along with a brief scholarly biography, to Victoria Chandler (vec@email.sc.edu) by April 14. <br /> <br /> <br />Conference Location: Pasadena, CA <br />Conference Starts: November 17, 2016 <br />Conference Ends: November 20, 2016 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2016

For more information, contact: Victoria Chandler

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Modernism and Contemporary Cultures of Dissent, Resistance and Protest


Modernism and Contemporary Cultures of Dissent, Resistance, and Protest <br /> <br />This panel seeks proposals that engage with techniques of protest, dissent and/or resistance. While the twenty-first century has already been identified as “the age of resistance,” social scientist Costas Douzinas identifies a theoretical void in the field of resistance studies. Our panel/roundtable aims to contribute to this field and decipher how the material, cultural and philosophical renditions of “resistance” and “dissent” inform modernist social identities. This panel reads the literature of modernism as a particularly vital exemplar of unique forms of protest that remain relevant to the current climate of resistance. <br /> <br />In order to conceptualize modernism’s space in the contemporary culture of dissent as a transnational phenomenon, we invite proposals focused on both the global north and south. We aim to recognize the convergences and divergences of local forms of dissent and how they dialectically interact with each other to form a dialogic culture of resistance on the international stage. We aspire to demonstrate how localized and national literary and social movements, inspired by the political turmoil of the nascent twentieth-century, have informed, and are informed by, a transnational consciousness that has emerged as a global culture of protest today. We will also address how grass-root infra-political subaltern movements interact with both hegemonic discourses of oppression and dominant forms of resistance as they participate in defining the twenty-first century as an age of resistance whose beginnings can be traced, in part, to modernist literary experimentation. <br /> <br />Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the following topics: <br />1. How do we define a culture of resistance? What is the essence of dissent? <br />2. Literary-political movements as cultures of dissent <br />3. Material and ideological dispositions of the cultures of protest <br />4. Forms and functions of subaltern politics as a projection of culture of dissent <br />5. Transnational networks of protest, resistance and dissent <br />6. Modernism as dissent <br />7. Modernist prose and poetry as paradigmatic predecessors of contemporary forms of dissent <br />8. Subaltern modernisms and mass cultures of protest <br /> <br /> <br />Please send 350-500-word abstracts, a short scholarly bio, and technology requirements to bandopad@ualberta.ca and DHengel@gradcenter.cuny.edu by April 14. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena , USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2016

For more information, contact: Daniel Hengel

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Reading that Moves: Modernism, Dance and The Body


This year's MSA 18 Conference theme of "€œCultural Industries" enables an interdisciplinary discussion of literature, the body, movement, and Modernism. Isadora Duncan revolutionized the ways in which the dancing body was presented and moved on the modern stage by “liberating” the body from the discipline and structure of ballet. Traces of this “liberated” body are seen through the works of the literature of the period from the Old Man in Yeats’s The Death of Cuchulain (1939) who "€œwanted a dance"€ but "spit three times on the dancers painted by Degas"€ (27, 37) to the free-spirited Jinny in Woolf's The Waves (1931). This contrast between restrained and liberated bodies permeates throughout Modernist literature, especially in response to the violence and political turmoil of the period. In her important recent monograph, Literature, Modernism, and Dance, Susan Jones writes: "€œthe reciprocal relationship between literature and dance represents one of the most striking but understudied features of modernism"€ (1). With this panel, we hope to build upon Jones'€™s work by incorporating dance into this conversation of cultural industries. How does the body move in modernity? How is the body represented in modernist literature, music, painting, architecture, film, and dance? Topics might include, but are not limited to discussions of: race, gender, sexuality, affect, trauma, ecocriticism, memory, and the shifting concept of public vs. private spheres. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief biography to Panayiota (Patty) Argyrides at 14pa6@queensu.ca by April 13, 2016. (Please note, this is not a guaranteed panel). <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, California, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 13, 2016

For more information, contact: Patty Argyrides

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MSA 18: Pragmatism and Modernism


This proposed panel looks to reconsider the potential relationship between modernism and pragmatism. Following from Lisi Schoenbach€'s _Pragmatic Modernism_ (2012) which argues against the narrative of modernism-as-break by demonstrating a strain of modernist thought committed to gradualism and continuity linked with the pragmatist concept of habit – this panel asks in what other ways modernist and pragmatist thought might be mutually informing, continuous, or otherwise related. Moreover, the panel looks to consider how pragmatism may complicate the division that is still thought to exist between literary modernism in its American, British, and European forms. <br /> <br />Such a panel is especially appropriate given the conference's theme of "Culture Industries." By highlighting the "€œproliferation of cultures in the plural" as among the characteristics that makes southern California the ideal location for this conference, the MSA conference organizers implicitly call to mind a sense of William James' pluralistic universe. What's more, the rhetoric of "new ways of thinking about old distinctions between high and low, serious and popular, [etc.]" intimates the subtitle of James' _Pragmatism_ (i.e. "A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking") while also pragmatically interrogating a set of binaries often associated with modernist studies. That the Frankfurt school has historically been understood to have a vexed relationship with American pragmatism intensifies the relevance of this panel to the conference's thematic framework. <br /> <br />This panel thus invites proposals for individual papers interested in any aspect of the relationship between pragmatism and modernism. Interdisciplinary approaches are welcome. Please email brief abstracts (200-300 words) and bio to Abigail Reardon at abigail.reardon@rutgers.edu by April 12th. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 12, 2016

For more information, contact: Abigail Reardon

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MSA 18: Culture Industry / Cottage Industries


In the waning years of World War II, Adorno and Horkheimer gave a name to their fears of increasing cultural uniformity. It was only in the war's aftermath, however, that it became clear just how prophetic their sense of the "culture industry" would prove. In Britain, for example, Richard Hoggart would bemoan the lingering death of the "full, rich life" of local urban culture in the face of the banalizing forces of "Americanisation" in The Uses of Literacy (1957). The response to this problem, for Hoggart, was to rethink the metropolis not as imperial center, inhabited by a decaying cosmopolitan high culture, but as populous city, as an aggregate of "small worlds, each as homogeneous and well-defined as a village"€“ -- and each able to contribute in its own way to a plural, collective culture. <br /> <br />This proposed panel will explore the significance of Hoggart'€™s gesture considered more broadly (though contributors need not engage with Hoggart himself). Faced at once with the decline of Anglo-modernism and the dissolution of empire, stable understandings of British culture became unmoored. Rather than imagine a vacuum into which American mass culture could pour unhindered, this panel asks another set of questions. What happens if we look not at the culture industry, nor at the "high" culture it was ostensibly replacing, but at what was occurring between and below them, just out of view? At a network of cottage industries, so to speak, working alongside one another (though not necessarily in full awareness of one another) to produce something new? <br /> <br />This panel is therefore interested in what happens if we return to the scene of mid-century Britain searching not only for signs of what Genevieve Abravanel has termed "Britain€'s invention of the American Age," but for examples of cultural continuity and innovation alike occurring at more local levels. The panel especially welcomes papers considering immigrant and regional literatures across the early and mid-century; late and hybrid modernisms; the shifting contours of "high" and "popular" arts; Mass-Observation and the origins of Cultural Studies; and so on. Interdisciplinary approaches are welcome. <br /> <br />Please email abstracts (250-300 words) and a brief scholarly bio to Ian Bignall (ian.bignall@rutgers.edu) by April 12th.

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 12, 2016

For more information, contact: Ian Bignall

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MSA 18: Slowing Down Modernism


MSA 18: Slowing Down Modernism <br /> <br />Cfp MSA 18 / Pasadena, CA / 17-20 November 2016 <br /> <br />The emergence and proliferation of new media technologies around the turn of the century (mass print, film, broadcasting) altered the speed, urgency and scale of cultural production. This was reflected in the literature produced at the time, which became obsessed with technology and velocity, with ‘the new!’ and ‘the now!’ Yet alternative temporalities in a period David Trotter describes as the First Media Age by and large remain uncharted terrain. This panel is interested in a modernism that resists ideas of velocity and urgency in both its aesthetics and its modes of production. Slowness is modernism’s antidote. While Beckett is a prime suspect in a discussion of the unhurried pace and rhythm of modernist writing, the panel also hopes to zero in on less canonical texts and contexts. In what ways, for instance, did long bouts of inactivity in the trenches affect the writing of soldiers in World War One? How did banality and boredom inform cultural production? Which processes were involved in the translation of ideas or the circulation of periodicals on the outskirts of Empire? How does modernist experimentation with language, especially stream of consciousness, play with different rhythms? Which techniques, ranging from the handwritten periodical to Nancy Cunard’s use of an antique printing press, counterintuitively persisted in the 20th century? Taking its cue from the work of Miller (2013) and Majumdar (2013), this panel places slowness at the heart of the modern artistic project. In doing so it aims to consider complementary narratives that see modernism as a mode whose emergence, aesthetics and production were less fast-paced and immediately revolutionary than is often thought. <br /> <br />This panel is interested in contributions on the idea of slowness in relation to the modernist aesthetic and newly emerging media and technologies; in slowness and affect (boredom, waiting, endurance); in slowness and the periodical press (“slow print”); in slowness and form (the long novel, the encyclopaedic); in slowness and history (protracted revolutions, permanent warfare); in the development of modernism (progress v. stasis); in deep time, killing time and modernist conceptions of timelessness; and, more generally, in temporalities that challenge the rapidly modernizing, fast-paced nature of early-20th-century life. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words and a short scholarly bio to cedric.vandijck@ugent.be by 10 April 2016. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 11, 2016

For more information, contact: Cedric Van Dijck

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MSA 18: Scenes of Desire: Fantasy and Female Pleasure in Transatlantic Print Media and Silent Cinema


