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Call for Proposals (Essay Collection): Teaching Modernist Women Writers in English


Essay proposals are invited for a volume entitled Teaching Modernist Women’s Writing in English, to appear in the Options for Teaching series published by the Modern Language Association. The purpose of the volume is to meet the needs of instructors seeking pedagogical strategies for teaching modernist women’s writing in English and the ways in which women were vital creators and participants in the works and networks of modernism. The volume aims to capture the multiplicity of artistic, political, and social networks of which women writers were a part, crossing gender, class, and national boundaries, and to share ways to teach these connections and concepts from a wide range of contributors who work from different critical orientations and in different types of institutions and classroom settings. The volume will include material relevant for specialists and generalists who are teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as in alternative classroom and institutional situations. The teaching resources to be shared will include current scholarship, readings, and digital tools. <br /> <br />Essays responding to four general areas through the lens of pedagogical theory and practice are sought: teaching modernism or modernist studies, thematic concerns, genre or form, and theoretical or methodological approaches. Contributions might cover topics related to issues and definitions in modernist studies, particularly as relevant to the study of women writers. These essays might focus on contexts and conceptual questions important to modernism and highlight the importance of women writers therein. Some essays might take up the teaching of a specific theme (e.g., trauma, colonialism, globalization, race, class, sexuality) or topic (e.g., suffrage, war, empire, socialism, communism, fascism, the workplace, little magazines, the literary marketplace). Other essays might look at the ways women writers used particular forms and genres (fiction, documentary, journalism, life writing, poetry, pamphlets or manifestos, “the middlebrow,” genre fiction, working-class writing, film, drama); these might consider teaching the tension between tradition and the avant-garde or the noteworthy contributions that women made to the avant-garde. Finally, essays might describe and exemplify teaching informed by particular critical or methodological approaches, such as theoretical perspectives (postcolonial studies, queer studies, narrative theory), interdisciplinary work (art, music, dance, science, technology) or intertextuality, the digital humanities, and the teaching of writing or multimodal pedagogy. A balance is sought among writers from the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as writers working in English from other regions of the world (e.g., the Caribbean, India). <br /> <br />Proposals should mention and define specific terms, concepts, techniques, and classroom contexts as appropriate. They should describe the intended topic, particularly the pedagogical approach taken to teaching modernist women’s writing, including methodology, evidence, theoretical or critical framework, and significance for those teaching in the field. The proposal should indicate the value of the intended topic to a broad range of instructors and should maintain a clear focus on teaching. Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from the students. <br /> <br />Proposals of 500 words (for potential completed essays of 3,000–3,500 words) should be sent to Janine Utell (janine.utell@gmail.com) by 1 December 2015 via e-mail.  Proposals may also be submitted through the site on the MLA Commons dedicated to the volume's development:  https://modwomen.commons.mla.org <br /> <br />Visit the MLA Commons site dedicated to the development of this volume; you'll find the book proposal, resources, opportunity to offer comment and feedback, as well as this call and a submission portal:  https://modwomen.commons.mla.org <br /> <br />Deadline:  Dec. 1, 2015

Conference Location: essay collection, essay collection
Conference Starts: July 28, 2015
Conference Ends: December 01, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: December 01, 2015

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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Modernist Emotions (French Society for Modernist Studies)


MODERNIST EMOTIONS <br /> <br />The second international conference of the French Society for Modernist Studies <br />Société d’études modernistes (SEM) <br />22-24 June 2016 <br />University Paris Ouest Nanterre <br />France <br /> <br />Keynote speakers: <br />Laura MARCUS (New College, Oxford) <br />Jean-Michel RABATÉ (University of Pennsylvania) <br /> <br />Call for Papers: <br />In continuation of the society’s inaugural conference on Modernist communities, we now propose to explore the debate over emotions in the Modernist era. Despite famous claims of impersonality and the suppression of the “I” from the literary work, beginning with Ezra Pound’s merciless editing of T.S. Eliot’s Waste Land, the transparency and objectivity of an emotion-free subject has remained an ever-receding horizon. Even Ezra Pound’s image is “an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time,” which combines the rush of “primary” conception and emotion with the impulse to create the new forms of a new aesthetics (Blast 1914). Rationality and the irrational collide in the vortex, as emotions are in fact viewed in an ambivalent manner by Modernists, both as the sentimentalist rubbish assigned to a schematic revision of late Romanticism, thus to be eradicated, and as the very matter for the work of art, for aesthetic experimentation, and for the education of the public, in the context of an unnerving historical modernity. <br />Emotions create webs of interaction, or conversely isolate the individual in the labyrinth of intimacy. Language emerges as the mode of expression of emotions, or as the very obstacle separating us from a fantasized experience of pure emotion. We hope to foster reflection and discussion that will go beyond the paradox of a passionately anti-emotional Modernism towards a reconsideration of the large extent to which Modernism attempts to channel, remotivate, and revalue the power of emotion. <br />As the conference is organized by the French Society of Modernist Studies—Société d’Etudes Modernistes—, we seek to bring together scholars from all countries and hope to strengthen collaborations between French and international researchers. <br /> <br />Possible paper topics may include, but are not limited to: <br />Emotions across literary genres <br />Emotions across the arts and the new media (music, dance, film, radio, etc.) <br />Locating emotions: the spaces and places of emotions <br />Historicizing emotions: the war and the post-war, historical shocks, new emotions <br />The temporalities of emotion <br />Emotions and the body <br />Emotional disorders and apathy <br />Emotions and the sciences <br />Emotions across nations and cultures <br />Emotions, high culture, and mass culture <br />Emotions and gender <br />Emotions, movement, and transportation <br />The ethics of emotions <br />Political emotions <br />Modernism and the theories of affect <br /> <br />Organizers : Hélène Aji (helene.aji@u-paris10.fr), Caroline Pollentier (caroline.pollentier@hotmail.fr), Naomi Toth (ntoth@u-paris10.fr) <br /> <br />Scientific committee : <br />Hélène Aji (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre), Catherine Bernard (Université Paris Diderot), Nicholas Manning (Université Paris Sorbonne), Laura Marcus (New College, Oxford), Jean-Michel Rabaté (University of Pennsylvania), Caroline Pollentier (Université Paris Sorbonne nouvelle–Paris 3), Julie Taylor (Northumbria University), Naomi Toth (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre), Steven Yao (Hamilton College, New York). <br /> <br />Papers will be delivered in English. <br />Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short bio-bibliography to all three organisers by 15 November 2015.

Conference Location: Paris (Nanterre), France
Conference Starts: June 22, 2016
Conference Ends: June 24, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: November 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Helene AJI

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AMSN3: Modernist Work


AMSN3: Modernist Work <br /> <br />The Third Biennial Conference of the Australasian Modernist Studies Network <br /> <br />Date: 29-31 March 2016 <br />Venue: University of New South Wales, Sydney <br /> <br />Abstracts due: 1 October 2015 <br />Notification of acceptance: 1 November 2015 <br /> <br />This conference aims to explore the manifold intersections of modernist culture and the concept of “work”. Modernism emerged during a moment of rapid transformation in the conditions and meaning of labour. New jobs and professions proliferated with dizzying speed in the wake of the second industrial revolution, along with new techniques of “scientific management”. Under the influence of these and other changes, the kinds of work available to women changed markedly during the modernist period, while legal gender restrictions were abolished in a growing number of professions. At the same time, many strands of modernist culture involved a rethinking of the concept of “work” in literary and aesthetic domains, in often contradictory ways. Modernist writers and artists repeatedly interrogated the nature and function of an artistic career in an age of mass culture, and radical critiques of the notion of the art “work” itself—as organic, as self-contained, as a product of artistic skill—were launched from various sectors of the avant-garde. Numerous subsequent interventions in critical and aesthetic theory can be placed in the lineage of this initial modernist questioning of the work itself. <br /> <br />We are seeking papers on the relationship between modernism and work in any of its myriad configurations—formal, historical, empirical, theoretical, literal, metaphorical, textual, contextual, material and everything in between. We also welcome papers that test the boundaries of the concept of modernism itself, whether by extending its chronological scope, rethinking its traditional canon or questioning its privileged media. <br /> <br />Postgraduate travel bursaries <br /> <br />The Centre for Modernism Studies in Australia (UNSW) together with the Australasian Modernist Studies Network will offer a small number of bursaries of up to $500 each for Australian and international graduate students. Bursary applications will be invited following the acceptance of paper proposals. <br /> <br />Confirmed keynote speakers: <br /> <br />Professor Christopher Nealon (Johns Hopkins University) <br />Professor Morag Shiach (Queen Mary University of London) <br />Other keynote speakers to be advised <br /> <br />Proposals are invited for 20 minute papers or panels of three papers examining any aspect of the conference theme. Proposals from postgraduate students are especially encouraged. <br /> <br />Please send 300 word abstracts and a brief biographical note to j.attridge@unsw.edu.au by Thursday 1 October 2015. <br /> <br />Registration and other information will be available through the AMSN website, at http://amsn.org.au/

Conference Location: Sydney, Australia
Conference Starts: March 29, 2016
Conference Ends: March 31, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: October 01, 2015

For more information, contact: John Attridge

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Touching the Body in Pieces: Affective Ecologies of the Modern Body (NeMLA)


From artist Hans Bellmer’s distorted dolls, to Rupert Brooke’s “dust” in a “corner of a foreign field,” to Virginia Woolf’s “orts, scraps, and fragments,” bodies – textual, phenomenological, cultural, political, and physical – seem to fall to pieces in modernism. How can we conceptualize the modern body in light of its affective and ecological surrounds? <br /> <br />Broadly, this panel seeks to examine these ecologies of bodies and their surrounds in modernism. Specifically, we endeavor to explore textual bodies and their composition (or decomposition) in ways that help us understand the ecological placement of the body as it engages with modernism's historical and physical environments. What is the relation of modern bodies to both “hard” and “soft” surrounds? How is the natural body “queered” by the natural world or other surroundings? Does the queer intervene in these conceptions of dualistic bodies, as Judith Butler argues? How is the wounded body – which seems to negotiate both the hard and soft by opening permeable bodily and subjective bounds – represented in or through landscapes of war, or in relationships with nature and landscape? What is embodiment, or what are the boundaries of the body and its hard surrounds if the body itself is an affective environment or ecology of its own? How does modernity’s affective shift register or occlude a relationship between subject the “outside”? How is the body and/or its emotions disseminated, or dismantled? Related elements to consider could include WWI, WWII, “publicity,” cities and urbanity, T.S. Eliot’s cool impersonality, nation or politics, robotic or prosthetic bodies; and in parallel, the domestic, rurality, sentimentality, the homefront, sympathy or suffrage. <br /> <br />We welcome all approaches to the question of the modern body’s conceptualization or re-/de-conceptualization, including those that cross disciplinary bounds. <br /> <br />Go to http://www.cfplist.com//nemla/Home/S/15703 to submit a 200-300 word abstract by September 30, 2015. Email Molly Hall with any questions: molly_hall@my.uri.edu.

