Member Services

MSA CFPs Ended in 2014

Back to Main Index

November

September

July

June

May

April

March

February

January



cognitive futures 2015


Cognitive Futures 2015 — Forging Futures from the Past: History and Cognition (http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/cognitivefutures) <br /> <br />Building on the work of the Cognitive Futures network in Bangor (2013) and Durham (2014: http://coghumanities.com) the 2015 conference aims once again to bring together a wide array of papers from the cognitive sciences, philosophy, literary studies, linguistics, narratology, cultural studies, critical theory, film, performance studies and beyond. The guiding question behind the conference will be the relative demands of universality and historicity in studies of cognition: how much historical specificity can and should a cognitive approach to culture take into account?; how might cognitive universals benefit from sociohistorical particulars?; what are the opportunities that cognitivism brings to ‘traditional’, historicist and poststructuralist inquiry?; is there a middle ground between a non-intentionalist, phylogenetic, cognitive evolutionary history and a literary history driven by human agency and subjectivity? We invite responses to these large questions to bear on cognitive topics such as mindreading/mentalizing; embodiment; ‘bio’ narratives/biocentrism; movement/kinesis; space/navigation; the self/subjectivity/qualia; perception and memory; bilingualism/multilingualism; translation; performance; affect and emotion ; neuro-phenomenology; neuro-aesthetics. Other issues and topics relevant to the conference include, but are not limited to, the following: <br /> <br />Deep time, Deep history, Big history. <br />Adaptation devices. <br />Sociohistorical analyses of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive literary criticism. <br />The biologization of culture <br />Postcolonial/cross-cultural perspectives on the cognitive. <br />The linguistic turn and the cognitive turn <br />(Epi)genetics <br />Cognitive disability and mental illness. <br /> <br />Confirmed plenary speakers: Hans Adler (Wisconsin); Paul Armstrong (Brown); Terence Cave (Oxford); Melba Cuddy-Keane (Toronto); John Neubauer (Amsterdam). <br /> <br />The conference will be held at Worcester College, Oxford on 13-15 April 2015. <br /> <br />Submission Details <br />We will be accepting submissions for individual papers, pre-formed panels and pre-conference workshops. For individual papers please send 250-word proposals to cognitive2015@ccc.ox.ac.uk by 21st November 2014. For pre-formed panels and workshops, please submit individual abstracts as well as a summary paragraph. All submissions should be in Word file attachments and be anonymised. A short biography including the title of the paper, the name of the presenter, affiliation and email address should be sent as a separate attachment. For more information contact ben.morgan@worc.ox.ac.uk or sowon.park@ell.ox.ac.uk. <br />

Conference Location: Oxford, UK
Conference Starts: April 13, 2015
Conference Ends: April 15, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: November 21, 2014

For more information, contact: Sowon Park

Back to Top





TSE @ Louisville


The T. S. Eliot Society will again sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 26–28, 2015. Abstracts on any subject reasonably related to Eliot are invited. For further information on the 2015 conference, please visit the website: www.thelouisvilleconference.com. <br />Those interested should send a 300-word abstract to John Morgenstern (jmorgen@clemson.edu) no later than September 10, 2014. Please include your academic affiliation (if applicable) and a brief biographical note with your abstract. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Conference Starts: February 26, 2015
Conference Ends: February 28, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: September 10, 2014

For more information, contact: John Morgenstern

Back to Top





21st-Century Moore


21st-century Moore <br /> March 19-22, 2015 <br /> University of Houston <br /> Call for Papers <br /> <br /> <br />In March 2015 the University of Houston will host the first meeting in a decade to focus on the writings of the major Modernist poet Marianne Moore. <br /> <br />Scholars, poets, and artists will convene to discuss, debate, and celebrate Moore's work, laying the groundwork for the future of Moore studies. <br /> <br />In light of the past decade's work on Moore, including variorum and facsimile editions of her early and middle-period work and a ground-breaking new biography by Linda Leavell, the conference will examine Moore's place in the twenty-first century's understanding of Modernism. <br /> <br />Papers are invited on any aspect of Marianne Moore’s work, including its role in the development and progress of Modernism, or in the history of international and/or American poetry and poetics, and along diverse lines of inquiry, such as textual scholarship, influence studies, and cultural, eco-critical, age, queer and science studies. <br /> <br />The format will allow all attendees to hear all papers, for a fully engaged discussion. <br /> <br />The organizers invite interested parties to submit abstracts (no more than 250 words) for scholarly and creative presentations. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts with brief resumé and MOORE ABSTRACT in the subject line to egregory@uh.edu by July 15th 2014. <br /> <br />Steering Committee: Fiona Green, Elizabeth Gregory, Stacy Hubbard, Cristanne Miller, Heather Cass White. <br /> <br />Please forward this Call to others who might like to participate. <br />

Conference Location: Houston, USA
Conference Starts: March 19, 2015
Conference Ends: March 22, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: July 15, 2014