Recent feminist scholarly interventions in the new modernist studies have begun to focus critical attention on women's popular culture and its explorations of fantasy and female pleasure. Bestselling novels, magazines, and other forms of print media created by and for women have an oblique and ambiguous relationship to modernism; yet they form a rich resource for the analysis of gender and sexuality in the transformative contexts of modernity. Likewise, silent cinema presents an invaluable opportunity to explore cultural texts that foreground women's experience, whether as writers, directors, stars, or fans. This panel proposes to explore the representation of fantasy, desire, and pleasure in women's popular cultural texts of the 1920s, with particular attention to fantasy as "not the object of desire, but its setting" (Jean Laplanche and Jean-Bertrand Pontalis, "Fantasy and the Origins of Sexuality," 27.) How do media texts of the 1920s foreground the scenic quality of desire in print and visual modes? And how is fantasy connected to a consumer culture oriented around glamour, display, and female pleasure? <br /> <br />Topics might include the print and cinematic works of women writers such as Ethel M. Dell, Elinor Glyn, E. M. Hull, Anita Loos, and Olive Higgins Prouty, among others; the role played by female directors in Hollywood and global silent cinema; women's participation in emergent star discourses and fan cultures; and consumer culture, particularly in the form of tie-ins, marketing, and advertising to women as readers and audience members. <br /> <br />This panel, if accepted, would be linked to the "Dream Factories" special stream at MSA 18. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 350-500 words and a brief bio to Lise Shapiro Sanders at lsanders@hampshire.edu by April 10, 2016. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session). <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Lise Shapiro Sanders

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MSA 18: The Politics of Compartmentalization


The opening lines of Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer’s chapter, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Culture,” identify capitalism’s ubiquity not only through film, television, and advertising images, but also through the concrete structure of the urban environment. “Gleaming towers” reveal a move towards “unleashed entrepreneurial systems.” The flimsy construction of suburban bungalows forecasts that they will soon be discarded “like empty food cans,” while the city housing projects “designed to perpetuate the individual as a supposedly independent unit in a small hygienic dwelling make him all the more subservient to his adversary—the absolute power of capitalism.” This latter description, in particular, announces the failure of a Corbusien model of urban planning and instead accuses the “independent unit” of subjecting individuals to further regulation of their bodies and behaviors, of creating a compartmentalized isolation that forecloses community, and of more firmly entrenching a commodity-driven value system that maintains capitalism’s uneven power structures. <br /> <br />Horkheimer and Adorno’s brief discussion of the compartmentalized dwelling bears the traces of Kracauer, Benjamin, and Simmel but more generally, its mode of critique also resonates with modernism’s broader interest in the possibilities of space—its capacity to resist or reinscribe capitalism. Particularly, notions of physical compartmentalization, the “individual unit,” and its political, mental, and aesthetic consequences, undergird many seemingly disparate modernist projects. The twentieth-century resurgence of the Romantic ideal of the artist’s studio as space that insulated the artist from the outside world provided Abstract Expressionists with a model for artistic activity that turned inward as an implicit rejection of Cold-war capitalism. In Anzia Yezierska’s collection, How I Found America, the tenement’s failure to properly compartmentalize its residents from one another often produces a sense of community amongst working-class neighbors, who eventually band together and unionize. Finally, Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí’s Un Chien Andalou visually produces experiences of the uncanny and subverts capitalist rationality precisely by suggesting and then violating the parameters of the living space as a container, impossibly allowing Paris apartment doors to serve as portals to a seaside retreat. <br /> <br />This panel, then, seeks papers that address the intersection of compartmentalized space, aesthetics, and political critique in a range of modernist media. How are compartmentalized spaces manipulated or mobilized in modernist aesthetics and to what end? How are ideas of community, privacy, or invasion routed through representations of these spaces and what are the aesthetic and/or political consequences of these? How do notions of class dovetail with the idea of compartmentalized space? Are there aesthetic methods that specifically endorse or resist the ideal of enclosure? How do representations of compartmentalize space seek to revise art and the artist’s relationship to capitalist modes of production? How can discussions of the compartmentalized space be used to focalize capitalism’s uneven consequences for men and women, for male and female artists? <br /> <br />Please send 200-word abstracts, a short scholarly bio, and technology requirements to algreen@msu.edu by 4/10. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Anna Green

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MSA 18: Listening in/to Modernist Texts


In his 1938 essay, "On the Fetish Character in Music and the Regression of Listening,"€ Adorno theorizes how modernity€'s emphasis on mass consumption dramatically altered listening practices, promoting what he termed "regressive listening." For him, the modern listener's passive receptivity to all music, regardless of quality or originality, detracted from his or her ability to engage in concentrated, discerning audition. This passive consumption of acoustic texts was encouraged by advances in sound reproduction technologies such as the radio. As Steven Connor explains in Beckett, Modernism and the Material Imagination, "€œ[R]adio provided more and more of an environment in which to live, and sank more and more into the background, while listening became correspondingly less focused, more peripheral, more compounded with other things" (68). Many twentieth-century texts can be read as responding to the changing acoustic climate and its new demands on the modern listener. While historically much scholarship has approached literary modernism as privileging the visual, recent critical work by Connor, Melba Cuddy-Keane, Jane A. Lewty, Dee Morris, David Nowell Smith, Garrett Stewart, David Trotter, and others has gone a long way in recovering the phonic subtexts of modernist literature. <br /> <br />This proposed panel seeks to extend the works of these scholars by further considering how modernist artists and writers engaged with changes in listening practices and cultures. What kind of listening is invited or required by modernist texts? Does modernist literature allow for, or even embrace, regressive listening, work against it, or challenge this concept? How did sound reproduction technologies influence the development of the modernist phonotext? How does twentieth-century literature use the written word to recreate the modern soundscape? <br /> <br />Topics might include, but are by no means limited to, the following: <br />- Modernist soundscapes <br />- Representations of listening in modernist literature <br />- The influence of sound reproduction technologies on modernist literature <br />- The voice/Voice in modernist literature <br />- Silent reading, subvocalization, and literary "€œearplay" <br />- Prosody in prose and poetry <br />- Deafness and/in modernist literature <br />- Sound vs. noise in modernist literature <br />- Radio plays and other acoustic texts <br />- Recorded literature <br />- Listening and mass consumption <br />- Gendered listening practices <br /> <br />Submit 300-word abstracts and 1-page CV to Jennifer Janechek (jennifer-yirinec@uiowa.edu) by April 10, 2016. (Please note that this is not a guaranteed panel.)

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Jennifer Janechek

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MSA 18: Modernist Whitman


This proposed panel for MSA 18 will explore the ways in which modernist poets, critics, and academics reacted to and against Walt Whitman, constructing complicated literary historical and social legacies. From Ezra Pound's begrudging acknowledgment that Whitman "broke the new wood" to Amy Lowell's assertion that "€œWhitman fell into his own peculiar form through ignorance"€ to Michael Gold's claim that Whitman was "€œAmerica's first proletariat poet,"€ Whitman was at the heart of debates about what constituted modern poetic form and modern social identities. This panel seeks to interrogate the ways in which cultural workers in the modernist era used the figure of Whitman to construct usable pasts, poetic futures, and imagined communities. <br /> <br />Topics may include Whitman's relation to: <br />Modernist prosody <br />Literary histories and poetic traditions <br />Social sciences <br />Political movements <br />Political rhetoric <br />Narratives of national and international progress <br />The modern university <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250-500 words to Erin Kappeler (erin.joyce.kappeler@gmail.com) or Timothy Robbins (timothy.robbins@graceland.edu) by April 10. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session.)

Conference Location: Pasadena,CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Erin Kappeler

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MSA 18: Alternative Culture Industries


Raymond Williams, in his Sociology of Culture, articulates a model of cultural production that operates outside the culture industry as monolithic institutional force. Distinguishing between institutions and what he calls formations, Williams argues, “is a working distinction, to make possible some variety of approach to the question of the effective social relations of culture” (“Institutions” 35). This quote proves suggestive for exploring and theorizing possible alternative cultural industries, outside the authoring institutions of the publishing firm and the university, which played a central role in the early construction of modernism. As modernist hostess Mabel Dodge described the year 1913, “There were all sorts of new ways to communicate as well as new communications” (Movers and Shakers 39). <br /> <br />This panel calls for papers that articulate, trace, and theorize these alternative forms of communication as sites of cultural production: the salons, political parties, enclaves, meetings, collaborations, little magazines, or other forms of cultural production that operated outside the culture industry even as it came to reify modernism as an art. Questions we hope to answer: how might we theorize “practice” as a form of cultural institution? How might social networks produce culture? What alternatives to book production can we discover in the development or dissemination of modernism? What can interdisciplinary approaches reveal about the cultural development of modernism? Please email brief abstracts (300-400 words) and bio to Dr. Matthew Hannah at mhannah@uoregon.edu by April 10th. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, U.S.A
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Matthew Hannah

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MSA18: Caribbean Modernisms


Caribbean Modernisms <br /> <br />This proposed panel explores how attending to the Caribbean can further expand our understanding of modernism as a transnational phenomenon. More than just a material and imagined setting that influenced modernist literary production, the Caribbean was itself a site of modernity. While scholars frequently discusses Caribbean writers and intellectuals like Jean Rhys, Claude McKay, Frantz Fanon, C.L.R. James and Marcus Garvey, they are often subsumed under larger rubric of Harlem Renaissance studies or Anglo-American modernism; there has been less scholarship that examines these writers as modernist, Caribbean writers. This panel seeks to bring the fields of modernist studies and Caribbean studies together in order to examine the Caribbean as a site of literary modernism. <br /> <br />This panel invites proposals on Caribbean modernists, Anglo-American and African-American modernists in the Caribbean, or modernist writing set in the Caribbean. Proposals might address the following questions: <br /> What does it mean for modernist stories to take place in the Caribbean? <br /> How does the Caribbean function in the modernist imaginary? <br /> How do the categories of “modernism” and “Caribbean”—both of which have been densely theorized—speak to one another? <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-300 word CFP and short bio to Kelly Hanson (hansonkr@indiana.edu) by April 10, 2016.