Conference Location: Hartford, CT, USA
Conference Starts: March 17, 2016
Conference Ends: March 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2015

For more information, contact: Molly Hall

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CFP: World Novels and 21st-Century Media


We welcome submissions to the World Novels and 21st Century Media seminar at ACLA 2016. Please find the CFP reproduced below; it i™s also available through this link: http://www.acla.org/seminar/world-novels-and-21st-century-media. Abstracts are due by September 23, 12am PST, and must be submitted through the ACLA online portal at http://www.acla.org/node/add/paper.” <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Seminar: World Novels and 21st-Century Media <br />2016 Annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association <br />Harvard University <br />March 17-20, 2016 <br /> <br />Organizers: Annie Galvin, University of Virginia (ahg8cy@virginia.edu) and Jap-Nanak Makkar, University of Virginia (jkm5ar@virginia.edu) <br /> <br /> <br />As Jessica Pressman and Sven Birkerts have noted, digital media technologies challenge the cultural priority we give to book-bound texts. To a reader of a novel, the book is just one reading format among others in our twenty-first-century media landscape. At the same time, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, John Johnston and Daniel Punday have considered the fate of literary fiction in a cultural environment saturated by a variety of visual media, including television, film, the internet, surveillance apparatuses and video games. These latter scholars suggest that novels compete with other media to remain a culturally significant conveyor of meaning and narrative. Challenges have been issued to both the novel's materiality and its representational strategies in the contemporary media ecology. <br /> <br />But rather than accept their inevitable displacement or even expiration, novels respond by incorporating, using or refusing new media. Certain texts that exhibit an awareness of twenty-first-century media have done so while intervening in global political conditions, mobilizing the form of the novel while incorporating visual media as part of their narrative and representational approaches. Texts by authors including Ruth Ozeki and NoViolet Bulawayo, among many others, render our new media environments an issue of world politics. Other authors, such as Jonathan Safran Foer and Ali Smith, respond to our media-rich environment by exploring new storytelling potential within the medium of the book, their stories often hinging on the materiality of the object in the reader’s hands. <br /> <br />This seminar invites reflection on the capacity of novels to narrativize, use, or otherwise represent the contemporary media ecology. We welcome papers that address the following questions or pursue any related lines of inquiry: <br /> <br /> - How do novels represent concerns of digitization, “informatization,” big data, and new media ecologies? <br /> - How does the materiality of the book—or the materiality of information—become a resource for invention and innovation in a digital age? <br /> - How do global novels contend with an expanding media environment, now constituted by old media forms (print, film, photography, radio) as well as newer media (Internet content such as blogs, email, video games, SMS)—an environment which is inherently global in nature? <br /> - Are new forms such as electronic literature, the hypertextual novel, and print/digital hybrids fundamentally superseding the form of the print novel, or is there more to be said about the respective places that all of these forms might hold in our culturally mediated future? <br /> - Might concepts such as “world literature” or “global literature” provide a strong conceptual foundation for considering literature’s relationship to digital media? <br /> - Given the novel’s capacity for generic cross-pollination, how can the form incorporate adjacent media in addressing global conditions such as poverty, war, migration, or inequality, which are by nature difficult to apprehend, represent, or visualize? <br /> - What theoretical approaches might prove useful in analyzing the increasingly complex imbrications of verbal literature, visual media, and global politics? <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts through the ACLA online portal, which opens September 1 and closes at 12am PST on September 23rd: http://www.acla.org/node/add/paper. Submitters are advised, also, to familiarize themselves with the unique structure of the ACLA conference by visiting http://www.acla.org/annual-meeting. Please contact the seminar organizers with questions or concerns.

Conference Location: Cambridge, MA, United States
Conference Starts: March 17, 2016
Conference Ends: March 20, 2016

CFP Submission Deadline: September 23, 2015

For more information, contact: Jap-Nanak Makkar

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Modernities in the Americas (1910-1970)


Readdressing the question of modernity today, whether from the perspective of its literary, artistic, social or political inscriptions, amounts to using a plural designation and along with it a specific chronology. What modernity implies is that the concept of the modern be not limited to the diverse and often ambiguous meanings of the term modernism. “Modernity is not a movement, such as dada or imagism. If literary history decides that some movement, English or Spanish, is to be called modernism, the term immediately takes on a technical sense. It becomes stabilized. Its participation in modernity becomes merely fragmentary” (Henri Meschonnic, Modernité modernité). <br /> The aim of this symposium will be to re-evaluate a multi-faceted and multilingual phenomenon across the whole cultural spectrum of the Americas, in constant interaction with Europe and with other regions of the world. Our concern will be neither to provide an entirely exhaustive nor specifically objective study, but to draw out the key features of the modern and the anti-modern in particular, either individually or in opposition to one another. “In the name of artistic radicalism and the concept of rupture” we “have set aside or chosen not to highlight a number of individual or collective expressions deemed hybrid, local, late or anti-modern” (Catherine Grenier, "Le monde à l’envers ?", Centre Georges Pompidou), and the same is true in areas other than art. In literature in particular, « only what is ancient has a chance at being modern or announcing modernity » (Pascale Casanova, La république mondiale des lettres). From this has stemmed the systematic search for ancestors of the modern in places as far removed as so-called « primitive » or indigenous societies. What is deemed « barbaric » or crude often appears more modern than civilization, as long as we refrain from folklore. A certain kind of realism is sometimes more modern than a form of anti-realism or « magic realism » that have been declared avant-garde. There is also the classicism of the modern , the product of its own repetiton » (Meschonnic). <br /> The undeniable differences but also coincidences between the Americas, whether anglophone, francophone, hispanophone or lusophone will undoubtedly bring to light the specific and common characteristics of each cultural area as well as their inner contradictory aesthetic and cultural decisions during the period stretching from 1910 to 1970, namely after Art Nouveau and after the invention of the « postmodern condition » (Jean-François Lyotard, La condition postmoderne : Rapport sur le savoir). Lines of inquiry such as those concentrating on « exchanges between high culture and popular culture, the center and the periphery, formal research and social relevancy » (Gauthier) should allow for a thorough mapping of modernity along continental scales. <br /> <br />Abstracts are welcome in French, English, Spanish or Portuguese. Deadline for abstracts : May 1, 2015. <br />Please send a 300-word abstract, along with a short biography, to all four members of the organizing committee. <br />Hélène Aji, Université Paris-Ouest Nanterre-La Défense, helene.aji@u-paris10.fr <br />Maria Graciete Besse, Université Paris-Sorbonne maria-graciete.besse@paris-sorbonne.fr <br />Paul-Henri Giraud, Université de Lille 3 Sciences humaines et sociales, paul-henri.giraud@univ-lille3.fr <br />Fiona McMahon, Université de Bourgogne, Fiona.McMahon@u-bourgogne.fr <br /> <br />Plenary Speakers  <br /> <br />Smaro Kamboureli (University of Toronto, Canada) <br />Bill Mohr (California State University, Long Beach, Ca, USA) <br />Claudio Cledson Novaes (Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Brazil) <br />Erica Segre (Trinity College, Cambridge, UK)  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Dijon, France
Conference Starts: November 18, 2015
Conference Ends: November 20, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2015

For more information, contact: Helene AJI

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MSA 17: Rethinking Modernism and the First World


MSA 17, Boston. I am trying to put together a last-minute panel on modernism and the First World War. The board has agreed to accept panel proposals by the original deadline of 1 May. <br /> <br />In his seminal article “Modernity and Revolution” Perry Anderson claims that “the imaginative proximity of social revolution” is conducive to the modernist aesthetic. Rather than addressing the prospect of socio-political change in the work of modernism, this panel is interested in the actual encounter between modernism and conflict. It asks whether and how the early twentieth-century experimentation with modernist forms and ideas could be (or was indeed) retained in light of the outbreak of the First World War. Many have argued that this was not the case. The meeting that Charles Masterman convened in early September 1914 to recruit leading Edwardian authors in the war effort (among them Bennett, Bridges, Hardy) set the tone for how the conflict was to be written at home. In the literature generated on both fronts, Paul Fussell argues, traditional and technically prudent literary conventions persisted. But where were the modernists? What work has been done within the field of modernism studies to address this question mainly focuses on the impact of the conflict on the oeuvre of the canonical high modernists of the 1920s. Taking its cue from Vincent Sherry’s The Great War and the Language of Modernism, this panel seeks to relate contemporary modernism to the context of the period 1914-1918. It especially aims to extend Sherry’s argument by exploring the work (both literature and journalism) of modernists in the army. These may include T.E. Hulme, Wyndham Lewis, John Dos Passos, Ford Madox Ford, Ernest Hemingway, Richard Aldington, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, C.R.W. Nevinson or Mary Borden. <br /> <br />This panel is interested in contributions on the relationship of contemporary modernism and the First World War; on modernist experimentation in war literature as well as trench journals and hospital magazines, war ephemera, film and paintings by official war artists; on how the representation of war experiences might demand modernist forms (fragmentation, time out of joint etc.); on the idea of both modernism and WWI as 'states of exception'; on the fate of individual modernists in the army (institutional authority); on the relationship of war poetry and its avant-garde precursors, especially Imagism; and, generally, on the reconsideration of canonical war writing (the likes of Owen and Sassoon) in the development of literary modernism. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words and a short scholarly bio to Cedric.VanDijck@UGent.be by April 30. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2015

For more information, contact: Cedric Van Dijck

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Figures of revolution in visual art and culture (MSA17)


Talk of revolution in the visual arts very often registers today as a worn-out cliché, inhabiting the same territory as the talk of 'movements', 'ruptures', and 'radical shifts' that sustains so many discourses on art, whether categorized as 'contemporary' or 'modern'. Yet is it possible to think not so much of the rhetoric of revolution in art history (and related fields), but rather of the figurations and political configurations of revolution in and beyond what we name 'art'? Do revolutions need art, or a visual form, to take shape? If, as curator Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev has contended, we may speak of a revolutionary 'energy and potential latent in forms themselves', how would this potential in art come into contact with a revolutionary politics? What would a materialist account of the figures and forms of revolution look like? The motif of the vortex in Russian Constructivism, or the irruptive presence of digital media in the 2011 Egyptian revolution, are perhaps examples of such figures and configurations. Papers are invited that approach these questions from a variety of historical, critical, and theoretical perspectives. Please send abstract (approximately 200-250 words) and short bio to morgan.thomas@uc.edu by April 16.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2015

For more information, contact: Morgan Thomas

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Policing Revolutions (MSA 17)


Policing Revolutions <br /> <br />Policing in England underwent massive formal and ideological changes in the period between 1880 and 1921. These included the introduction of a plain-clothes detective service, the modernization of police methods and training, and the development of a “Special Branch” within the Metropolitan police to deal with the perceived threat posed by continental and home-grown anarchists, Home Rule bombings, and women’s suffrage agitation before the war, as well as the demands made by foreign governments on the Metropolitan police’s resources. Likewise, the years immediately preceding World War I saw significant de facto expansions of police power and the beginning of the first clandestine police service in England proper, MI5. Simultaneously, this period also saw an increased interest in writing by and about detectives, beginning with Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and culminating in a spate of memoirs written by former detectives in the late 20s and early 30s. This panel proposes to examine the relationship between the revolution in policing methodologies and representations of policing during this period. <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br />• Representations of policing in fiction <br />• Policing as a topic of public and/or parliamentary debate <br />• Policing and mass political movements <br />• Policing Home Rule activism in England <br />• Policing and protest <br />• The detective memoir as a genre <br />• Political movements in the detective memoir <br />• The influence of policing in/of the Empire on policing “at home” in England <br />• Theorizing the policeman/British policing as biopolitics <br />• Policing and class <br />• Policing and gender <br />• Englishness, the role of the “political police” and/or resistance to “the French model” in public debates surrounding detective work <br />• The bobby in the popular imagination <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 200-250 words and a short bio to Steph Brown (stephbrown@email.arizona.edu) by April 16. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2015

For more information, contact: Steph Brown

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Queer Modernisms and Justice


<br />Queer Modernisms and Justice <br /> <br />This panel is interested in looking at the kinds of ethical interventions queer modernisms make, or refuse. New modernist studies has given us a more plural notion of what constitutes modernist innovation and style, recognizing "low" modernisms, "bad" modernisms, Black modernisms, female modernisms, and queer modernisms as deliciously disruptive and unsettling. Implicit in most arguments about the value of these so-called "peripheral" modernisms is the notion that the transformative, revolutionary disruptiveness of modernist diversity constitutes some kind of engagement with justice. Does it? Iris Marion Young has defined the “responsibility for justice,” as one where evaluating our participation in “structures of privilege and disadvantage, constraint and enablement” allows us to assume responsibility for the effect of those structures on others. This panel asks whether queer modernism, one of those peripheral modernisms concerned with intersecting representations of sexuality, gender, race, class, and able-bodiedness, is invested in the responsibility for justice, how and where that responsibility is realized, if at all, and what particularly about modernist sexual and gender queerness makes its engagement with justice necessary and important (or not). <br /> <br />Papers might address affect, comportment, disability, sport, eugenics, socialism, fascism, censorship, trials and hearings, violence, racism, and subcultures, among other things. <br /> <br />Please send a short bio and abstract of no more than 250 words to Jaime Hovey by April 16. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2015