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 21, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Kelly Hanson

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MSA 18: Signs for Wonders: Modern Enchantments and Disenchantments


Are there peculiarly modern ways of wondering, or of failing to wonder? Are modern life and its culture industries afflicted by disenchantment (Max Weber), are they vibrant with enchantment (Jane Bennett), or are they ironic with disenchanted enchantment (Michael Saler)? What kind of affect is wonder, or what kind of cognitive process, and how is it read? What have modernist writers and artists done with, or done to wonder, awe, and fascination, and to what ends? How do these practices converge or diverge from the spellbinding work of modern entertainment and other media? What are the implications for wondrous horror versus pleasure, knowledge versus stupefaction, empowerment versus paralysis? This proposed panel seeks papers from diverse disciplines on the production of magic, enchantment or wonder (Jane Bennett, Sophia Vasalou, Mary-Jane Rubenstein) and literature, arts, and media. <br /> <br />Send 200-300 word proposals with brief professional biographical notes to Glenn Willmott at gw12@queensu.ca. Due April 8, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 08, 2016

For more information, contact: Glenn Willmott

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MSA 18: &quot;Genre-Art and Resistance: Mass Culture and Leftist Modernisms&quot;


Genre-Art and Resistance: Mass Culture and Leftist Modernisms <br />Organizer: Eric Keenaghan (University at Albany, SUNY) <br />MSA 18 Pasadena, CA <br /> <br /> In their famous “Culture Industry” essay, Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer complain that mass culture (here talkies, specifically) “leaves no room for imagination or reflection on the part of the audience, who is unable to respond within the structure of the film, yet deviate from its precise detail without losing the thread of the story; hence the film forces its victims to equate it directly with reality.” Mass cultural products embody the “most rigid of all styles,” which seemingly suffers a “lack of style.” If the spontaneous response or reflective distance of audience members is disallowed, then the culture industry, especially in wartime Europe and the United States, impedes political consciousness and thus inhibits active resistance. Genre-work, lacking style and thinking and imagination, is supposedly the mediocre stuff of popular complacency. <br /> Modernist scholars have challenged the suppositions such as Adorno and Horkheimer’s that avant-garde or high modernist experiment and formalism are ipso facto modes of aesthetic resistance. Critics have recuperated vernacular cultural forms and commodity culture to explore how they have informed modernist style, often with an eye toward ideological critique and sometimes social or ethical transformation. Many leftist-identified artists also drew on popular forms to develop not just identity- or class-based forms of political consciousness but also national, transnational, and cosmopolitan consciousnesses. Indeed, mass culture opened spaces in the guise of generic forms—potboilers, historical romances, and espionage film—and “serious” artists, working under noms de plumes or under their artworld and activist names, exploited these forms and worked in culture industries for the purposes of cultivating resistant popular readerships, sometimes even earning income in the process. <br /> Presenters are sought for this proposed panel or roundtable (format TBD) to explore how modernist authors and artists have worked within culture industries and with its forms, rather than against them, in their development of politically leftist and other progressive projects challenging liberalist complacencies, conservative cultural and political retrogression, and/or totalitarian and fascist authoritarianism. Possible papers might include (but are not limited to) accounts of leftist and progressive authors and artists who actually worked in Western culture industries, studies of authors and artists who appropriated culture industry forms in their own experimental modes, or politically and aesthetically informed theoretic examinations of early to mid-twentieth century popular cultural forms and the cultivation of consciousness, imagination, or understanding. Strongest consideration will be given to proposals tying their subjects to considerations extending beyond author or text-specific studies. Papers that address transnational or planetary approaches to modernist studies and political literatures are also desired. <br /> Please submit abstracts (between 200 and 300 words), along with a brief c.v., to Eric Keenaghan (ekeenaghan@albany.edu) by Friday April 8. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 08, 2016

For more information, contact: Eric Keenaghan

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MSA 18: Likeliness and Probability


The philosopher Ian Hacking described probability as "the success story of the first half of the twentieth century."€ The poet Elizabeth Bishop, in "€œIn the Waiting Room,"€ draws on the language of probability when her young speaker thinks, "€œHow --€“ I didn'€™t know any/word for it --€“ how '€˜unlikely.'" And in James Joyce'€™s Ulysses, Bloom identifies "€œthat flying around" as a "€œbat probably,"€ which "very likely"€ lives in the belfry. <br /> <br />Modernism has been described as shocking, and shock is the result of an encounter with newness that claims to overturn previously held truths or even epistemological methodologies. But what happens when the new is unexpected but not shocking, when it does not undermine or overthrow truths but can be incorporated and assimilated into them? How does probability, a prominent modern epistemological methodology, take shape in modernist literature? And how does probability, with its foundations in mathematical logic, agree with and diverge from the more approximate likely, with its roots in likeness, the engine of metaphor? <br /> <br />This panel will discuss modernism'€™s accounts of the likely and the unlikely, and how modernist texts theorize making sense of an unpredictable world through weighing and evaluating probability. Likeliness substitutes in for lack -- when one doesn'€™t "know any/word for it"€ or when one is unsure what exactly is flying overhead --€“ but it can never be a perfect fit, never actually certain, always, at best, only probable. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250 words and a brief biography by April 8th to Johanna Winant (jwinant@emory.edu). <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 08, 2016

For more information, contact: Johanna Winant

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MSA 18: Dissent, Incorporated


This year'™s MSA conference theme of "Culture Industries" provides an opportunity to interrogate again and anew how the university, as a complex cultural and economic formation, structures discourses about poetics--especially practices that are described as "political," "revolutionary," or "oppositional." This panel or roundtable (format TBD) seeks to examine rigorously the relationships among academic institutions, poetics, and movements for economic and social justice. While we are interested in exploring the institutional forces that have determined, and thus incorporated, certain understandings of "political poetry," we also seek to identify critical and poetic practices that, to borrow a formulation from Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, take place in the university but are not of it. We are interested in papers that put pressure on analytic and evaluative terms ("experimental," "political," "leftist," "avant-garde," etc.) as well as those that address questions such as: <br /> <br />How do recent meditations on the university such as Fred Moten and Stefano Harney'™s _The Undercommons_ and Piya Chatterjee and Sunaina Maira's _The Imperial University: Academic Repression and Scholarly Dissent_ provide new perspectives on contemporary poetics, especially the way we define political and aesthetic avant-gardes? <br /> <br />What is the relationship of poetry to political activism? How do poetries growing out of recent political movements (Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, BDS, Idle No More) call our attention to the interpretive practices and values that have been ingrained in our current disciplinary structures? <br /> <br />How have contemporary poets addressed the structural economic inequalities perpetuated by the university itself (adjunct and graduate student labor, student debt)? How have they addressed the racial injustices perpetuated by current institutional and disciplinary structures? <br /> <br />How do extra-institutional organizing efforts (including community workshops, reading groups, and performance spaces) work in relation and/or resistance to academic institutions? <br /> <br />How might innovative/radical pedagogies proffer effective challenges to the neoliberal university? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief bio to Sarah Ehlers at sehlers@uh.edu by April 8, 2016. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session.)

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 08, 2016

For more information, contact: Sarah Ehlers

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MSA 18: Modernity as a Culture of Environmental Risk


CFP for MSA 18: Nov. 17-20, 2016, Pasadena, California <br /> <br />In his 1992 work Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity, Ulrich Beck argues that "€œin advanced modernity, society with all its subsystems of the economy, politics, cultures and the family can no longer be understood as autonomous of nature. Environmental problems are not problems of our surroundings, but in their origins and through their consequences€“ are thoroughly social problems, problems of people" (Beck). While the idea of environmental damage resulting from human action has of course gained credence since Beck'€™s original publication, ecocritics have yet to explore fully what a sociological approach to environmental problems means for the field of environmental literature. While it is beyond well established that human action has dramatically shaped the natural world, the ways in which the natural world shaped the course of modernity are still being determined. Understanding that modernity and ecological fallout are perpetually intertwined challenges not only the traditional interpretations of nature writing/environmental literature, but also traditional notions of the relationship between nature and culture under modernization. Accepting the premise that modernity has created a culture of ecological or environmental risk, ecocritics now must grapple with how this risk culture affects the interpretation and production of texts about the natural world. <br /> <br />This panel invites proposals for individual papers interested in the relationship between modernity and ecological risk or modernity and natural disaster, the impact of modernization on constructions of nature, and the broad relationship between modernity and the environment. Please send abstracts no longer than 250 words to Rachel Carr at rmca222@g.uky.edu no later than April 5th. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, California , USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2016

For more information, contact: Rachel Carr

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MSA 18: Modernism in an Age of Transpacific Reproduction


This panel invites papers that redefine modernist strategies, gestures, performances, objects, texts, and archives by situating them in and across the Pacific. More than a spatial or geopolitical category, transpacific networks have become concentrations of feminized and racially-marked labor under global capitalism. <br /> <br />How might this shift in the frame of analysis speak to recent critical work on the relationships between aesthetic modernism, labor, and capital? What political solidarities or antagonisms can be traced in and beyond the Pacific? What—in the exploding modernist archive—might be historically, aesthetically, formally, and theoretically specific to the transpacific imaginary? How might modernist aesthetics repeat, resist, or even transform existing forms of transpacific re/productive labor? And how might the transpacific be imagined differently outside of labor networks? Papers addressing these and other questions (including comparative work) are warmly welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a CV and abstract (300 words) to Tze-Yin Teo (tteo2@uoregon.edu) by 5 April.

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2016

For more information, contact: Tze-Yin Teo

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MSA 18: The Splendor of the Real: Disrupting The Narrative Agency of Modernism


Neither Mind nor Matter, or The Splendor of the Real: Disrupting The Narrative Agency of Modernism <br /> <br />Modernism, insisted Adorno, is "not a chronological, but a qualitative category." As a tribute to Adorno's role in diffusing Modernism, this panel seeks to renew the provocation of the philosopher's saying. This dictum puts forth the unorthodox view that the specificity of modernism cannot be successfully captured either in terms of aesthetic devices or historical belongings. This panel solicits papers that respond to the challenge of the qualitative re-definition of Modernism after Adorno, especially in relation to the category of the Real. <br /> <br />It is typical of the modernist texts to create epistemic tensions and aesthetic effects resistant to formal, historicist or psychological vocabularies. In particular, we might see some modernist prose as subverting the categories of the mind (mimesis of inwardness) or matter (investment into the obdurate objecthood of things). <br /> <br />But we might also register, in certain modernist texts, a drive to enact a more estranged notion of the Real, one that could also be termed the "Inaccessible." Panelists are therefore invited to consider the tangled topology of such resistances and put forth new concepts for marking them. The goal of the panel is to estrange the canonical concept of ostranenie by reactivating the modernist passion for denoting the Real. <br /> <br />To bring into relief the disruptions Modernism brings to the industry of culture, the panelists may choose to explore the following questions: <br /> <br />* The Names of the Real: How does the category of the Real (as elaborated in the work of Alexandre Koyre, Jacques Lacan and Jean-Claude Milner) affect our understanding of modernist narrative? What other names, in addition to the "Inaccessible," can one give to the Real in the context of modernism? <br /> <br />* The Uses of the Unintelligible: What critical concept should we use to elucidate the resistance of modernist syntax to stylistic, psychological or rhetorical capture? Can the innovations of Deleuze, Lyotard, Ranciere, Serres, Badiou and Latour help us in this regard? <br /> <br />* Triple Negation: In what ways do modernist texts entrap the Cartesian cogito? How do they embarrass the worship of Nature? When do they undercut the reproducibility of Culture? <br /> <br />* Altered States, or the New Adventures of the Transcendental-Empirical "Doublet"(Foucault): What altered experiences of time and space emerge from the encounter with the modernist Real? <br /> <br />* Inherent Virtue: What pedagogical potential, if any, can be detected today in the extravagant textures of modernism? <br /> <br />In addition to investigations of modernist prose, the panel will also welcome submissions examining the intimations of the inaccessible, yet all-too-present Real in non-linguistic media, especially sculpture, painting and music. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 500 words and a short scholarly bio to ogelikman@soka.edu by 5 April 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2016

For more information, contact: Oleg Gelikman

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Editing Modernism/Modernist Editing


CFP: Editing Modernism/Modernist Editing <br /> <br />We are seeking papers for ‘Editing Modernism/Modernist Editing’, a one-day conference to be held at Edinburgh Napier University (Merchiston Campus) on Friday the 13th of May 2016. The conference invites scholars to share their research about and methodologies for textual editing of modernist literature. ‘Textual editing’ broadly refers to developments in the traditional research and practices involved in discovering, contextualizing, and preparing literary works for publication, for both scholarly and other readers. However, it also concerns problems and methods inherent to the production and dissemination of modernist digital editions and digital archives. We welcome proposals in any area of modernist scholarship that engages with ‘editing’, the archive, and editorial practice. <br /> <br />This conference will speak to the recent resurgence in interest in the modernist text as editorial object and the various platforms through which readers encounter modernist text. In modernist studies, several large-scale editorial projects are currently underway, including the Dorothy Richardson and the Wyndham Lewis Editions projects, and last year saw the Complete Prose of T.S. Eliot: Vol. II win the Modernist Studies Association book prize. These are paralleled in recent digital archives and editions such as the Modernist Versions Project and Infinite Ulysses. The question of how contemporary editorial practice can draw on modernist practice is of keen interest, as textual editing was often a key self-reflexive concern for modernist authors, many of whom were publishers and editors themselves. From the collaborative editorial practices that underpinned such works as T.S Eliot’s The Waste Land and Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood to the production of modernist little magazines, innovative modernist editorial practices continue to interest scholars as they take on the role of contemporary editors to texts such as these. <br /> <br />The conference will feature a selection of panel papers; a roundtable discussion joined by Dr Bryony Randall (University of Glasgow), Dr Jason Harding (Durham University), and another guest TBC; and two keynote speakers: <br /> <br />Professor Scott McCracken (Keele University) will present a talk about the scholarly edition as cultural production. Prof McCracken is the Principal Investigator for the Richardson Editions Project, which is funded by the AHRC and which is leading to the publication of scholarly editions of Richardson’s 13-volume Pilgrimage with Oxford University Press. <br /> <br />Dr Nathan Waddell (University of Nottingham) will present a talk titled ‘Problems, Possibilities, Polemics: Taking the Arrows of Wyndham Lewis’. Dr Waddell is on the Editorial Board of the Oxford University Press Complete Edition of Wyndham Lewis’s fiction and non-fiction. <br /> <br />For panel paper consideration, please submit a 200-word abstract and brief biography to Tara Thomson at t.thomson2@napier.ac.uk by the 1st of April. <br /> <br />The day’s programme will be followed by a wine reception. Registration will be limited, so we ask that all participants register in advance at http://editingmodernism.eventbrite.co.uk. <br /> <br />Please send any inquiries to Tara Thomson at t.thomson2@napier.ac.uk. <br />

Conference Location: Edinburgh, UK
Conference Starts: May 13, 2016
Conference Ends: May 13, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Tara Thomson

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MSA 18: Vital Evidence: Speculative Realism and the Modernist Clue


In his seminal mystery, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," Edgar Allan Poe writes "[t]he ingenious are always fanciful and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic," establishing from the beginning a relationship between fancy and reason, mystery and solution, that continues to define the genre to this day. This panel seeks to examine the clue as a loci of this - sometimes uneasy, sometimes symbiotic - relationship, particularly in the moment of upheaval that modernism marks for the genre. In investigative fictions by authors as varied as Gertrude Stein, Henry James, and Dashiell Hammett (and filmmakers such as Fritz Lang, Orson Welles, and Alfred Hitchcock), the clue, as a material trace of a crime, is always necessary but never sufficient. Despite its place as the foundation of investigative reason, mystery pervades the clue. At once a thing, object, signifier, sign, and metonym, the clue is a wildly unstable entity, crisscrossed by discursive lines and epistemic strategies that struggle to make it mean. Operating in a literary context that prized brevity, allusion, and implication, modernist mystery writers were uniquely positioned to face the clue's undecidability. <br /> <br />In this way, modernist mystery writing has an important affinity with recently developed approaches to materialist philosophy broadly categorized as Speculative Realism. Some materialists have argued for the object's strangeness, its alien qualities, and resistance to easy categorization. The Object Oriented Ontology (OOO) of Graham Harman, for example, emphasizes the inexorably "withdrawn" status of an object, its inability to fully reveal itself to an observer. Other writers after Harman have likewise emphasized the object's strangeness, its tendency to resist or even defy investigation. Some, like Jane Bennet, have argued for a form of vitalism, deploying it as an epistemological tactic in the face of the unknown. What links these cases is a pragmatic concern for the manner in which an object can be a locus of knowledge, of the unknown, and of occlusion. Given, then, that the clue is an object harnessed for its narrative power, how does Modernism's turn toward matters of interiority and exteriority allow us new ways to think through the clue as object and trope within mystery's broader formulae? <br /> <br />Papers will focus on this relationship between the clue and the object in modernist crime fiction, or in writing that can be productively read through the lens thereof. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of about 300 words and a brief bio to Jeremy Colangelo at jcolang2@uwo.ca or Thomas Stuart at tstuart9@uwo.ca by April 1. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session). <br /> <br />Papers might consider: <br /> <br />- The place of the clue in the contest between high modernist fiction and the period's genre fiction <br /> <br />- The clue as a locus of the period's paranoia and paranoid fantasies <br /> <br />- The unpredictability of the clue in relation to modernist epiphany <br /> <br />- Links between the clue's materialism and the performances of masculinity that define modernist mystery fiction <br /> <br />- Modernist texts that move beyond or work on the limits of the formulaic, material clue <br /> <br />- The clue's place in modernism's interest in involuntary memory and the Proustian moment <br /> <br />- The clue's translatability as a narratological object; the recuperation or reinvention by non-English authors of a genre originally defined by British and American writers <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, U.S.A.
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Jeremy Colangelo

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MSA 18: Outsider Modernisms


In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce writes that artists must defend themselves with the use of “silence, exile, and cunning” (181) – for Joyce, the artist must become an outsider. Indeed, the outsider was often a privileged figure in the modernist period, and twentieth-century advancements in technology, industry and communication broadened artistic boundaries, encouraging migrations and expatriations as well as a vast array of alternative influences from different temporal and spatial sources, all of which permitted artists to remove themselves and view their homes from afar. In a milieu that emphasizes the benefits of exile and broad networks of influence, the concepts of the outsider and the mainstream both take on shifts in meaning. <br /> <br />This panel investigates the concept of exile and the figure of the modernist outsider in light of these rapidly expanding boundaries and next to assumptions about established modernisms. How is the concept of the outsider developed within a movement in a movement that already values an apparently outside perspective, and in a culture where boundaries of travel and communication are being continually broken down? What kinds of networks and communities are available to outsiders, and what kinds of networks and communities do they form? To what alternative lines of influence do outsiders claim lineage, and how might they re-interpret established lines of influence? How might paying attention to outsider modernisms re-form or re-interrogate assumptions about industries of High Modernism? How does the outsider play into theories of modernist creativity, and how do modernist artists represent outsiders in their work? <br /> <br />Paper topics might include, but are not limited to: <br /> -Modernist and alternative modernist networks, industries, and influences <br />- Alternative theories of modernism <br />- Transnational modernisms <br />- Broadening or alienating technological advances in modernism <br />- Expatriate modernisms in conversation with domestic modernisms <br />- Otherness and modernism <br />- Under-recognized forms and authors of modernism (e.g. women, minority ethnic groups, postcolonial writers, etc.) <br />- Life-writing of expatriates, travelers, immigrants during the modernist period <br />- The figure of the outsider in modernist literature and culture <br />- The relationship between creativity and alienation <br />- The outsider, celebrity, and self-promotion <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement to Dancy Mason (dancy.mason@mail.mcgill.ca) by April 1st, 2016. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Dancy Mason