For more information, contact: Jaime Hovey

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Black-Boxing Modernism (MSA 17)


The "black box" thought experiment offers a model for understanding communication that recognizes the fundamental blindness of any observer to the internal mechanisms at work in its objects of study and external interlocutors. From a black box perspective, blindness and ignorance motivate the drive to develop creative means of understanding input-output reactions—of identifying patterns of communication despite persistent uncertainty. Clerk Maxwell originally theorized the black box in the nineteenth century, and W. Ross Ashby brought it to prominence in his 1956 Introduction to Cybernetics. How might the distinct relationship the black box establishes between knowledge and ignorance, observation and opacity, transmission and confusion, though, also speak to modernist textuality and communication practice? <br /> <br />This CFP seeks proposals for papers that read modernist literary or cultural texts in conversation with the black-box concept. Angles of approach might consider black boxes in terms of: communication technology; information culture; literary form; subjectivity and relationships; limitations on perception. <br /> <br />Please send a short (3-5 sentences is fine) proposal and brief bio to halove@indiana.edu by April 16, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2015

For more information, contact: Heather Love

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Traveling Domestic: Modernism


Guiliana Bruno’s Atlas of Emotion: Journeys in Art, Architecture and Film (2002), introduces the idea of “traveling domestic” in art and film. For Bruno, “traveling domestic” involves seeing and representing the home not as the static antithesis of travel but as a space that itself engenders voyage and invites exploration; to “travel domestic” is to approach the home as curious and risky rather than banal and safe. This type of travel holds special significance for considerations of gender both because it is staged within a stereotypically feminine sphere and because it unsettles the home’s ability to function as a bulwark against turbulent public space. <br /> <br />As a concept, “traveling domestic” can provide useful critical traction for considering modernism’s numerous modes of contesting ideals of private space or unsettling notions of domestic intimacy. To “travel domestic,” might involve entering the surreal portals hidden behind the apartment doors of Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel’s Un Chien Andalou (1929), confronting the threat of domestic objects and architecture in the case of Maya Deren’s Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), or it might involve an aesthetic valuation of everydayness as in Charles and Ray Eames’ House After Five Years of Living (1955). To take a more literary approach, “traveling domestic” might involve witnessing time pass in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, picking through Jenny Petherbridge’s collectables in Djuna Barnes’ Nightwood, or entering the large sumptuous interiors of East and West Egg mansions in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. <br /> <br />This panel asks how modernist representations of “traveling domestic” identify and configure private space as an epicenter of political and artistic change. How do these representations seek to undo, challenge, or rewrite relationships between public and private, interior and exterior, and the gendered identifications accompanying these? How does “traveling domestic” change over the course of the twentieth century and how is this reflective of modernism’s larger aesthetic and political transformations? Papers might also take up the idea of traveling domestic with respect to questions of genre—how do modernist ideas of “traveling domestic” manipulate or rewrite generic conventions of melodrama (to give one example)? <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words, a short scholarly bio, and AV requirements to algreen@msu.edu by April 15.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 21, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Anna Green

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Wharton/Hemingway Collection


Call for Essays for an Edited Collection on Edith Wharton and Ernest Hemingway <br /> <br />Contributors are sought for a proposed collection of essays on Edith Wharton and Ernest Hemingway, tentatively titled Architects of American Modernism: Wharton and Hemingway. Louisiana State University Press has expressed interest in this project and asked to review a full proposal. <br /> <br />Edith Wharton and Ernest Hemingway have a great deal in common: They were both American modernist writers who lived as expatriates in Paris. They were both active in World War I well before the U.S. declared war. Both wrote in a range of genres, including novels, short fiction, drama, travel writing, and magazine journalism, and they shared a publisher, Scribner’s. Both wrote novels that became bestsellers, and both won the Pulitzer Prize. Hemingway owned six of Wharton’s books and mentioned her in a letter, while Wharton belittled his books in her private writing and in a letter once openly mocked the Americans who frequented the cafes of Montparnasse. <br /> <br />While scholars have already agreed to contribute essays on a host of topics (including World War I, expatriate modernism, Biblical allusion, architecture/interior decoration, the New Woman, masculinity, the short story, and international celebrity), topics on which I would particularly like to see proposals include the following: <br /> <br />Wharton and Hemingway in Africa (_In Morocco_ and _Green Hills of Africa_, _Under Kilimanjaro_, and the two African short stories) <br />Teaching Wharton and Hemingway <br />Wharton and Hemingway and Italy <br />Wharton and Hemingway and France <br />Wharton and Hemingway and medicine <br />Wharton and Hemingway and Scribners (the publisher) <br />Wharton and Hemingway and Scribner’s (the magazine) <br />Wharton and Hemingway and the Pulitzer Prize <br />Wharton and Hemingway and anti-Semitism <br /> <br />Other proposed topics are also welcome! <br /> <br />The ideal length for essays would be about 20-25 pages. <br /> <br />Those interested should contact Lisa Tyler, professor of English at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio, at lisa.tyler_@_sinclair.edu, (937) 512-2250, or English Department, Sinclair Community College, 444 West Third St., Dayton, OH 45402, with a 500-word proposal and a biographical paragraph. <br /> <br />Deadline for proposals is April 15, 2015. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Edited Collection, USA
Conference Starts: February 17, 2015
Conference Ends: April 15, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Lisa Tyler

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Anarchist Modernism (MSA 17)


In keeping with the conference's theme of "€œmodernism & revolution,"€ this panel will explore convergences, transactions, and collaborations between modernist art and the theory and practice of anarchism. <br /> <br />Of the early years of modernism, Raymond Williams has said in the "The Politics of the Avant-garde" that "€œthere was a clear initial linkage between the assault on existing conventions and the programmes of anarchists, nihilists, and revolutionary socialists. The deep emphasis on the liberation of the creative individual took many toward the anarchist wing." More recent work has grown around many modernist figures and submovements for which anarchists were vital sources of intellectual exchange. It has become clear that French literary and visual avant-gardes as movements inextricably connected to the activity of anarchist groups and newspapers. Some work has been done in the past decade on Dora Marsden, the anarcho-feminist publisher whose journals, including The New Freewoman and The Egoist, focused on topics in anarchist theory at the same time that they published monumental works of literary modernism. Related work has examined how an anarchist milieu affected Joyce, Pound, and other figures in Marsden'€™s circles. Emma Goldman produced a journal focusing on radical politics and art called The Blast, virtually sharing a name with Pound and Lewis'€™s more famous project. <br /> <br />Williams insisted that the October Revolution of 1917 forced modernists artists into a choice between fascist and Communist politics, but since then modernist studies has examined the ways in which radicals outside a strictly Communist framework continued to be fascinated by modernist technique well beyond the advent of the USSR. This panel then, centers on how anarchist emphases on anti-traditionalism and creative individualism may have found their way into the aesthetic programs of artists working within the tradition of literary and visual modernism. Since anarchism is a philosophy rooted in overturning traditional structures, the panel will consider proposals from across disciplinary, chronological, and national boundaries. <br /> <br />Please send 300 word abstract, AV requirements, and a brief CV to Michael O'€™Bryan at mbobryan@wustl.edu by April 15th. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Michael O'Bryan

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CFP MSA 2015: The Modernist Rebellions of H.D. and/or Her Circle


The study of H.D., the many other modernist figures in her orbit, and the many modes in which she worked has often focused on aesthetic revolution (language, form, genre) and cultural revolutions (gender/sexuality, and lately national identity). This panel seeks to build on and expand the revolutionary frame by inviting papers that either re-evaluate this existing terrain or shed new light on H.D. and/or her circle by considering transformations in technology, science, media, culture, translation, notions of history or of the everyday, and/or in particular literary movements or genres. Each paper ideally will thus link H.D. and/or those in her circle to at least one other modernist phenomenon. Send brief bios and 500 word abstracts by April 15 to Celena Kusch (ckusch@uscupstate.edu). <br /> <br />The 2015 MSA Conference will be held in Boston, Nov. 19-22, 2015. For more information, see: https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa17/CFP.html

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: CELENA KUSCH

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Modernist Disassociations


Modernist Disassociations <br /> <br />Characterized by avant-garde alliances, groupuscules, collectives, salons, magazines, manifestos, mergers and ruptures, the modernisms of the first half of the 20th century were an associative affair. The exemplary “Moderns,” however eclectic a group, joined in revolt against the forms and pieties of the 19th-century, spurring aesthetic innovations and energizing modernity’s political, cultural, and technological revolutions. <br /> <br />But what about those who, whether by choice, ignorance, or circumstance, disassociate? What does it mean to be a dropout, dissenter, or dilettante who is estranged from or a stranger to modernism? In order to broach these and other questions, this panel seeks papers on writers, artists, and musicians whose work, intentionally or not, snubs groupthink, possibly turning against the progressive, political, technological and revolutionary attitudes we tend to associate with modernism. <br /> <br />Papers might address: <br />-Notions of anti-modernism, noncommitment, being apolitical <br />-Acts of disavowal or demission vis-à-vis a larger goal or project <br />-Figures of dilettantism, unproductivity, inaction, or backwardness in relation to modernism <br />-Technophobia or anti-materialism (in all senses of the term) <br />-Failure, inadequacy, loneliness, and impotence <br />-Lack of context and alternative methodologies for reading modernism <br /> <br />Please submit a 300 word proposal to asd323@nyu.edu before April 15th, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Andrew Dubrov

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Revolutionary Little Magazines (MSA 17)


MSA 17 Modernism & Revolution <br />Panel: Revolutionary Little Magazines <br /> <br />In keeping with the conference theme of Modernism & Revolution, this panel seeks to explore modernism's little magazines as sites of provocation and revolt. The magazine communities were hotbeds of controversial figures and politics, and their publications challenged national programs and social mores via radical ideologies and aesthetics. Of particular interest to this panel is the interplay between their innovative experimental aesthetics and their cultural, social, and political interests that included socialism, anarchy, feminism, women's suffrage, sex, race, nationalism, militarization and labor. Panel papers might focus on The Crisis, The Dial, The Freewoman, The Little Review, The Messenger, The Others, The Liberator, to name a few. With their challenging forms and content, these magazines were immediately responsive to, and in dialogue with, the movements and zeitgeists of their time and place, actively shaping and creating revolutionary conversations. <br /> <br />Typical of the provocative character of the little magazines, the Little Review editors, Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap, who always invited controversy, advertised their transcultural magazine as one of Art and Revolution: “there is no revolution unless it is born of the same spirit which produces real art." Endlessly and intentionally aggravating the American public, this magazine, spearheaded by two queer women, often had issues burned by the U.S. Post Office; when taken to court on obscenity charges for publishing a sexually explicit section of Ulysses, their issue that blasted censorship of art featured the poetry and photographs of transgressive female avant-gardists. Always entangled with the law, The Masses was described as the most dangerous magazine in America: it housed modernist writing and promoted radical positions on unionization, racial equality, birth control, and free love. The Crisis was overseen by W.E.B. Du Bois and editor Jessie Fauset and was associated with the newly formed NAACP; a seminal periodical on race and social injustice in America, it showcased African-American arts alongside graphic journalistic accounts of discrimination and lynchings. <br /> <br />This panel is interested in papers on the relationship of form and content in particular little magazines; on aesthetic and political agendas; on what kinds of lines were crossed in a particular magazine and issue; on the politics of the crossing of (genre, national, social, cultural, gender, race) lines; on the implications of mixing and congregating disparate genres, forms, figures, languages, voices, images as a revolutionary formal response and means to confront, unsettle, challenge and instigate. <br /> <br />Please send an approximately 400 word abstract and short bio or CV to Adrienne Walser at awalser@bard.edu by Wednesday, April 15th, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, United States of America
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Adrienne Walser