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MSA 18: Life/Writing: Biography, Autobiography, Diary


Life/Writing: Biography, Autobiography, Diary <br /> <br />Seeking two papers, one on biography, and one on autobiography (and/or memoir), to join a third on diary. This panel would aim to bring into dialogue emerging perspectives on the nature and status of these three genres of life writing in the modernist era. While recognizing the instability of generic boundaries, and the many hybrid forms of modernist life writing, the panel would seek to examine relatively distinct instances of biography, autobiography, and diary in order to elucidate how the different generic frameworks may shape writers’ approaches to issues such as the following: <br /> <br />- conceptions of self and/or character <br />- shifting boundaries of private and public life <br />- obscurity, celebrity, scandal <br />- exposure, gossip, confession <br />- everyday life and hierarchies of narrative significance <br />- the auto/biographical “contract”: implicit and explicit claims to truth or factuality <br />- “reality hunger”: the attraction and marketability of “true” stories <br />- memory, history, preservation <br /> <br />Proposals of 250-300 words and brief bio to e.ophir@usask.ca by April 1. <br />(This is not a guaranteed session.) <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Ella Ophir

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Beckett, Badiou, and Adorno


This panel has two related aims: <br /> <br />1) To present new readings of Beckett through the lens of Adorno and/or Badiou <br /> <br />2) To juxtapose Adorno and Badiou’s reading of Beckett in order to show how each illuminates ethical and political shortcomings in the other <br /> <br />Please send a 250-500 word abstract to charlessumner@hotmail.com by April 1. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Charles Sumner

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Global Sociality and Modernist Poetics (Modernist Studies Association/ MSA 18/ 17-20 November, Pasadena, CA, USA)


CFP: Global Sociality and Modernist Poetics (Modernist Studies Association/MSA 18/17-20 November, Pasadena, CA, USA) <br /> <br />Recently, Anthony Reed has described the "paradigmatic gesture of the lyric mode" as "claiming the solidity of presence through the act of offering it to another." This panel seeks to examine the relation between modernist poetry and sociality in a global frame. Modernist poetry provides a counter-discourse for globalization, one which critiques representations of the global while at the same time creating a repertoire of intersubjectivities, offerings, and alliances. Questions include: How do modernist poems provide a fresh conceptual vocabulary for global solidarity, intersectionality, cohabitaion, or adjacency? How might modernist poetics register affects of colonialism, of "feeling global" (Robbins), or of a world system? How might a global modernist poetics use or revise different versions of network theory? How might we re-read poetic form as illuminating or participating in the histories of collective struggle and the formation of a revolutionary consciousness? <br /> <br />Please send a paper abstract of 250 words and a two-sentence bio to Walt Hunter (hunter1@clemson.edu) and Siobhan Phillips (phillisi@dickinson.edu) by 1 April. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Walt Hunter and Siobhan Phillips

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MSA 18: Modernism and Failure


Inspired by examples such as Samuel Beckett’s injunction in Westward Ho to “fail better," Gertrude Stein’s inability to complete her “history of the whole world” in The Making of Americans, and Ezra Pound’s lament in "Canto CXVI" that he could not “make it cohere,” this panel seeks papers exploring the relationship between modernism and failure. In their varied and frequent embraces of utopian politics, incomplete narratives, and pure abstraction, many modernist writers and artists engaged in a wide range of aesthetic and political projects doomed to fail, while others embraced failure as a means of escaping the progressive, normative, or otherwise limiting aesthetic, political, and cultural models they inherited. <br />  <br />Panelists are invited to consider the various ways in which failure inspires or undermines modernist art and literature. Topics may include, but are not limited to: the futility of modernism's totalizing ambitions, as found in a number of twentieth-century revivals of the epic; the role of unfinished, or unfinishable, projects in modernist studies; thwarted utopian politics; failed promises to escape history or nature; the inability to overcome aesthetic traditions, or inherited gender, racial, or class-based identities; and the role of failure in shaping alternative identities. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of 250-300 words and a brief bio by April 1 to Stephen Pasqualina (spasqual@usc.edu).

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Stephen Pasqualina

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MSA 18: Modernism and the Language of Enlightenment


Modernism and the Language of Enlightenment <br /> <br />Proposed panel for MSA 18 (November 17-20; Pasadena, CA) <br /> <br />Adorno and Horkheimer'€™s account of mass culture as a product of the "enlightenment"€ tendency toward order and conformity is well known and widely influential, and important work by Andreas Huyssen, Michael North, Mark Wollaeger, Nancy Bentley, and others has convincingly established the depth of modernism's association with mass culture. In light of such contributions to the project of historicizing modernist aesthetics, this panel proposes to refocus our attentions on the particular conception of language that Adorno and Horkheimer outline in Dialectic of Enlightenment. According to the authors'€™ account, "€œthe distinction between word and object was unknown"€ in the world of myth (Jephcott translation), but Enlightenment thought alters this linguistic situation; the authors point to Odysseus'€™ misrepresentation of his identity to Polyphemus as a pivotal moment that severs the essential unity of word and thing. Under this "demythologizing of language,"€ the word "€œis allowed only to designate something and not to mean it."€ This process reaches its fullest development in the modern language of advertising slogans, wherein linguistic signifiers come to represent nothing beyond the manufactured products for which they arbitrarily stand. <br /> <br />This panel invites papers exploring how modernist literature engages with Adorno and Horkheimer's theory of language. How might we understand this theory in the context of the historical moment that produces modernism? How might returning directly to Adorno and Horkheimer'€™s text enable us to productively reconsider the relationship between the language of modernism and that of advertising and mass culture? How might modernist texts illustrate, elaborate on, or challenge this notion of the arbitrariness of linguistic signification under enlightenment thought? How might modernist representation either be complicit in or resist the various forms of human oppression that Dialectic of Enlightenment associates with rationality? Papers are encouraged that elaborate on Adorno and Horkheimer'€™s vision of language and/or extend this vision to readings of specific modernist texts. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Greg Chase (gregchs@bu.edu) by March 31st. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Greg Chase

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MSA 18: Waste and the Archive


Waste and the Archive <br /> <br />This proposed panel for MSA 18 will explore the relationship between waste and the archive in modernism. Concerns about waste pervaded the modern period: many high modernists sought to eradicate wasteful and excess language from their literary productions, while the rise of a consumer culture created increasing amounts of rubbish. Our idea of the modern archive has expanded too in recent years to include cultural productions such as the lowbrow, middlebrow, and popular culture: ‘trashy’ literature is now precious. Considering the conference’s theme of culture and industry, this panel seeks papers that examine the material and figurative excesses and waste created in modern cultural production and what kind of unofficial, portable, ad-hoc, and non-traditional archives these wastes and excesses produced in turn. From the detritus of a life, collected in the literary archive—scribblings, lists, works-in-progress—to things we might not consider cultural archives at all—rubbish, odors, food scraps—this panel will examine the possibilities of and anxieties surrounding modernist archives full of waste. <br /> <br />Topics may include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />--alternative archives: lowbrow and middlebrow, popular culture, non-literary archives <br />--thing theory, object studies, collectors, hoarders <br />--waste studies, recycling, environmental and natural archives <br />--portable archives, new technologies, data and information <br />--works-in-progress, leftovers, excesses, remains, overflow <br />--the politics of archives in relation to gender, racial, class, and sexual identities <br /> <br />Please submit paper proposals of no more than 250 words and a brief bio to laura.james@stonybrook.edu and r.m.bowler@keele.ac.uk by March 31 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Laura James

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MSA 18 Niche lit: Modernism and Popular Culture Sub-Genres


Over the past twenty years, "new modernist" scholars have productively interrogated, probed, and disassembled the "great divide" between modernism and popular culture. Numerous critical accounts have appeared analyzing modernism's relations to major popular forms and genres (adventure tales, crime fiction, comic strips, science fiction, Hollywood films, radio plays, Jazz music, etc.). <br /> <br />This panel seeks to continue and extend these efforts by examining modernism's connections to and exchanges with heretofore under-explored sub-genres of popular culture, illuminating popular modernism's "niche lit." Panelists might examine such varied sub-genres as fairy tale fantasy, how to books, romance pulps, esoteric magazines, animal comics, picture books, time-travel romances, Romans a  clef, ghost stories, proletarian fiction, lesbian fantasy, etc. etc. <br /> <br />Please send paper abstracts of 350-500 words and brief bio-bibliographical statements by March 31 to Paul Peppis: ppeppis@uoregon.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2016

For more information, contact: Paul Peppis

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MSA 18: Mass Culture and Affective States in Modernism


This proposed panel for MSA 18 will explore how mass cultural productions generate affect (or hope to generate affect) in individuals and groups in the context of technological and sociopolitical shifts in the early twentieth century. Through this inquiry, we will consider how the twentieth-century culture industry developed from complex affective experiences and investments and propose methods for exploring subjective experiences of mass culture through affect. What do affective states such as shock, fascination, disgust, identification, dis-identification, resistance, and indifference reveal about early twentieth-century interactions with the productions of the culture industry? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300-500 words to Laurel Harris at lharris@rider.edu by March 30. (Note: This is not a guaranteed session).

Conference Location: Pasadena CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Laurel Harris

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MSA 18: Modernist Texts and Core Curriculum


Despite modernism’s reputation for “difficulty,” new interdisciplinary approaches, innovations in digital humanities, and connections to popular culture make modernist texts particularly suited to required core (undergraduate) courses. This roundtable will present ways in which early career scholars can capitalize on developments in modernist studies to enhance core curriculum teaching. We are interested in approaches to teaching modernist texts in introductory writing, introductory literature, and introductory humanities classes such as close-reading practices that encourage critical thinking skills in diverse classroom settings, guided research opportunities for students from a variety of backgrounds, and multi-modal lessons which might incorporate digital elements In our teaching practice, we hope to expand the reach of modernism - particularly modernist writers and texts recently added to the canon -- as we believe our area of research has a great deal of pedagogical value. At the same time, we recognize the institutional realities of balancing scholarship and teaching and the limitation of resources. In this roundtable, we hope to bring together presenters from diverse institutions who want to reach students whose goals and areas of interest do not directly connect with the study of literature to discuss rationales, objectives, and strategies for teaching modernist texts as well as the rewards and challenges of teaching these texts. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300 words or less and a brief bio by March 30, 2016 to lauren.rosenblum@gmail.com (Note: this is not a guaranteed roundtable).

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Lauren Rosenblum

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MSA 18: Modernism's Planets


CFP for MSA 18 (Pasadena, CA): Modernism's Planets <br /> <br />Planets colliding: Spivak, Friedman, Dimock. The 'planet', as metaphor, object, method, problem, and more, has made multiple entries into the discipline of literary studies, all of which bear on the study of modernism, broadly conceived. Ecocritical, postcolonial, and comparative methods have been at the forefront of the planetary conversation, but, as the word 'planet' suggests, there is more than enough room for more planetary interventions. <br /> <br />This panel will convene scholars of modernism with planetary interests, broadly conceived, and welcomes papers that touch on any aspect of the planetary turn in literary studies. I welcome all submissions, but particularly those dealing with astronomy and planetary scale, the history of astronomical research, and those that bring together the two terms of the theme of the conference, culture and industry (i.e. industrial manufacture of astronomical telescopes, global flows of manufactured goods, cultures of science and astronomy and more). Papers that address the material history of planetary formations, or the disciplinary implications of planetary thinking for modernism are also welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word proposal, along with a brief bio, by March 15, 2016, to Coilin Parsons (coilin.parsons@georgetown.edu). <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Coilin Parsons

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MSA 18: Modernist Cultures of Information


Although "€œinformation" seems to be a very contemporary term, quantitative approaches that identify, process, and visualize phenomena as data did not emerge fully formed at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Rapid technological and social change in the early twentieth century called for new ways of representing the world, many of which were quantitative in nature, and many of which were (or could be) seen as revolutionary in ways that we associate with the avant-garde. What theories of data circulated in modernism? How was art or knowledge treated as information during the modernist period? <br /> <br />Topics might include, but are not limited to, <br /> <br />1. Data collection or data-based argumentation in academic fields in the early twentieth century (e.g., sociology, psychology) <br /> <br />2. Early twentieth century contributions to information theory (including early figures in computing, such as Alan Turing) <br /> <br />3. New visual modes of presenting data (tables, graphs, photographs) <br /> <br />4. Innovations in information presentation or processing during World War I <br /> <br />5. Cultural histories of new technologies or machines for saving data <br /> <br />6. Changes in or modernist theories of typography, book design, or periodical layouts <br /> <br />7. Data collection by governments, businesses, or organization (census-taking, book-keeping, map-making) <br /> <br />8. Poetics of data in modernist texts, films, or visual art <br /> <br />Preference will be given to papers that emphasize data cultures (rather than a reading of a single literary text) in order to construct an interdisciplinary understanding of modernist information. Please submit 250-300 word abstracts by March 30, 2016, to shawnaross@tamu.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2016

For more information, contact: Shawna Ross

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MSA 18: Crossing the Modernist Border


In Atlas of the European Novel, Franco Moretti argues that discourse changes at the border. When we cross geopolitical lines our stories, style, and language all record the shift. As the geographical expansion of modernism continues to occupy an important place in the field, what do national border crossings indicate about the shape of our defined literatures and the disciplinary approaches we use to study them? Might writing, performing, or screening the border itself articulate the "cultural parataxis" Susan Stanford Friedman describes in her model of planetarity? Or, as Michelle Clayton argues in "Modernism's Moving Bodies," can the analysis of particular embodied transit help us move us away from global generalizations and towards "comparative particularisms"? This panel welcomes creative and far-ranging approaches to borders while maintaining especial interest in papers that attend in some way to actual, embodied crossings. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word proposal and a short bio to Kevin Riordan (kriordan@ntu.edu.sg) by March 20th.

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 20, 2016

For more information, contact: Kevin Riordan

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&quot;Teaching Wallace Stevens&quot;


CFP: Teaching Wallace Stevens (Special Issue of The Wallace Stevens Journal) <br />**DEADLINE EXTENDED** <br /> <br />Over twenty years have passed since John N. Serio and B. J. Leggett published their collection, Teaching Wallace Stevens (1994). Since then the teaching landscape has been undergoing significant change. Are there new challenges and opportunities for teaching Stevens in the twenty-first century, with the growing diversity of our student populations, shifting job possibilities (or lack of them), the increasing marginalization of the humanities and of poetry in particular? In this era of globalization, what success have you had teaching Stevens to speakers of other languages and readers from different cultures? <br /> <br />Deadline: one-page proposals by March 15, 2016 to glen.macleod@uconn.edu . If your proposal is accepted, you will be asked to expand it into a full-length essay by September 1, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Storrs, CT, USA
Conference Starts: March 15, 2016
Conference Ends: March 16, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Glen MacLeod

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MSA 18: Regional Modernism Beyond the Nation


CFP for MSA 18: Regional Modernism Beyond the Nation <br /> <br />This panel seeks papers on the convergence of 20th-century American regionalism and modernism, especially in a transnational sense, for the 2016 Modernist Studies Association conference, 17-20 November, in Pasadena, California (https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa18/). <br /> <br />In his essay for The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism entitled Regionalism in American Modernism, John N. Duvall concedes that efforts "to link regionalism to American modernism may seem, at first blush, a perverse enterprise" (242). Indeed, modernist studies scholars have commonly considered "modernist" and "regionalist" contradictory terms. Even as important efforts have been made recently to mediate these terms, including a special issue of Modern Fiction Studies devoted to "Regional Modernism," scholarly work that brings the discourses of modernism and regionalism into closer conversation remains urgent. This panel seeks attempts to map out a space for early-20th-century American regionalist fiction within modernist studies while exploring the transnational possibilities of "regional modernism." More than just the quaint local-color fiction of a previous generation, the regional modernist fiction of the early 20th century might be understood, like the more celebrated globe-trotting international modernism, as an attempt to reject the nation-state as the normative organizational unit for American community. <br /> <br />In the recent "spatial turn," with its transnational aspirations, modernist studies have at times idealized the trans- without fully considering the national. Modernist fiction, as Jon Hegglund asserts, does not simply transcend this national attachment in the 20th century, rather it continually mediates the scale of the national. Instead of putting forward another spatial scale that outflanks the nation-state, what might be gained by turning to modernist writing that negotiates national attachment and seeks to think transnationally through the sub-national scale of the region? Can we understand "regional modernism" as an attempt to imagine America beyond the territorial nation-state, not through the globe-trotting internationalism more commonly associated with modernism, but according to its intra-national and sub-national distinctiveness? How might such a regional modernism connect local communities beyond national boundaries to non-US "American" spaces like those of the Caribbean, or Central and South America? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 500 words or less and a brief bio statement by March 15 to Jace Gatzemeyer (jpg224@psu.edu). (Note: this is a special session and not a guaranteed session). <br /> <br />Keywords: regional modernism, American regionalism, American modernism, transnationalism <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, United States
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Jace Gatzemeyer

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MSA 18: First Encounters: Early Cinema and American Modernism


Over the past few decades, important scholarship under the rubric of the New Modernist Studies has unearthed the tensile relationship of film and literary modernism. This scholarship has, by and large, focused on the cinematic qualities of the work of certain modernists such as Virginia Woolf and John Dos Passos. A related body of work has examined, usually anecdotally or biographically, the careers of modernists like William Faulkner and F. Scott Fitzgerald who tried their luck in Hollywood during the 1930s. As rewarding as this work has proved to be, scholars of modernism have seemed less interested in considering just how literary culture more broadly responded to the motion picture at the very moment of – and in the immediate aftermath of – its emergence. <br /> <br />This panel takes as its starting point the quite radical transformations in American cultural life of the early twentieth century – in particular, the increasing interdependence of writing and film cultures. As Marsha Orgeron has noted, “something in the culture of authorship was changing, and the shift was at least in part a result of the demands and operating principles of the motion picture industry” (“Rethinking Authorship” 2003). This panel aims to move the discussion of modernism and cinema beyond a focus on aesthetics, and beyond – or, in advance of – the 1930s to consider the interactions of cinema and writing cultures more broadly. And, while scholars have largely framed this relationship in terms of a rivalry, we would like to consider the opportunities the upstart medium might have provided for modernist communities, institutions and practitioners. <br /> <br />In sum, we hope to expand the chronology as well as the ways in which we conceptualize modernist literary culture’s relation to cinema. We particularly invite papers that examine archival materials, copyright laws, subsidiary rights, motion-picture tie-ins, celebrity and fan-magazine culture, studio attempts to lure authors out West, and so forth, in order to produce a fuller account of a modernist literary culture deeply entangled with – indeed, perhaps inseparable from – early cinema culture. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 350-500 words, and a brief bio statement, by March 15 to Sarah Gleeson-White: sarah.gleeson-white@sydney.edu.au (Note: This is not a guaranteed session). <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pasadena, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Sarah Gleeson-White

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MSA 18: Modernist Paratexts


In Seuils (1987), Gerard Genette posed a rhetorical question about a canonical modernist text to highlight the functional importance of the then largely ignored paratext: "€œreduced to its text alone and without the help of any instructions for use, how would we read James Joyce'€™s Ulysses if it were not called Ulysses?" Genette undertook a synchronic structuralist account of the paratext, the body of productions, such as the title, author's name, preface, epigraph, footnote, illustration, or dedicatory letter, that constitutes the zone of transition and transaction surrounding a text and presenting it as a text. <br /> <br />This proposed panel, Modernist Paratexts, seeks papers working from the diachronic angle: What was happening to the paratext in the modernist period? Which paratextual forms proliferated, which declined, and why? To what uses was this "€œprivileged site of a pragmatics and a strategy" put? In what ways was the paratext used by authors and their agents “in the service, well or badly understood or accomplished, of a better reception of the text and a more pertinent reading" of it? While Genette'™s work productively frames this panel'™s inquiries, all theoretical and critical approaches to the paratext are welcome. In keeping with the conference theme "Culture Industries," papers might consider the new modes of cultural production and consumption announced or invited by the paratext in the modernist period. <br /> <br />Potential paper topics include but are not limited to: <br />--The fate and/or uses of one or more paratextual forms, such as the preface, epigraph, footnote, illustration, and dedicatory letter; authorial or non-authorial paratexts; original, subsequent, or belated paratexts <br />--Paratexts mediating different reading publics <br />--The paratext and new communication or media technologies <br />--The paratext in periodicals or little magazines <br />--The paratext and small printing presses <br />--The paratext in other art forms or media <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of 350-500 words and a brief bio-bibliographical statement by March 15 to Sarah Copland (coplands2@macewan.ca).