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Modernism and Security (MSA 17)


The field of security studies generally takes the National Security Act of 1947 as its beginning, but one could argue that in a US context modern forms of security date back at least to the period immediately following the Civil War, at a time when the industrial working class grew and began to organize, a flood of new immigrants entered the country, and the previous impulse for westward expansion began to turn its gaze toward Central and South America. This panel therefore seeks to understand security as a modern form before its Cold War incarnation, and papers dealing with any aspect of its history, its representation, or its various contexts prior to 1947 are welcome. Examples of possible topics include, among others: the birth of modern police forces; the emergence of private security firms such as the Pinkertons; the development of the OSS during WWII; the growth of US "influence" in Central and South America; the various forms of resistance that confronted emerging forms of security, such as labor struggles at Haymarket, Homestead, or Ludlow, and the tactics of "outlaws" in the western states and territories. Topics might focus on any scope of interest, from the local to the international. The topics above suggest an American emphasis, but those pertaining to British or other global contexts are certainly welcome. <br /> <br />Please email brief proposals (a few sentences outlining your intended focus will be fine) to michael.swacha@duke.edu no later than April 15th. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Michael Swacha

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The Rhetoric of Revolution


The Rhetoric of Revolution <br /> <br />The theme for MSA’s 17th annual convention is "revolution." The articulation of revolution is of particular interest here – manners of expression and mediums of the propagation of “revolution” in any form offer insight and new avenues into the modern era. This CFP seeks proposals that explore revolutionary rhetoric in the early twentieth century: gender, political, scientific, socio-cultural, racial, artistic, print/media, and literary. Interdisciplinary approaches strongly encouraged. Please send proposal and 3 sentence bio to heather.lusty@unlv.edu by April 15th, 2015. <br /> <br />https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa17/ <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

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Re: the 1916 Rising: Revivalism, Republicanism, Remembrance


The Irish 1916 Rising presents fascinating intersections between cultural, literary, and political revolutions. As the “Poets’ Rebellion” moniker indicates, the authors of the Rising were poets and political revolutionaries, as well as key activists in the Gaelic and literary revivals. Papers on the “re” prefix as it recurs in revolutionary and revivalist rhetoric and in commemorative events are especially welcome. The 2016 centennial offers an occasion to reflect on the discourse surrounding 1916, and on the controversies over commemorating the event in 1966.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Laura O'Connor

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The Modernist Bildungsroman


In Unseasonable Youth (2011), Jed Esty suggests that the “modernist pressure on bildungsroman conventions goes beyond raising the possibility that the genre can no longer serve those functions” of representing modernity and middle-class identity: “it also raises the possibility that it never did.” Esty’s claim (and other related recent work) challenges us to reexamine the modernist engagement with the tradition of the bildungsroman genre—and to ask just how revolutionary that engagement really was. <br /> <br />This panel welcomes papers that deal with the “modernist bildungsroman” broadly construed. Some questions that might be considered: is there a tradition of modernist bildungsroman writing? What aspects of the socio-historical environment of modernism should be reconsidered in the light of that genre? Is modernism itself a story of development/education, or if not, how not? Most importantly, how do different perspectives on or treatments of the classic bildungsroman form (gender, race, sexuality) suggest new ways of approaching the genre? <br /> <br />Papers on single authors/works and broader theoretical discussions of the genre will both be considered. Please send a 300 word abstract and a CV or short bio to Matthew Burroughs Price at mbprice@psu.edu by April 14, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2015

For more information, contact: Matthew Burroughs Price

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Modernism in the Green


For all its many urban topographies, the literary landscape of modernism contains a startling array of greens, from public and national parks to vacant lots, suburban gardens, and botanic displays. In drawing from recent interactions between environmental criticism and modernist studies, we propose that thinking with and through planned greens leads to a more complex understanding of modernism’s tangled engagements with arts, social protest, material culture, bodies, and the nature-culture divide. What new haptic, scopic or visual modes of experience were enabled when modernism entered the green? How were gendered and sexualized bodies redistributed? How was imperial ideology grafted together with colonial aspirations? What new visions of work and play are staged in the green? How do we reconsider modernism’s urban character when viewed from the green? <br />We welcome abstracts that explore modernist engagement with various planned green spaces as embodiments of new aesthetic principles, emergent political desires, disciplinary anxieties, and shifting cultural assumptions about nature during the first half of the 20th century. We especially welcome contributions that address diverse modes of textual production like pamphlets, guidebooks, brochures, and postcards or which reroute modernist genealogies through new global, transnational or localist excursions. <br /> <br />Please submit 300-word abstracts and a brief bio to co-organizers Margaret Konkol (New College of Florida) and Julia Daniel (Baylor University) by April 14th.

Conference Location: Boston, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2015

For more information, contact: Margaret Konkol

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Modernism and the Literature of Ecological Limit


<br /> <br />This panel situates the modernist period between two of the transformations in environmental history: the industrial revolution and the birth of the contemporary environmental movement in the 1960s. If the former exponentially increased the pressure humans can put on the environment and the latter represents the first serious attempt to limit that pressure, what came in between? How did writers of the early twentieth century express anxiety or concern about the ecological impacts of their rapidly urbanizing, industrializing societies? How did they contend with the political and ethical systems of their era that encouraged uninhibited growth? How did Modernist tropes feed into the beginnings of the environmental movement, or how might Modernism and contemporary environmentalism represent opposing world views? <br /> <br />Possible topics include (but of course aren't limited to): <br />-minimalism and the ego <br />-modernism’s relationship to the machine, especially the major innovations of the period <br />-resource rebellions <br />-austerity, rationing, and consumption patterns <br />-urbanization and the environment <br />-ecologies of colonialism/post-colonialism/globalization <br />-20th century land use, the Dustbowl and depression, agricultural/green revolution <br />-rural and vernacular Modernisms <br />-literature of mass production <br />-environmental impacts of war <br /> <br />Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief biographical note by April 14 to Austin Hetrick at ah2af@virginia.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2015

For more information, contact: Austin Hetrick

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Precursors to Modernism's Revolutions


The Call for Papers for MSA 17 states that the MSA 17 title, “Modernism and Revolution…invokes characterizations of modernism as a revolutionary movement across the arts, as a revolt against tradition, and as a renovation of literature, performance, visual arts, and culture more generally.” But every revolution has its precursors. The revolution of modernism is itself a movement of multiple revolutions, all of which have these precursors. From the Harlem Renaissance to vorticism, the revolutions of modernism have grown out of complex and specific historical, literary and artistic circumstances. This panel seeks papers that discuss these precursors to modernism’s revolutions. <br /> <br />Papers for this panel might address the development of any one or more of modernism’s revolutions, including but not limited to, the Harlem Renaissance, vorticism, cubism, futurism, etc. Papers might address theoretical arguments of the development of modernism as revolution; technological advancements in and around the modernist period and their effect on modernism’s revolutions; or racial, gender, or sexual relations in the modernist period and the development of related revolutions. The driving questions of this panel will be: what can we learn about the revolutions of modernism by looking at their precursors? What values (historical, cultural, aesthetic) are at stake in highlighting or obscuring the prehistory of modernist revolutions? Finally, how do the precursors to modernist revolutions help us to continue to excavate important histories of race, gender, and sexuality in the modern period? <br /> <br />Abstracts of 200-300 words can be sent to Jeremy Carnes at jcarnes@uwm.edu by Monday, April 13. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 13, 2015

For more information, contact: Jeremy Carnes

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Modernism and Cinema: Genealogies of Rupture (MSA 17)


This CFP invites paper abstracts for a panel on modernism and cinema for the upcoming Modernist Studies Association conference in Boston. With this year's MSA conference focusing on the theme of modernism and revolution, this panel will consider the revolution of the motion picture (as emergent media technology, popular cultural formation, aesthetic mode, social and recreational practice) in relation to literary modernism broadly conceived. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to explore the degree to which modernism and cinema's mutual histories and intersections have been contingent upon the notion of rupture. How have genealogies of film-and-literature relations relied on, as well as troubled, ideas of rupture and revolution when drawing out the connections between literary texts and cinematic media during the modernist period? Such connections may encompass formal innovations and experiments across media, new epistemological models of perception and vision articulated in print and visual modes, changes in authorial and textual conventions, conditions of narrative continuity and discontinuity, modernist writers' growing aesthetic and commercial interests in motion pictures, and the blurring of cultural hierarchies within and across art forms. <br /> <br />Additionally, we can reflect on the limitations of centering these intermedial histories on such issues of rupture and pose alternatives. Have the rubrics of rupture and revolution at times simplified our understanding of modernist style and its links to the cinema? How might the complex processes of intermedial contact, translation, tension, and negotiation also usefully frame our view of modernism's interactions with film? In tackling these concerns, this panel seeks to identify some of the gaps in the existing scholarship on modernism and cinema and to rethink the relationship between literary culture and screen media. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Yair Solan at ysolan@gradcenter.cuny.edu by April 13, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 13, 2015

For more information, contact: Yair Solan

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Remote Control: Modernism's Surveillances (MSA 17)


This panel investigates the relationship between global modernism and surveillance by studying how new optical technologies developed during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries engaged with changing conceptions of embodiment, self-perception, subjectivity and virtuality in ways that continue to resonate with contemporary concerns over remote monitoring. The present-day explosion of surveillance mechanisms across the planet, such as drones, body scanners, CCTV, webcams, dataveillance tools and biometric devices; alongside automated forms of inter-personal interaction (telemedicine, robot caregivers) raise new questions surrounding privacy, identity, self-regulation and the reach of disciplinary power in the operations of daily life. Writers such as Foucault, Debord, and Baudrillard have stressed the importance of the disciplinary apparatus and its uncanny ability to both permeate and constitute the perceiving subject, in part through the flow of commodities. By contrast, modernism has often been seen as undoing these forms of control, engaging in an anarchic or revolutionary overthrow of norms in the scopic regime. Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer and the Frankfurt School's critiques are paradigmatic in this regard. Yet these critiques also highlight the liminal position of the modern subject: at once observing and observed by the surrounding world. <br /> <br />We invite proposals that explore modernism's fraught, multidimensional relationship to surveillance around the world, whether in literature, literary theory, visual culture, film studies or the performing arts. At what points and to what ends does modernism establish its own rituals and technologies of observation? How are these articulated? Are there ways in which modernism thinks surveillance outside the domain of optical power relations? Or is the human gaze always already inscribed in the system of visual prosthetics? What is the relationship between modernism, surveillance and the development of the concept of the human machine? Of particular interest are papers that take into account a hemispheric, transnational, post-colonial or global approach and that place modernism in conversation with contemporary surveillance practices worldwide. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional biography (2-3 sentences) to Cate Reilly at cireilly@princeton.edu by April 13. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 13, 2015

For more information, contact: Cate Reilly

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Rude Mechanicals: Modernist Poetry and Mechanical Technologies (MSA 17)


In this panel we will investigate the relationship of modernist poetry and mechanical technologies. Modernity can be characterized by revolutions in technology that bring about greater sophistication in its machines: the overlapping innovations in the technologies of industrial production, war, media, infrastructure, science and medicine, and more. The modern era arguably begins with the photograph and the telegraph and ends with digital photograph and the smartphone. <br /> <br />Modernist poets attended to these revolutionary innovations in various ways. Marianne Moore tells an interviewer that she is "€œpreoccupied...fundamentally and continuously"€ by them, emphasizing technology as subject matter. Yet mechanical technologies also inform how modernist poets describe their art, as when William Carlos Williams famously writes: "€œA poem is a small (or large) machine made out of words."€ Ezra Pound theorizes poetry as "€œmachine art"; Marshall McLuhan, corresponding with Pound, writes: "Also I'm interested in such analogies with modern poetry as that provided by the vacuum tube." And of course, such technologies shape how modern poetry circulates. New recording machines disseminate the poet'€™s voice and create new and different sensations of poetry'€™s immediacy. Material text production also becomes more immediate; the increasing use of typewriters and duplicating machines during the first half of the century culminates in the so-called "€œmimeograph revolution"€ production of 1960s and later, which builds upon and modifies modernism'€™s little magazine exchange networks. <br /> <br />We invite proposals on the engagement of modernist poetry with mechanical technologies, whether as subject matter, as poetic technique, or as it shaped the circulation and reception of texts. Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief biographical note by April 12 to Stephanie Anderson at sra3@uchicago.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 12, 2015

For more information, contact: Stephanie Anderson

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Modernism and History (MSA 17)


From the early decades of the twentieth century the concept of '€˜revolution'€™ has provided modernism with a powerful historical imaginary of rupture and change, encompassing phenomena ranging from overtly political manifestos through to radical challenges to established aesthetic forms and prevailing critical frameworks. Taking our cue from this year's theme, this session seeks to rethink modernism'€™s broader relationship to categories and modes of the historical. We invite papers that both broaden and complicate current understandings of the interrelation between conceptions of history and modernist artistic practice. Modernist figurations that might come under scrutiny include visions of historical experience as nightmare; belatedness; anticipation; everydayness and banality; concepts of the residual and of foreclosure; the phantasmagoric; spaces of memory and trauma, the museum and the slaughterhouse. <br /> <br />The panel will consider - but is not limited to - questions such as: What is the status of the historical 'event'€™ in modernism and what conception of history does it presuppose? How does the modernist obsession with the moment reflect a complex negotiation with the past and the future? How does modernism intervene in contemporaneous philosophies of history, and what are its lessons for historicism today? What visions of history do modernist historical novels offer, and how do they shift the parameters of the genre, either as a popular form or as the realist form par excellence, valorized by Georg Lukacs? What radical new forms of historicity emerge from the modernist engagement with contemporaneous philosophy, psychology, and politics? How can we analyze the history of modernism beyond the great divide between rupture and continuity? How does artistic form, whether experimental or established, produce particular historical sensibilities? How do major nodes of modernist engagement and estrangement - sensory perception, concepts of experience, media technologies -€“ speak to concepts of history and to the possibilities of historical experience? <br /> <br />Please send a 50-word bio, title, and abstract (250 words maximum) to avg212@nyu.edu by April 12.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 12, 2015

For more information, contact: Adrienne Ghaly, Aleks Prigozhin

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The Opposites of Modernism (MSA 17)


In keeping with the conference theme of revolution, this panel will consider one of the necessary preconditions for revolution: opposition. The idea of opposition is central to the concept of Modernism because Modernism is so often characterized as uniting antithetical notions. To offer only a few examples, Modernism is regularly described as being old and new, objective and subjective, timely and timeless, conservative and progressive, coherent and fragmented. This panel will explore the oppositions inherent in the notion of Modernism by examining Modernist works that represent and dramatize those oppositions. The depiction of the opposition may be carried out through character, narrative, image or allusion. The papers in this panel will ask three essential questions of each opposition that is examined: How is the opposition defined? What is the relationship between the two opposites? Is the difference between the two opposites mediated or does the opposition prove to be irreconcilable? This panel welcomes papers on topics in literature, the visual and performing arts, literary theory and philosophy. Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Robert Baines at rb211@evansville.edu by April 10.

Conference Location: Boston, MA, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Robert Baines

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Poetry &amp; Revolution (MSA 17)


Forty-one years after the publication of Julia Kristeva's landmark theoretical intervention in modernist studies, _La révolution du langage poétique_, this panel proposes, following the conference theme, Modernism and Revolution, to reconsider the relationship of poetry to revolution, whether considered in terms of what happens within the language, the text's revolutionary effects, or its commitment to a wider revolutionary agenda. Does poetry promise what Arthur Rimbaud heralds as "étonnantes révolutions de l'amour" ["amazing revolutions of love"], or should it, acquiescing to W.H. Auden's dictum, concede that indeed it "makes nothing happen" and humble itself, surviving only as "[a] way of happening, a mouth"? <br /> <br />Papers are welcome dealing with modern poetry in any language, though translations should be provided for non-English texts. While presenters need not refer to Kristeva or psychoanalytic approaches to literature, they should reach beyond individual poems to address larger theoretical and political concerns. Of particular interest are innovative readings that put poems into critical dialogue with contemporary cultural theory. <br /> <br />The question of revolution should be construed neither as limited to experiments in poetic form, nor as solely concerned with global social transformation, but includes efforts to revolutionize relations within society, such as those of sexuality, gender, gender identity and expression, race, class, and disability. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 500 words to m-cole@wiu.edu.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Merrill Cole

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Literature and the Cold War


The literary focus of the Cold War was recently brought into view. New documents released by the CIA reveal a covert book print program surrounding the translation, publication, printing and distribution of Boris Pasternak's Dr Zhivago banned in Russia and Eastern Europe. A Wilson Center History panel, The Marshall Plan of the Mind: the CIA Covert Book Program, sketched the soft power battle to win the minds of the East Europeans and Russians through distribution of Dr. Zhivago in 1957. <br /> <br />Analogously the British had a decade-long book translation and print program in post-war Germany and Austria that used literature as a way of influencing people's cultural and political opinions, and Cold War and de-Nazification efforts. British authors were chosen to form panels to select the books to be translated and distributed as well as perform in other roles. <br /> <br />The panel welcomes papers on the role that literature can play in national rivalries and programs, propaganda, any aspect of post-war Book Print programs in Europe or Russia, discussion of recently-released CIA or MOI documents or the involvement of particular authors, impact and rewards in these programs (outside the better-known 1967 CIA Encounter scandal). <br /> <br />Please send 300 word abstract and brief CV (one page) to Patricia Laurence, pat.laurence@gmail.com <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Boston, Ma., USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Patricia Laurence

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Travel Documents &amp; Documentation


Despite the ubiquity of the peripatetic figure in the modernist text, the early twentieth century is marked by persistent tensions on the traveller: as technological innovations granted greater mobility, the state moved to restrict motion. By the 1880s, transatlantic steamship crossing, once a weeks-long affair, could be completed in a mere five days, yet the introduction of mandatory passports in the West about 1914 meant the global traveler faced increasing juridical restrictions on their movement. These forces share a common thread: they are structured and made possible by paperwork. From the tickets, itineraries, and packing lists carried aboard steamships; to the passports and visas facilitating border crossings; to the letters of introduction and bank transfers cushioning the traveler’s arrival, the early twentieth century traveler’s movement was nothing if not well documented. While much of this ephemera was discarded by the traveller or their executor, some has taken on a more permanent status on the pages of books, or in writers’ archives. This panel explores the role travel documentation plays in writing from the first half of the twentieth century. <br /> <br />Potential questions include (but are not limited to): <br />-How does the ephemera of travel appear in modernist literature? <br />-How can we use archival evidence of a writer’s travels to understand their work? <br />-What relationship exists between travel documentation and fictional or non-fictional accounts of travel? <br /> <br />Please submit an abstract of 250-300 words.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Nissa Cannon

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Nation, Narration, and Revolution


The modernist period is characterized by national upheavals, from the Mexican Revolution, to the Russian Revolutions, to the controversial peace settlements of 1919, and the crises leading up to the Second World War. Modernist artists, writers and filmakers engaged with, and responded to these upheavals, adapting their media to narrate new kinds of national belonging and new versions of the national story. Exploring the connections between nation, narration, and revolution in its broadest sense, this panel seeks to bring together a variety of examples of modernist reactions to geopolitical upheaval. Its aim is not so much to achieve an overview or single interpretation of the way modernism’s forms arose codependently with new forms of the nation, but to demonstrate the plurality and variety of modernist strategies of responding to changes in the structure of the nation. In this way the panel hopes to touch on and question contemporary theories of transnational modernism—emphasizing the irreducible referential frame of a specific nation in many modernist works, prior to, or in addition to, global and subnational dimensions. Possible topics of discussion might include, for instance, Mariano Azuela’s Los de Abajo, Max Beckman’s tryptich Departure, montage in Battleship Potemkin; James Joyce’s Ulysses in the contexts of the Irish Revolution and Triestine irredentism; or France in Gertrude Stein’s 1945 memoir Wars I have Seen. Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Václav Paris (vaclavparis@gmail.com) by April 10.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: vaclav paris

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Sensory Revolutions: Women, Modernism, and Technology (MSA 17)


In The Senses of Modernism (2002), Sara Danius describes a late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century “crisis of the senses” initiated by new communications and representational technologies such as the telephone and cinema. Danius suggests that such a crisis has particular implications for conceptions of gender, but the questions of how technologies are gendered through their promotion of sensory experiences and how this technologically mediated “crisis of the senses” impacts the experience of gendered embodiment remain undertheorized. This panel will explore how media in the first half of the twentieth century shaped representations of gendered difference and androgyny through technologically enabled forms of embodiment and disembodiment. It will, in turn, also consider how early-twentieth-century technologies were adapted to reorient conceptions of gender in literature, art, and cinema as well as in discourses of psychology, biology, and engineering. In transforming Danius’s influential idea of the “crisis of the senses” into “sensory revolutions,” this panel further aims to focus on the affirmative possibilities of early twentieth-century technologies for feminist visibility and amplification as well as for disorientation. Questions we might address include: <br /> <br />• How did technologically-mediated perception influence early-twentieth-century movements for inclusive citizenship, such as suffrage movements, or liberation? How did changing sensory tropes of visibility and amplification reframe political possibilities for women in the first half of the twentieth century? <br />• While keeping in mind Jonathan Sterne’s challenge to reductive assumptions of intrinsic qualities of sight and sound in The Audible Past, we might still claim that different senses are infused with different cultural conceptions. How did gender and sexuality impact these conceptions and how might particular technologies reinforce or shift them? <br />• Visual culture and, more recently, sound studies have informed most research into the senses. How do questions of gender and sexuality in modernism change when we consider other senses of touch, taste, and smell that might be heightened or diminished through new technologies? <br />• We might posit two apparently oppositional sensory revolutions in modernism: the division of the senses through new technologies that Danius describes and a concomitant fascination with synaesthesia, or the melding of senses. How did conceptions of the relationship between the senses impact representations of gendered embodiment or androgynous disembodiment in the first half of the twentieth century? <br />• What is the relationship between sensory perceptions and psychoanalytic discoveries ostensibly determined by gender? How might this relationship itself be conceived through the technological? <br />• What feminist or queer phenomenologies did new technologies enable in the first half of the twentieth century or, in turn, what insights might a feminist or queer phenomenological reading of early twentieth century texts reveal about the relationship between gender and technology? <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts and a brief biography to Laurel Harris and Allyson DeMaagd at lharris@rider.edu and acdemaagd@mix.wvu.edu by April 10, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Laurel Harris and Allyson DeMaagd

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Modernism and Institutional Authority (MSA 17, 2015)