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Sarah Copland

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Formalist Poetry in the Age of Modernism


<br /> <br />CFP: Formalist Poetry in the Age of Modernism <br />MSA 18, Pasadena, CA, 17-20 November 2016 <br /> <br />Modernist poetics might include all sorts of experiment and innovations: it has largely been defined through negation, adding up to something like “everything but tradition” or, at least, “make it new.” But what about those significant poets of the early twentieth century whose work adhered the formalist tradition by working within the recognizable genres such as the sonnet, the narrative, and the dramatic monologue? This panel welcomes work on major and minor poets including but not limited to Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, Robinson Jeffers, Sara Teasdale, Louise Bogan, Claude McKay, and Jean Toomer. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300 words or less and a brief bio statement by March 15 to Geneva Gano (gmgano@txstate.edu). (Note: this is a special session and not a guaranteed session). <br /> <br />Keywords: Poetry, poetics; formalism, tradition, modernist poetics

Conference Location: Pasadena, CA, USA
Conference Starts: November 17, 2016
Conference Ends: November 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Geneva Gano

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Modernism and Graphic Narrative (Special Session, MLA 2017)


MLA 2017 Special Session: Modernism and Graphic Narrative (DEADLINE 3/10/16) <br /> <br />This is a call for abstracts for a proposed special session for MLA 2017 in Philadelphia. The proposal for the special session is due on April 1, 2016. Acceptance at the call for paper stage is NOT a guarantee of the session being accepted and running at MLA 2017. <br /> <br />This proposed special session will explore the relationships and connections between modernism and graphic narrative. Panelists may consider (but are certainly not limited to): <br /> <br />+ narrative theory, modernism, and comics <br />+ the influence of modernism on comics and graphic narrative <br />+ modernist ways of reading graphic narrative <br />+ intertextuality and adaptation <br />+ perspective and consciousness <br />+ space and time <br />+ architecture <br />+ design <br />+ race and ethnicity <br />+ gender <br />+ class <br /> <br />etc. <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts accompanied by a short biographical note by 10 March 2016 to Janine Utell, janine.utell@gmail.com

Conference Location: Philadelphia, USA
Conference Starts: January 05, 2017
Conference Ends: January 08, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2016

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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Lawrence and the 'New Modernism'


Earlier conceptions of modernism often excluded Lawrence or vilified him as a reactionary, but more flexible and expansive recent concepts of modernism may re-position him. We invite papers exploring how new perspectives such as global modernism, trans-nationalism, materialist modernism, and other new modernist concepts or frameworks affect the meaning and/or importance of one or more of Lawrence’s works. Send abstracts by Mar. 1, 2016, to nancy.paxton@nau.edu

Conference Location: Philadelphia, PA, USA
Conference Starts: January 05, 2017
Conference Ends: January 08, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Nancy Paxton

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Conrad and Lawrence at Sea


<br />"Conrad and Lawrence at Sea" <br /> <br />The Joseph Conrad Society and D.H. Lawrence Society of North America <br />invite proposals for a joint session at MLA 2017. <br /> <br />Although Conrad and Lawrence disliked each other’s writing, both spent significant amounts of time at sea. We invite proposals comparing their representations of the sea in short stories, novels, or non-fiction as well as proposals that take “at sea” as a metaphor for uncertainty, artistic transition, the “oceanic,” the sublime, or related topics. Please send 250-word abstracts to Joyce Wexler by March 1. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Philadelphia, US
Conference Starts: January 01, 2017
Conference Ends: January 01, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Joyce Wexler

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Lawrence and the New Modernisms


D.H. Lawrence Society invites abstracts for a guaranteed session, sponsored by the DHLSNA, on “Lawrence and the ‘New Modernisms’”: Earlier conceptions of modernism often excluded Lawrence or vilified him as a reactionary, but more flexible and expansive recent concepts of modernism may re-position him. We invite papers exploring how new perspectives such as global modernism, transnationalism, materialist modernism, and other new modernist concepts or frameworks affect the meaning and/or importance of one or more of Lawrence’s works. Send abstracts by Mar. 1, 2016, to nancy.paxton@nau.edu

Conference Location: Philadelphia, US
Conference Starts: January 05, 2017
Conference Ends: January 08, 2017

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2016

For more information, contact: Nancy Paxton

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21st Century Norbert Wiener: Thinking Machines in the Physical World


The Society for the Social Implications of Technology invites you to participate in the 2nd IEEE Conference on Norbert Wiener in the 21st Century: "Thinking Machines in the Physical World." The conference will focus on opportunities and threats presented by advances in cognitive computing, in the context of Wiener’s technical work and his concerns regarding technology and society.This conference follows the successful inaugural conference in Boston, June 2014. <br /> <br />Norbert Wiener was a mathematician, philosopher, scientist and engineer whose pioneering work in mathematics, computer science, systems control, biology and engineering led to cybernetics (the origin of “cyberspace” and “cyborgs”). <br /> <br />We invite paper submissions that consider Wiener’s work from perspectives across applied, hard, and social sciences, as well as the humanities, fine arts, and professional/industry practice. Conference topics will include: <br /> <br />-Cognitive computing in theory and practice. <br />-Wiener’s fields of work (cybernetics, information theory, philosophy, life sciences, interval computation, fuzzy sets, Brownian motion, analysis under uncertainty…). <br />-Wiener’s societal concerns (information ethics, innovation and economic development, robots and work, cyber warfare and crime, science fiction as social commentary, cybernetics and literature, art and design…) <br /> <br />All submissions will be online via the conference website (http://21stcenturywiener.org/). <br /> <br />Student research papers and posters are strongly encouraged, and proposals for creative/experimental session formats are welcome. <br /> <br />Full papers (up to 6 pages, due 14 Feb 2016) will be peer reviewed. Accepted, presented papers will be provided for publication to IEEEXplore. Authors must prepare papers in the IEEE conference style (available on the website). <br /> <br />Abstracts (up to 500 words) for research-in-progress and practitioner presentations will be assessed for relevance to the conference (not published in IEEEXplore), as <br />will student posters (A2). <br /> <br />If you require confirmation of acceptance earlier than the dates above, please contact us at NorbertWiener-2016@unimelb.edu.au <br /> <br />For questions from humanities scholars about the conference's interdisciplinary scope, please contact Heather A. Love (heather.love@usd.edu).

Conference Location: Melbourne, Australia
Conference Starts: July 13, 2016
Conference Ends: July 15, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Heather Love

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Recovering the Hidden Carlyle


The Oak and The Acorns: <br />Recovering the Hidden Carlyle <br /> <br />July 6-8, 2016 <br />To be held at <br />The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) <br />Oxford University <br /> <br /> <br />“It is an idle question to ask whether his books will be read a century hence: if they were all burnt as the grandest of Suttees on his funeral-pile, it would only be like cutting down an oak after its acorns have sown a forest. For there is hardly a superior or active mind of this generation that has not been modified by Carlyle’s writings; there has hardly been an English book written for the last ten or twelve years that would not have been different if Carlyle had not lived.” <br />George Eliot, “Thomas Carlyle” (1855) <br /> <br />Several generations read the works of Thomas Carlyle with surprise, awe, inspiration, fervor, excitement, and occasionally anger—and they went on to shape the rest of the 19th century and much of the 20th century with the words and prophecies of Carlyle embedded in their politics, philosophy, art, literature, history, and ideals for a better world. <br /> <br />Some of these impacts would have pleased Carlyle; others would have greatly surprised him, and a few, perhaps, would have dismayed him. But for good and ill, Carlyle left an impact that in some ways is hard to see because it is so deeply pervasive. <br /> <br />This conference aims to retrieve that hidden Carlyle, and to recognize how he served, and continues to serve, as a bedrock of far-ranging ideals for several generations of readers and admirers. <br /> <br />For this conference, we invite proposals that explore the rich diversity of where Carlyle lies hidden in the vision and hopes of eminent Victorians, Edwardians, and Modernists throughout England, Scotland, Ireland, Europe, and across the ocean in America and beyond. Because Jane Welsh Carlyle had a similar effect on the readers of her letters, both in her lifetime and afterwards, we also invite proposals that address her continuing influence as well. <br /> <br />We especially welcome papers that delineate how the reception of Carlyle’s works shaped critical movements in politics, art, historiography, literature, including (among many): <br /> <br />Socialism <br />Communism <br />Muscular Christianity <br />The Gospel of Work <br />Pre-Raphaelite Art <br />The New Biography <br />Modernism <br />Young Ireland/Irish Nationalism <br />Transcendentalism <br /> <br />We also welcome papers that explore individual figures from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and their relation to the writings of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. A short list of significant figures influenced by the Carlyles includes: <br /> <br />Charles Dickens <br />John Stuart Mill <br />Karl Marx and Frederic Engels <br />Benjamin Disraeli <br />George Eliot <br />Erasmus and Charles Darwin <br />James Anthony Froude <br />Leslie Stephen <br />Alfred Lord Tennyson <br />Robert Browning <br />Elizabeth Barrett-Browning <br />William Morris <br />John Ruskin <br />Lady Jane “Speranza” Wilde <br />Oscar Wilde <br />W.E.B. DuBois <br />Ralph Waldo Emerson <br />Margaret Fuller <br />Henry David Thoreau <br />Friedrich Nietzsche <br />Virginia Woolf <br />James Joyce <br /> <br />Conference website: http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/cfp-recovering-hidden-carlyle <br /> <br />Proposals of no more than 500 words, along with short CV, should be sent by February 15, 2016 to: <br />Marylu Hill (Villanova University): marylu.hill@villanova.edu <br />and <br />Paul E. Kerry (Oxford/BYU): paul.kerry@ccc.ox.ac.uk