This panel seeks to explore modernism's relationship with traditional institutions and institutional authority. Sartre's rejection of the Nobel Prize; the creation of the Salon des Refusés in response to Académie des Beaux-Arts's Paris Salon; Forster, Shaw and Huxley's rejection of British knighthood; Yeats's creation of the Abbey Theatre: modernism initiated some of the most iconic rebellions against institutional power within the last two centuries. Equally plentiful are examples of modernists' apparent deference to institutional authority: Pinter, Bellow, Márquez and Morrison's acceptance of the Nobel Prize; e. e. cumming's lectures as guest professor at Harvard; Ted Hughes's acceptance of the position of Poet Laureate following Heaney's rejection of it. The inclusion of modernists within the institution often caused more shock waves than their direct rebellion, however: Heidegger's resignation as rector of the University of Freiburg because of his membership of the Nazi Party, for example, or the fight to gain institutional recognition for the graphic novel. <br /> <br /> What is the value of the modernist refusal to join traditional institutions? What drove other modernists to seek or accept inclusion in these institutions? Can we trace an 'inner-institutional' rebellion, a reworking of the traditional institution from the inside? In what other ways did modernism pioneer a challenge to or reworking of – or, indeed, an acceptance of – institutional authority? More broadly, how do we understand the shift from traditional forms of patronage through court or private sponsorship to larger institutional bodies? <br /> <br />This panel welcomes papers on literature, literary theory, philosophy, film studies and the visual and performing arts, on any topic connected with modernism's challenge, deference or reworking of institutional authority. Please send abstracts of 300-400 words and a brief academic biography (2-3 sentences) to Hannah Simpson at simpsonh@bu.edu by April 10, 2015.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Hannah Simpson

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The Imagist Revolution (MSA 17)


In critical appraisals of Imagism, the early 20th century movement has often been portrayed as "€œrevolutionary," especially in terms of form and technique. In 1963, William Pratt described the emergence of Imagism in England and America as a "battle for a new poetic style"€ and Helen Carr'€™s 2009 history of the movement takes its title from the often invoked epithet of the Imagists: The Verse Revolutionaries; however, this panel seeks to interrogate just how revolutionary Imagist practice was in relation to contemporaneous poetry and poetic practice. <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br /> <br />- The novelty and/or originality of Imagist poetry/poetic practice. <br />- The variety and diversity of Imagist practices. <br />- Rereading Imagism. <br />- The difficulty in delimiting and defining Imagist practice. <br />- The influences and/or legacies of Imagism. <br />- Imagist practice beyond the 1910s. <br />- The possible relationship between Imagist austerity or "€œhygiene"€, as Hugh Kenner terms it, and revolutionary violence and war, what Marinetti refers to as "€œthe world's only hygiene"€. <br />- Translating cultures through Imagist practice. (E.g. Greek in H.D., Japanese in Lowell and Pound, etc.) <br />- Imagism and potential appropriative violence. <br />- Imagism as an avant-garde. <br />- The "€œverse revolution" as expressed through Imagism. <br /> <br />Please send proposals (up to 300 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to John Allaster (john.allaster@mail.mcgill.ca). We welcome proposals on any topic that relates to the revolutionary nature of Imagism. Submissions must be received no later than April 10th, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: John Allaster

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Modernism and the Revolutionary Animal (MSA 17)


Taking up MSA 17's theme of "Modernism and Revolution," this panel interrogates how writers and artists in the first half of the twentieth century conceptualized the role of nonhuman animals and/or the concept of animality in relation to revolution (whether social, political, intellectual, artistic, or identarian). What role do animals or animality play in shaping concepts of revolution? Does revolution entail a reconceptualization of our own animality? To what extent do revolutionary visions unite us with or separate us from our fellow animals? The preceding questions are just examples; many alternate formulations relating to the panel's title are of course possible and welcome. <br /> <br />Papers on literature, the visual or performing arts, philosophy, or any other field of endeavor within the purview of Modernism will be considered. Please send abstracts of 300-400 words and a brief bio (2-3 sentences) to coles@uwosh.edu by April 10, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Stewart Cole

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Global Modernism and Civil War (MSA 17)


Wyndham Lewis'™s Blast is perhaps the most famous modernist declaration of civil war: "œWe set Humour at Humour's throat. / Stir up Civil War among peaceful apes." Lewis himself was named after an eccentric English mercenary who fought in the U.S. Civil War (by his American father, a veteran of the same war), and he returns to the trope in his 1937 autobiography, Blasting and Bombardiering: "You will be astonished to find how like art is to war, I mean '˜modernist€'™ art...I have set out to show how war, art, civil war, strikes and coup d'etat dovetail into each other." <br /> <br />This panel proposes extending recent interest in the Spanish Civil War to a comparative, structural, and intertextual analysis of internecine modernism. How does sectional conflict reframe our understanding of nationalism and world war? Papers could return to well-known national narratives, identify less familiar histories of schism, or develop new transnational or inter-historical approaches. <br /> <br />Topics and approaches might include: <br /> <br />- global perspectives on southern modernism and the U.S. Civil War (what Winston Churchill described as the “least avoidable” conflict in history): reconsideration of Paul Giles’s 2003 statement that “returning so obsessively to the trauma of the Civil War…indirectly asserts the primacy of traditional American ideals of federal unity and freedom” <br />- comparative perspectives on interwar schism: pro-fascist writing on the Spanish Civil War, or conflict in Finland (1918), Ireland (1922), Ecuador (1923), Nicaragua (1926), Mexico (1926), China (1927), Brazil (1932), Austria (1934) <br />- revisionary perspectives: civil war as precursor, corollary, or consequence of world war; World War I writing as literature of European Civil War <br />- competing narratives: civil war as revolution, insurrection, slave revolt, independence movement, pan-nationalism, regionalism <br />- new national allegories: partition, apartheid, secession, annexation, devolution, insurgency <br />- modernist factions: networks, coteries, clubs, troupes, unions, conferences, societies, federations <br />- modernism and transatlantic schism: the black Atlantic and double consciousness, Atlantic sectionalism, legacies of the English Civil Wars <br />- interdisciplinary frameworks: economic and imperial history; political science and international relations <br />- civil war in theory: Derrida'™s "œDeclarations of Independence"; Nancy'™s The Inoperative Community or Being Singular Plural; Agamben's State of Exception; Butler on precarity, dispossession, gender trouble <br /> <br />Contact Ryan Weberling (ryanweb@bu.edu) to discuss possibilities for the panel, or send a 300-word paper proposal by April 10.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Ryan Weberling

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Relatability


A specter is haunting university classrooms: the specter of "relatability." For many teachers past a certain age, this term hardly seems a word at all. Its limitations as an analytic term are manifest: its fuzzy subjectivism treats everything as its own reflection in a manner that inhibits both critique and description. Journalists and commentators have marveled at the viral spread of this critical judgment in the last ten years, yet the sense of “relate” at its core (as in, "I can relate to what you are going through") comes into usage in the middle of the twentieth century. This panel seeks to uncover a longer twentieth-century genealogy for "relatable" and to consider whether it might be recuperated as a meaningful critical term for thinking about twentieth as well as twenty-first century art and literature. That such recuperation might be worthwhile stems from our sense that relatability constitutes an important strain of modernist aesthetic theory, despite the latter's association with forms of objectivity and autonomy. Something not unlike relatability seems to underlie Gertrude Stein's claim, for instance, that "All literature is me to me, that isn't as bad as it sounds." From Stein to mid-century modernists such as Frank O'Hara, an aesthetic linked to forms of identification, mimesis, and likeness has been an important resource, especially for queer artists and audiences. More broadly, "relatability" indexes forms of aesthetic experience that have been associated with unschooled or amateur modes of responding to art and literature. Reincorporating such apparently preprofessional forms of relationality into professional scholarship has been an important impulse across the discipline. Indeed, many recent methodological developments in literary and cultural studies--Bruno Latour's injunction to trace the connections between things, Wai Chee Dimock's interest in weak ties--suggest that criticism's job is not to uncover truths or to apprehend unities but to discover that everything is in fact relatable. We solicit papers that consider relatability’s modernist pasts and critical futures. Please send a brief abstract and CV to glavey@sc.edu and l.heffernan@unf.edu by April 10.

Conference Location: Boston, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Brian Glavey

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The Modernism of Politics


MSA 17: The Modernism of Politics <br /> <br />The modernist period, as the theme of this year’s conference suggests, was a period marked by revolutions of various stripes: aesthetic, social, cultural, and political. Among these, political revolutions often occupied center stage, both in terms of public awareness but also in terms of modernist praxis. Many modernists participated in radical political actions even as they experimented or facilitated experimentation with radical aesthetics. <br /> <br />Taking the title of Raymond Williams’ canonical collection of essays, The Politics of Modernism, as its starting point, this panel reverses the formulation to ask what might be gained by attending to the “modernism of politics.” How might we rethink our approach to political events of the period if we consider them as influenced by modernism? In what ways might we imagine political struggle and revolution deriving tactics or rhetorics from the experiments of modernism? In what ways might we reconsider political activists drawing on their knowledge of modernism to further their political projects? <br /> <br />Events such as the Paterson Strike Pageant, designed to draw attention to the plight of workers by the Industrial Workers of the World and organized by Mabel Dodge who also helped organize the Armory Show the same year, suggest there are fruitful ways to re-conceptualize political events of the period as modernistic in themselves. Rather than asking what political beliefs some modernists may have had, successful papers will investigate how modernist ideas may have influenced political radicals, how modernism may have contributed to political struggles of the period, or how the aesthetics of modernism were repurposed for political struggles. <br /> <br />I am accepting abstracts of 300-500 words. Please email them as a word document along with a short bio or CV to Matthew Hannah, mhannah@uoregon.edu, by April 10th. Interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome, and some fruitful areas of study might include: <br /> <br />Periodical studies <br />Digital humanities <br />Historical approaches <br />Salon studies <br />Marxism as/against modernism <br />Socialism or anarchism <br />Propaganda and modernism <br />Colonial or Postcolonial contexts for modernism <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Matthew Hannah

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Modernism and the Mind Sciences


Modernism grew up alongside a range of revolutionary mind sciences. While modernism’s engagements with what Nikolas Rose and Joelle Abi-Rached term the “psy disciplines”—including psychology, psychoanalysis, and psychiatry—have captivated literary critics for decades, recent critical inquiry has demonstrated how modernist texts inform or push against contemporary theories of cognition, including embodied and extended cognition. These approaches suggest that modernism’s interest in subjectivity continues to inform and/or resist current scientific approaches to the mind. This panel explores the (often competing) theories of mind, brain, and self in modernist texts through the lens of modernism’s (often ambivalent) relationship to the mind sciences of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. <br /> <br />The papers on this panel seek to address the following questions: How do modernist texts respond to scientific claims about the self? How do modernist texts incorporate, revise, or challenge the principles of specific mind sciences? What theories of cognition do modernist texts propose? And what values about the human are implied by modernism’s fascination with cognitive processes? This panel welcomes papers on literature, the visual and performing arts, and literary theory and philosophy. Of particular interest are papers that attend to cognitive or neurological disabilities in relation to (pseudo-)sciences of the mind. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Rebecah Pulsifer at pulsife2@illinois.edu by April 10. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Rebecah Pulsifer

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The Means, Ends, and Representation of Radical Political Experience


This panel will focus on modernist literature that represents the means of radical or revolutionary political movements – instinctual repression, iron discipline and eclipse of personal freedom, hierarchical organization, etc. – in opposition to their manifest goals of personal freedom and equality. <br /> <br />Some of the questions to be addressed include: <br /> <br />How does this contradiction tend to resolve itself in modernist literature? Or, alternatively, is there a tendency for modernist writers to refuse to represent its resolution? If so, why? Does this difficulty of representing this contradiction catalyze formal innovation? Or, again, do the revolutionary aesthetic innovations of a particular movement usually considered to be politically neutral have a hitherto untheorized or undertheorized relationship to political culture of the period? <br /> <br />Please send paper abstracts to charles.sumner@usm.edu by April 10, 2015.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Charles Sumner

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Race and Revolution (MSA 17)


This panel welcomes papers exploring how creative writers and other cultural actors understood racial identity in light of twentieth-century political revolutions. How, for example, did the Afro-diaspora conceive of “blackness” or “Négritude” in the wake of communist upheavals in the Soviet Union (and later Asia, Latin America, and Africa)? How did Marxist revolutionary regimes make space for or undermine cultural expressions that privileged race ahead of social class? What new aesthetic forms (in poetry, fiction, film, theater, visual art, and music) emerged out of contact between racialized subject positions and revolutionary contexts? <br /> <br />Possible topics include (but are hardly limited to): <br /> <br />• Afro-diaspora experiences in the Soviet Union, Cuba, and Other Revolutionary Societies <br />• Avant-garde Film and Race <br />• Inter-racial Revolutionary Alliances <br />• Intra-racial Revolutionary Rivalries <br />• The “Jewish Question” and Modernism <br />• Latinidad and Revolution <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstract and brief CV (one page) to Michael Soto at msoto@trinity.edu <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Michael Soto

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Feminist Projects in Modernism and Digital Humanities


Textual Revolutions: Feminist Projects in Modernism and Digital Humanities <br /> <br />As copyright expires on texts published in the first half of the twentieth century, modernist scholars working in the digital humanities are encountering increased options for online publication, collaborative scholarship, and creative interpretation of modernist texts. With this methodological shift comes an opportunity for feminist scholars to recover, re-represent, and re-contextualize publications by women which may have been lost to the politics of twentieth-century publication, and also to direct attention to the rich conversations about intersections of gender, race, and social class that shaped the period's literature and politics. The development of digital projects--whether archival, explicative, or creative--will substantially impact the placement of women, of gender issues, and of feminist politics within the twenty-first century modernist canon. <br /> <br />Organized in response to conversations from the MSA 16 roundtable on Feminism and the Future of Modernist Studies and the seminar on Transnational Women Modernists about the importance of promoting digital scholarship on women and gender, this panel will showcase digital humanities projects that work at the intersections of modernism and feminism. Panelists are invited to share ongoing or past work on a specific project, or to present on theoretical or practical aspects of incorporating a feminist approach into a modernist digital humanities project. Presentations may touch on issues including: starting and obtaining funding for feminist digital humanities projects; contributions of ongoing feminist digital humanities projects to modernist scholarship; specific challenges in finding or contextualizing work by women writers; issues related to copyright, particularly in regard to unknown authors; pedagogical implications or opportunities arising from feminist digital humanities projects. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 300 words to Layne Craig at a.layne.craig@tcu.edu by April 10.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Layne Craig

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Hearing Voices (MSA 17)


Hearing Voices <br />How do we hear poetic voice? How do poems reflect and respond to language as spoken and heard? Moving beyond habitual equations of voice with sincerity, what perspectives might we bring to bear on the phenomenon of hearing and the idea of voice in the poetry of modernism and after? <br /> <br />- Do voices imply persons? <br />- How should we understand the relationship between hearing and reading? <br />- How does live performance, and how do recording practices and technologies, affect our understanding of how a poem sounds? <br />- Hearing voices can be a form of inspiration, or of madness. How do poems lay claim to (or shy away from) these possibilities? <br />- How do questions of voice and hearing help (or hinder) our understanding of modernist poetry and of the contested legacy of modernism from midcentury to the present? <br /> <br />Papers on modernist, mid-century, and contemporary poetry and poetics are invited, and might address topics including aurality and textuality; metricality and musicality; performance; inner speech / inner listening; tone; poetic address; etc. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Reena Sastri (reena.sastri@gmail.com) by Monday April 06, 2015.

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 06, 2015

For more information, contact: Reena Sastri

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Industrial Revolutions (MSA 17)


Industrial Revolutions (MSA 17) <br /> <br />Modernist Studies Association 17th Annual Conference: Modernism & Revolution <br />Boston, MA (November 19 – 22, 2015) <br /> <br />This interdisciplinary panel seeks papers on any aspect of we might call an "industrial revolution" of modernity that will discuss its impact on modernist aesthetics and/or cultural production. Historical, theoretical, and critical approaches are all welcome, as are topics on Machine Age management and technology, corporatism and consumer capitalism, urban development, and mass communication media (including, but not limited to cinema). Authors may consider industrial context as a condition of modernist practices or as a thematic concern of modernist literature and the visual/performing arts. <br /> <br />By Sun., Apr. 5 (11:59 p.m.), please e-mail abstracts of up to 300 words to Will Scheibel at willscheibel@gmail.com. Please also include a 5 item bibliography and brief academic bio. <br /> <br />Thank you, <br /> <br />Will Scheibel, Ph.D. <br />Adjunct Faculty, College of Arts & Sciences <br />Classroom Office Bldg. <br />800 East Third Street <br />Indiana University <br />Bloomington, IN 47401

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2015

For more information, contact: Will Scheibel

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Modes of Relative Certainty


Modes of Relative Certainty <br /> <br />This panel will explore areas of “relative certainty” in modernism, where the supposed impossibility of knowing anything for certain meets the practical reality that things can be known well enough that readers and citizens can make use of them. In the wake of postmodernist criticism’s essential disdain for certain knowledge and a general acceptance of modernists as ambiguous, ironic, enigmatical, interested in differance and lack, textual density and obscure allusions, we bring attention to the ways modernist texts celebrate positive knowledge--as contingent as that knowledge may be. <br /> <br />Although uncertainty will undoubtedly remain an important mode of reading modernist texts, and it may produce vital inquiry into the ways narrative meaning constructs our lives, we question the ways modernists actually worked to produce epistemological change. Could attention to relative certainty--quasi-, partial, functional, or temporary certainty--lead to more nuanced understandings of modernist texts? How might critical conversations benefit from a return to some sense of the value of certainty, a position that could serve as the basis for ethical, political, and social consensus? Is some certainty necessary for the construction of reading communities? <br /> <br />Areas of discussion might include scientific and cultural relativity; pragmatic and phenomenological perspectives on truth and reality; the persistence of mimetic representation; cultural, national, or racial relative certainty; gender categories and readability; anthropology; ethics; the relative certainty of modernist “grammars;” reading practices that lead to or presuppose common ground; and affect transmission. <br /> <br />Submit 300 word proposals with a one-page CV to luke.mueller@tufts.edu by April 5, 2015.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2015

For more information, contact: Luke Mueller

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Narrating Modernism (MSA 17)


Revolution produces future possibilities limited by the material conditions of history, as well as reflections on the past. This panel will explore the capacity for modernism to consider its own history and thereby take narrative control of its future. In their recent piece in PMLA, David James and Urmila Seshagiri identify among certain contemporary authors a literary attitude they call metamodernism: that is, a tendency to "place a conception of modernism as revolution at the heart of their fictions." James and Seshagiri describe a relationship between early twentieth-century modernism and its literary descendants that consists of self-conscious dissent and defamiliarization. Pursuing James and Seshagiri's return to periodization, this panel will observe examples of postwar fiction that take the topic of modernism as a significant, if not central, theme. Potential papers may consider (but are not limited to) topics such as the reflexivity of late modernist narrative, the impact of technology on modernist experimentation, or the ambiguous position of the modernist subject. Furthermore, papers may also consider the usefulness of the term "metamodernism" and whether this term accurately describes the longevity of the modernist legacy. This panel welcomes submissions on topics in literature and literary theory, as well as philosophy, the visual and performing arts, and film studies. Please send a 300-word abstract and brief professional bio to Patrick Whitmarsh at pwhitmar@bu.edu by April 3.

Conference Location: Boston, United States
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2015

For more information, contact: Patrick Whitmarsh

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Modernism and Melodrama (MSA 17)


Peter Brooks has claimed that nineteenth-century melodrama responds to the disappearance of the sacred in every day life; its goal is to produce readability by exploiting the “plastic figurability of emotion, its shaping as a visible and almost tactile entity.” The resulting visual context, populated by the mute, the disfigured, and the paralytic, involves an excess of signification that hyperbolizes ethical conflict, consistently pressuring the signified, for access to the “immediate behind,” toward an ideal of complete expression. How might modernist texts exploit this genre or reorganize its codes, particularly in their commentary on ethics, expression, and the nature of personhood? Since the goal of melodrama is to produce readability, how might we think of modernist illegibility as an ethics? What is the relation between modernist melodrama and the history of emotional expression? What relevance does melodrama have for thinking about disability? What is the relationship between melodrama and modernist form, more generally? <br /> <br />This panel welcomes papers on any or all of these topics. Of interest are papers that address the conference theme, the question of ethics, or the relation between melodramatic modernist form and various shifts in the history of expression. <br /> <br />Please send a 150-200 word abstract plus a brief bio by April 3, 2015 to rchllrives@gmail.com <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2015

For more information, contact: Rochelle Rives

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Modernism's Revolutionary Geographies (MSA 17)


Building on the recent €œ"spatial turn"€ in modernist studies exemplified by scholars such as Andrew Thacker in Moving through Modernity: Space and Geography in Modernism (2003) and Rebecca Walsh in The Geopoetics of Modernism (2015), and in keeping with the conference theme of revolution, this panel considers modernism's innovative contributions to the ontology and perception of urban space, focusing particularly on counter-normative cartographies and deviant spatial practices. <br /> <br />Modernist authors and visual artists often revolutionized, resisted, or challenged normative geographies and mapping practices through their texts. The papers included will address such moments of geographical tension or subversive spatial play, and will emphasize ground-level experiences of cities. The papers will consider questions such as: If space and geography are central to modernist aesthetics, then how do authors and/or artists transform spatial concepts and geographical landscapes? And what roles do re-mappings, subversive spatial appropriations, or deviant spatial practices play within modernist textual practice? This panel hopes to be interdisciplinary and welcomes paper topics in literature, the visual and performing arts, architecture and urban planning, theory, and philosophy. <br /> <br />Potential topics include, but are not limited to <br />-urban sub-cultures/counter-spaces; liminal urban space; deviant <br />spatial practices; revisionist/resistant cartography; <br />-Guidebook/tourist discourse and urban space; <br />-Flanerie; urban walks; street politics; street harassment; <br />-urban technologies and modernist mappings; white space / page space versus physical space; <br />-transatlantic mappings and/or migrations; expatriations, repatriation, homelands, exiles, pilgrimages; <br />-geography/geology and modernism; the periodization of modernism and space: time and space in modernity; the evolution of space and/or maps through modernism(s) (space at the limits--temporally and otherwise--of modernism); Jane Jacobs, Robert Moses, Samuel Delany: mapping the inheritance of modernism <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstract and brief CV (one page) to Candis Bond at cbond2@slu.edu <br />

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2015

For more information, contact: Candis Bond

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Mexican Revolution and U.S. Modernism


The Mexican Revolution and U.S. Modernism <br /> <br />How does the “proximity of social revolution”—one of Perry Anderson’s criteria for the development of modernism in Europe—affect the aesthetic and political development of U.S. modernism? This panel seeks to look south to the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath (post-1910) to establish how it served as a crucial influence on U.S. modernist culture. Potential topics might include: <br />• proletarian art and aesthetics <br />• revolutionary narrative modes <br />• iconographies of revolution <br />• “permanent” or unfinished revolution <br />• violence and mass warfare <br />• expatriation and exile <br />• tourism, decadence <br />• gender of modernity/gender of revolution <br />• modernist communities and little magazines <br />• technology, industrialization, and the worker <br />• radical indigenous subjectivities <br />• anti-colonial and decolonial rhetorics <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstract and one-page C.V. to; ggano@antiochcollege.org. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2015

For more information, contact: Geneva Gano

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Querying hybridity


The emergence of hybridity as a modernist ideal <br />The polyphonic text of Pound or Joyce claims to speak to universal accessibility on the aesthetic and musical levels, something old but newly transformative. A more difficult construct of hybridity might be the mestizaje of Nicolás Guillén or Lydia Cabrera and cognate blends of Africanicity with the aesthetic norms of mainstream society. These waters are in my view troubled by emergent nationalisms. Perhaps neither purity nor hybridity are ideal or counterpoised constructs. Does hybridity resolve issues of witness in the context of impossible silence? Can an emergent national culture spring from hybrid roots? Powerful macaronic texts may provide evidence of new forms of receptivity or serve only as evidence of obscurantism? This panel will both explore and challenge norms of hybridity and the role hybridity now plays as a way of composition underwritten by profound humanistic norms. Or not? <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 23, 2015