Conference Location: Oxford, UK
Conference Starts: July 06, 2016
Conference Ends: July 08, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2016

For more information, contact: Marylu Hill

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Under Surveillance in the Space Between, 1914-1945


Under Surveillance in the Space Between, 1914-1945 <br />June 2-4, 2016 <br />McGill University, Montreal, Quebec <br /> <br />The 18th annual conference of the Space Between Society focuses on the concept of surveillance—watching, listening, recording—as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, media, and spatial or material culture between 1914 and 1945. From the rise of totalitarianism to the dwindling borders of the British Empire, global citizens were under constant scrutiny as governments, artists, and documentarians developed new ways of listening in. The establishment of intelligence agencies such as the FBI and MI5 just prior to WWI; the standardization of the passport and increased policing of borders; the formation of Mass Observation, with its trained observers who “may be watching you”; the mass production of the 35mm camera and other technologies of information gathering: all reveal a widespread concern with observation. People looked both forward and back, documenting traditions and making plans for the future. <br /> <br />This conference asks not only how tropes of surveillance and documentation shaped culture in the years spanning the First and Second World Wars, but also how artists, writers, filmmakers, and activists resisted surveillance, whether by going underground or by watching the watchers. From the nightmare world of Franz Kafka’s The Trial to the panoptic dystopia of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, from the spy film’s impetus to track the “foreigner” to the ever increasing need for documentation, the culture and politics of observation proliferate across this tumultuous period. <br /> <br />We welcome proposals that engage with the concept and representation of surveillance in wartime and the interwar period. Potential topics might include: <br /> <br />• Spies, espionage, surveillance, detection <br />• Documentary, journalism, (auto)ethnography, Mass Observation <br />• Archives, museums, public records, exhibitions <br />• Blackouts, black markets, budgets, censorship, containment <br />• Treachery, betrayal, blackmail, extortion, collaboration <br />• Double-crossers, femme fatales, leaks, moles, informants <br />• Gossip and eavesdropping <br />• Documentation, identification, passports, citizenship, rights <br />• Borders, colonial policing, social surveillance, racial profiling <br />• Resisting or evading surveillance <br />• Radio broadcasts and transmissions <br />• Radar, photography, film, voyeurism, spectatorship <br />• Architecture, spatial planning, urban design <br />• Genre fiction: spy, crime, detective, thriller <br />• Supervision, education, discipline, unsupervised children <br />• Policing the margins of class, race, gender, sexuality, and religion <br />• Interrogation, confession, witnesses, refugees <br />• Home front regulations, civilian forces, vigilantes, self-policing <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and short biographical statement to ariel.buckley@mcgill.ca by January 11, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: June 02, 2016
Conference Ends: June 04, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: January 11, 2016

For more information, contact: Robin Feenstra

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Under Surveillance in the Space Between


Under Surveillance in the Space Between, 1914-1945 <br />June 2-4, 2016 <br />McGill University, Montreal, Quebec <br /> <br />NOTE: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JANUARY 11, 2016 <br /> <br />The 18th annual conference of the Space Between Society focuses on the concept of surveillance—watching, listening, recording—as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, media, and spatial or material culture between 1914 and 1945. From the rise of totalitarianism to the dwindling borders of the British Empire, global citizens were under constant scrutiny as governments, artists, and documentarians developed new ways of listening in. The establishment of intelligence agencies such as the FBI and MI5 just prior to WWI; the standardization of the passport and increased policing of borders; the formation of Mass Observation, with its trained observers who “may be watching you”; the mass production of the 35mm camera and other technologies of information gathering: all reveal a widespread concern with observation. People looked both forward and back, documenting traditions and making plans for the future. <br /> <br />This conference asks not only how tropes of surveillance and documentation shaped culture in the years spanning the First and Second World Wars, but also how artists, writers, filmmakers, and activists resisted surveillance, whether by going underground or by watching the watchers. From the nightmare world of Franz Kafka’s The Trial to the panoptic dystopia of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, from the spy film’s impetus to track the “foreigner” to the ever increasing need for documentation, the culture and politics of observation proliferate across this tumultuous period. <br /> <br />We welcome proposals that engage with the concept and representation of surveillance in wartime and the interwar period. Potential topics might include: <br /> <br />• Spies, espionage, surveillance, detection <br />• Documentary, journalism, (auto)ethnography, Mass Observation <br />• Archives, museums, public records, exhibitions <br />• Blackouts, black markets, budgets, censorship, containment <br />• Treachery, betrayal, blackmail, extortion, collaboration <br />• Double-crossers, femme fatales, leaks, moles, informants <br />• Gossip and eavesdropping <br />• Documentation, identification, passports, citizenship, rights <br />• Borders, colonial policing, social surveillance, racial profiling <br />• Resisting or evading surveillance <br />• Radio broadcasts and transmissions <br />• Radar, photography, film, voyeurism, spectatorship <br />• Architecture, spatial planning, urban design <br />• Genre fiction: spy, crime, detective, thriller <br />• Supervision, education, discipline, unsupervised children <br />• Policing the margins of class, race, gender, sexuality, and religion <br />• Interrogation, confession, witnesses, refugees <br />• Home front regulations, civilian forces, vigilantes, self-policing <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and short biographical statement to ariel.buckley@mcgill.ca by January 11, 2016. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: June 02, 2016
Conference Ends: June 04, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: January 11, 2016

For more information, contact: Ariel Buckley

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Presumed Autonomy: Literature and the Arts in Theory and Practice


PRESUMED AUTONOMY: <br />Literature and the Arts in Theory and Practice <br /> <br />10-13 May 2016 <br />Department of English, Stockholm University <br /> <br />Confirmed Keynotes: Tim Armstrong (Royal Holloway, University of London), Jane Bennett (Johns Hopkins University), Nicholas Brown (University of Illinois, Chicago), Anne A. Cheng (Princeton University), Peter Kalliney (University of Kentucky), Chris Salter (Concordia University), Gisèle Sapiro (L'Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales, EHESS, Paris), and Lisa Siraganian (Southern Methodist University). <br /> <br /> <br />Ever since the emergence of the modern marketplace for cultural goods, literary texts and art works have, on occasion, defied the expectations of its readers and audience, affronted their moral ethos, or flaunted a disregard for their sensibilities and norms. The potential power of art to disrupt the perceptions of its audience was foregrounded in the critical discourse of the modernists and the historical avant-garde and this possibility continues to animate critical debates, particularly those organized around some understanding of autonomy. With the all but complete commodification of every artistic and literary practice, it is more urgent than ever to pose the question whether we can still presume autonomy. <br /> <br />The four-day conference seeks to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines to assess, from the perspective of the present, the historical trajectory of autonomy as it has been conceptualized, recognized, assumed, deployed, and questioned by critics and practitioners of art, and to explore artistic, philosophical, cultural, and institutional negotiations of art as embedded in and entangled with the multiple heteronomies of market, state, religion, education… (a list that cannot be complete). As there are important intersections between various definitions of autonomy as well as artistic practices, several methodological and thematic strands will be brought together in four streams: <br /> <br />–Autonomy and the Avant-garde <br />–Theories of aesthetic autonomy <br />–Fields, markets, capitals, commodities and autonomy <br />–Autonomy and the body <br /> <br />The conference organizers invite contributions that address the issues indicated in the rubrics above. You can choose either to earmark your abstract for one of the streams, or send it in for general consideration. The list below can be taken to indicate the scope of those particular and general concerns, while not necessarily restricting the possibilities. Proposals for presentations should address the problematics of autonomy in relation to one or several of the following thematic headings: <br /> <br />–aesthetic codings of the modern: myths, styles, temporalities, and techniques <br />–affect <br />–the architecture of thought <br />–biopower and control <br />–capitalism <br />–the commodity <br />–contemporary critical efforts to re-theorize form <br />–the debate between activist and normative formalisms <br />–early twentieth-century theorizations of literature and modern art <br />–ecologies <br />–technologies <br />–fields of cultural production <br />–education, the university: formation, reproduction and defense of autonomy <br />–forms of capital <br />–global modernisms <br />–the historical avant-garde <br />–inaesthetics <br />–institutions <br />–living materialities <br />–national, transnational, and postnational frameworks <br />–object-oriented vs. becoming-oriented paradigms <br />–politics <br />–the (post)human body <br />–spaces, territories, place <br />–the state as the source of autonomy or heteronomy <br />–œworld literature,” the postcolonial condition, and economic globalization <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Please submit your paper abstract (about 500 words) and a brief biographical note either by email to autonomy@english.su.se or click PROPOSAL SUBMISSION for online submission. The deadline for submissions is on 15 December, 2015. <br /> <br />Conference organizers: <br />Gul Bilge Han (Department of English, Stockholm University) <br />Bo G. Ekelund (Department of English, Stockholm University) <br />Hans Färnlöf (Department of Romance Studies and Classics, Stockholm University) <br />Marina Ludwigs (Department of English, Stockholm University) <br />Charlotta Palmstierna Einarsson (Department of English, Stockholm University) <br />Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva (Department of English, Stockholm University)

Conference Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Conference Starts: May 10, 2016
Conference Ends: May 13, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: January 05, 2016

For more information, contact: Gul, Bo, Hans, Marina, Lotta and Irina

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