For more information, contact: Don Wellman

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Edited Volume: Modernism and the Anthrpocene


Edited Volume on Modernism and the Anthropocene <br />Deadline for Proposals: March 31, 2015 <br /> <br />Edited by Jon Hegglund, Washington State University and <br />John McIntyre, University of Prince Edward Island <br /> <br />We are seeking 500-word proposals for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the representation of the Anthropocene within modernist literature and culture. As a whole, the volume examines the emerging and complex relationship between Anglo-American modernism and its geological, climatological, and deep historical contexts, as it is articulated in a range of literary texts, movements, and expressions in the first half of the twentieth century. <br /> <br /> <br />Please email proposals and queries to <br />Jon Hegglund: hegglund@wsu.edu or <br />John McIntyre: jmcintyre@upei.ca <br /> <br /> <br />In 2000, the atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen invoked the term “Anthropocene” to describe the period since the onset of the Industrial Revolution as an era defined by humanity’s active intervention into the environmental record on a planetary scale. In its identification of a new relation between humans and their environments, the Anthropocene has become a useful term for the humanities in understanding how literary and cultural texts respond to these conditions of planetary change. Given that the temporal scope of Anglo-American modernism coincides with an acceleration of the human transformation of the Earth, we would expect to see literature and art register these phenomena, whether directly or obliquely. With such work in mind, we seek proposals for papers that explore the relationship between modernism, modernity, and the Anthropocene, taking into account how these can be seen as mutually constitutive planetary phenomena. We are interested in essays which explore modernist representations of the environment, natural ecosystems, geological time scales, and climate and climatic events, as those phenomena are related to and impacted by human activity. <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br /> <br />representations of droughts, floods, storms and other forms of “extreme” weather in modernist texts <br />representations of geological "events" such as earthquakes, volcanoes, or tidal surges in modernist texts <br />transnational and trans-cultural contrasts across modernist representations of the environment <br />the impact of human activity and agency upon climate and vice versa <br />the relationship between genre, environment, and climate within and across modernist texts <br />modernist concepts of temporal and/or spatial scale as they relate to climatic and environmental representation <br />weather events and "natural" disasters as narrative cruxes or crises <br />modernist anxieties or fantasies about species extinction (including the human species) <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: March 31, 2015
Conference Ends: March 31, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2015

For more information, contact: John McIntyre

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Popular Modernisms at MSA 17


Dear MSA Members, <br /> <br />I am interested in organizing a panel for MSA 17 in Boston that examines intersections, exchanges, overlaps, and engagements between modernism and popular forms of cultural production. Please send 300 word abstracts of papers on any aspect of popular modernism/modernism and the popular by March 15 to Paul Peppis (ppeppis@uoregon.edu). <br /> <br />Many thanks, <br />Paul Peppis <br />English <br />University of Oregon <br />Eugene, OR 97403

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: November 19, 2015
Conference Ends: November 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Paul Peppis

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“Interconnections: Patterns, Pathways &amp; Possibilities” 9th Annual University of Rhode Island Graduate Student Conference


The 9th Annual University of Rhode Island Graduate Student Conference <br />Kingston, RI Campus <br /> <br />Saturday April 18, 2015 <br /> <br />The URI Graduate Conference gives graduate students the opportunity to present their research or clinical work while receiving interdisciplinary feedback from, and networking with, peers and faculty. We invite proposals for paper and poster presentations, strongly encouraging submissions from across all disciplines. We also consider proposals that extend beyond this year’s theme: <br /> <br />“Interconnections: Patterns, Pathways & Possibilities” <br /> <br />Interconnections are the points at which two or more things are conjoined in mutual exchange; they constitute spaces as between, among, or amid. The liminal space of interconnections asks us to integrate, tolerate, appreciate, and celebrate uncertainty. It is here that we account for complexity, find fresh new approaches to familiar problems, and rejuvenate overly constrained thinking. Through the lens of interdisciplinarity, we can focus upon unnoticed patterns, find new productive pathways forward, and discover the rich new possibilities that flourish. Interdisciplinarity invites us to negotiate between the disciplines’ diverse methods, assumptions, and values. <br /> <br />Inviting submissions from all fields and disciplines, such as, but not limited to: <br /> <br />Humanities: History, Linguistics, Literature & Literary Studies, Arts, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Film and Media Studies, etc. <br /> <br />Social Sciences: Anthropology, Archaeology, Area Studies, Cultural and Ethnic Studies, Economics, Gender and Sexuality, Geography, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, etc. <br /> <br />Natural Sciences: Space Sciences, Earth Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, etc. <br /> <br />Formal Sciences: Logic, Mathematics, Statistics, Systems Science, etc. <br /> <br />Professions & Applied Sciences: Agriculture, Architecture & Design, Business, Computer Sciences, Education, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Healthcare, Journalism, Media Studies and Communication, Law, Library and Museum Studies, Military Sciences, Public Administration, Social Work, Transportation Studies, etc. <br /> <br />Additional information and submission instructions: <br /> <br />URIGradConference.org <br /> <br />Deadline: Friday, February 27th <br />Decisions regarding proposals will be announced starting Friday, March 13th <br /> <br />URIGradConference.org : URIGradConference2015@gmail.com

Conference Location: Kingston, RI, USA
Conference Starts: April 18, 2015
Conference Ends: April 18, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: February 27, 2015

For more information, contact: Michael Becker

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Hart Crane Society at the ALA


The Hart Crane Society seeks proposals for a panel at the American Literature Association Conference in Boston from May 21-24, 2015. Papers related to any aspect of Crane’s work are welcome, but the Society would particularly like to encourage discussion of: Crane’s first collection, White Buildings; his posthumously published ‘tropical memories’ in Key West: An Island Sheaf; transatlantic readings of Crane; Crane and the Midwest; and Crane and Mexico. <br /> <br />Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Niall Munro, niall.munro@brookes.ac.uk, no later than January 26, 2015. The paper should last no longer than twenty minutes. Please include a short biography, and indicate any expected audio-visual needs. <br /> <br />For more information about the upcoming conference, visit: http://alaconf.org/annual-conference/ <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: May 21, 2015
Conference Ends: May 24, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: January 26, 2015

For more information, contact: Niall Munro

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CFP (reminder): Hart Crane Society at the ALA


The Hart Crane Society seeks proposals for a panel at the American Literature Association Conference in Boston from May 21-24, 2015. Papers related to any aspect of Crane’s work are welcome, but the Society would particularly like to encourage discussion of: Crane’s first collection, White Buildings; his posthumously published ‘tropical memories’ in Key West: An Island Sheaf; transatlantic readings of Crane; Crane and the Midwest; and Crane and Mexico. <br /> <br />Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Niall Munro, niall.munro@brookes.ac.uk, no later than January 26, 2015. The paper should last no longer than twenty minutes. Please include a short biography, and indicate any expected audio-visual needs. <br /> <br />For more information about the upcoming conference, visit the ALA Conference site: http://alaconf.org

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: May 21, 2015
Conference Ends: May 24, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: January 26, 2015

For more information, contact: Niall Munro

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&quot;At Home in the Space Between&quot;


At Home in the Space Between <br /> <br />June 19-21, 2015 <br /> <br />University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA <br /> <br />The 2015 conference of The Space Between society, ‘At Home in the Space Between,’ focuses on the concept of home during the period 1914-1945. ‘Home’ as a space invites discussions of interiority, belonging, and family. It also conjures alternate conceptions of haunting, anxiety, and alienation. From notions of the Great War’s ‘home front’ to the interwar period’s ‘back to home and duty,’ politicized notions of home are especially rich during this period. The innovative design and lifestyle experimentation of this period also invite studies of a domestic modernity. The conference ‘At Home in the Space Between’ requests papers from all disciplines that consider ‘home’ in the broadest sense as both space and concept. <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br /> <br />Dwelling (as a modern practice as well as a domestic space) <br />Interiors and Interiority <br />Modern Architecture and Interior Design <br />Home Front <br />Homeland <br />Home Life <br />Feeling at Home; Belonging <br />Anxiety and the Home; Claustrophobia <br />Homelessness <br />Domestic Modernity <br />Labor and the Home; Domestic Service <br />Technology and the Home <br />Home and Abroad <br /> <br />Submissions should include an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biographical statement. Please send your abstracts through our web site: <br /> <br />http://spacebetweensociety.org/conference/2015-conference-information/ <br /> <br />The deadline for receipt of abstracts is 15 January 2015. <br /> <br />Barbara Green <br /> <br />Associate Professor of English <br />Concurrent Faculty Gender Studies <br />University of Notre Dame <br />Notre Dame IN 46556 <br />green.15@nd.edu

Conference Location: Notre Dame, USA
Conference Starts: June 19, 2015
Conference Ends: June 21, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2015

For more information, contact: Robert Hemmings

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TSE at ALA (Boston)


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2015 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 21-24, 2015, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston. Please send proposals (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 10, 2015. <br /> <br />For information on the ALA and its 2015 meeting, please see the ALA website at www.americanliteratureassociation.org. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: May 21, 2015
Conference Ends: May 24, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: January 10, 2015

For more information, contact: Nancy K. Gish

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Climate Change and Culture Conference


This is a call for papers for the Climate Change in Culture Conference to be hosted by the University of Prince Edward Island in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, May 28-31, 2015. <br /> <br />As climate change becomes arguably the most pressing issue of our time, with evolving implications for societies in every cultural context, we seek to enhance our understanding of the ways in which culture and climate intersect with and animate one another. Cultural responses to and representations of climate are particularly compelling at a time when catastrophic weather events are becoming more commonly manifest and are inspiring a wide array of cultural and interpretive responses. Paying particular attention to the cultural implications of climate and to cultural, political, and societal responses to climate change, this conference explores how humanities-based scholarship can be brought to bear upon the evolving reality of climate change. Conference events include keynote talks given by internationally renowned climate and culture scholars, traditional academic papers and presentations, and a variety of interdisciplinary and multimedia performances. We thus invite submissions from scholars from across the humanities, broadly defined, who are dealing with any aspect of climate and climate change in a cultural context. <br /> <br />Possible topics, include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />literary and artistic (visual, filmic, photographic, etc) representations of climate and climate change <br />social and historical understandings of climate, weather, and the role of human agency; <br /> <br />climate change and ethics <br /> <br />climate change and questions of social justice including the differing questions of climate change posed by identity categories such as gender, race, disability, class, and citizenship <br /> <br />understandings of climate and the environment in antiquity and the classical world <br /> <br />cross-cultural interpretations of, and responses to climate and climate change <br /> <br />the implications of climate change on the production and reception of art, whatever the form <br /> <br />the roles of denial, fear, skepticism and rejection vis a vis climate change <br /> <br />threats to linguistic and cultural communities posed by climate change <br /> <br />teaching climate and climate change in the humanities and social sciences <br /> <br />the evolving place of the environmental humanities in curricular development <br /> <br />islands and their particular vulnerability to climate change, island-based narratives and representations of climate <br /> <br />The conference is hosted by the University of Prince Edward Island, home of the Atlantic Climate Lab and the Institute of Island Studies. UPEI is situated in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on the east coast of Canada. As the capital and principle city of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown is a vibrant cultural destination, home of the world-renowned Confederation Centre of the Arts Performing Arts Centre and birthplace of Canadian confederation. Prince Edward Island is known for its breathtaking natural beauty and charm, thus making it an especially apt location for a conference on climate change and its human implications. <br /> <br />http://www.climatechangeinculture.com/ <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words to jmcintyre@upei.ca by January 5, 2015. <br />

Conference Location: Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Conference Starts: May 28, 2015
Conference Ends: May 31, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: January 05, 2015

For more information, contact: John McIntyre

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