For more information, contact: Elizabeth Gregory

Back to Top





Inaugural Conference of the Samuel Beckett Society


The Samuel Beckett Society announces a Call for Papers for its inaugural conference to be held in collaboration with Arizona State University on February 19 and 20, 2015. The first conference of the SBS represents the opportunity to bring together new, emerging, and established perspectives on the Beckett’s writing for a sustained exchange of ideas. In recent years, increased attention has been given to the historical, political, and “Irish” dimensions of his work, complementing and sometimes contesting the rich tradition of theoretically driven criticism in Beckett studies. This tradition has continued in new volumes that have reassessed the oeuvre with lenses derived from animal studies, the ethical thought of Emanuel Levinas, and the cinematic writings of Gilles Deleuze, to name only a few examples. The “Beckett and …” phenomenon thus continues apace, as recent book-length studies have coupled the writer with science, the Bible, the modern novel, German literature, Alfred Bion, and Arnold Geulincx. At the same time, a major editorial project has been undertaken to produce a digital archive of Beckett’s manuscripts, accompanied by volumes analyzing the genesis of each text. <br /> <br />With the array of work now being done in the field, we would like to provide a forum for various perspectives to meet, interact, and shed light on one another. The conference organizers welcome paper submissions that seek to move Beckett studies forward along one of these many axes, particularly contributions that locate their positions in relation to broader developments in the field. Specific topics might include, but are not limited to, longstanding concerns about Beckett’s relationship with philosophy, modernism, or postmodernism; or more recent interest in the digital humanities, historicist criticism, or emerging theoretical fields. The conference program is already taking shape: Professor David Lloyd will deliver a keynote address; ASU will present a concert featuring pieces associated with Beckett and his work; and a roundtable session will focus on Beckett and the digital humanities. There will be no parallel sessions, but rather a series of three-presenter panels, to facilitate in-depth engagement and discussion. To be considered for a 20-minute presentation, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to Patrick Bixby, Gregory Castle, and Sean Kennedy at beckettconference2015@gmail.com by July 1, 2014. <br /> <br />All delegates speaking at the conference must be members of the Samuel Beckett Society; the SBS will offer a bursary to pay travel expenses for one graduate student. Visit our conference website at: http://links.asu.edu/beckett2015. Follow us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/beckett2015. <br />

Conference Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
Conference Starts: February 19, 2015
Conference Ends: February 20, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: July 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Patrick Mark Sean Gregory

Back to Top





Doris Lessing 2014 - An International Conference


DORIS LESSING 2014: AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE – <br />CALL FOR PAPERS <br />Date: Friday/Saturday 12/13th September 2014 <br />Venue: University of Plymouth, Devon, UK <br />Please send 200 word abstracts for a 20 minute paper, along with a brief biography, to dorislessingconference@gmail.com <br />by Monday 30 June 2014 <br /> <br />In one of the many obituaries from fellow writers that followed Doris Lessing’s death in 2013, Joyce Carol Oates observed that ‘it might be said of Doris Lessing, as Walt Whitman boasted of himself: I am vast, I contain multitudes.’ Doris Lessing 2014: An International Conference, takes the end of Lessing’s long life as the starting point for a renewed engagement with her life and work. This conference seeks to stimulate new scholarship on Lessing’s work by embracing her vast multitudes: her contexts ranging from Iran and Zimbabwe to London; her genres from documentary to science fiction to life writing; and her engagements with political ideologies from Marxism and imperialism to feminism and environmentalism. Reflecting Lessing’s own lifelong interest in the positions and politics of reading, it aims to bring together a diverse range of scholars, critics and readers to reflect on the legacy and future of Lessing work. It will also try to extend our sense of how Lessing connects to a host of other writers, a list that might include (but is certainly not limited to): Margaret Atwood, John Osborne, John Berger, J. M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Kurt Vonnegut, Virginia Woolf, Idries Shah, Olaf Stapledon, Leo Tolstoy, Marcel Proust, D. H. Lawrence, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Drabble . . . Finally, the conference aims to not only generate new research on Lessing’s work, but to use Lessing’s lifelong commitment to a common and global literary culture to discuss her relevance to that most pressing topic of contemporary debate: the public role and value of the humanities. <br /> <br />Submission are invited on topics including, but certainly not limited to: <br /> Lessing’s relationships to other writers <br /> Lessing, Empire and post/coloniality <br /> Lessing, life writing and auto/biography <br /> Lessing, Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene <br /> Lessing’s craft and style <br /> Lessing and feminism <br /> Lessing, Communism and politics <br /> Lessing and the legacies of modernism <br /> Lessing, spirituality and religion <br /> Lessing and science fiction <br /> Lessing’s readers <br /> Lessing and world literature <br /> Lessing’s genres <br /> Lessing and cultural criticism <br /> Lessing, theatre and opera <br /> Lessing’s emotions and affects <br /> <br />Confirmed speakers: Laura Marcus, Nick Bentley, Clare Hanson, Susan Watkins; more to follow shortly … <br /> <br />www.dorislessing2014.com <br />

Conference Location: Plymouth, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: September 12, 2014
Conference Ends: September 13, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: June 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Kevin Brazil

Back to Top





T. S. Eliot Society


The 35th Annual Meeting of the T. S. Eliot Society <br />St. Louis, September 19-21, 2014 <br /> <br />The Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at the annual meeting in St. Louis. Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be emailed by June 13, 2014, to the President, Michael Coyle (mcoyle@colgate.edu). <br /> <br />We also invite participants in a peer seminar at the annual meeting. This year's seminar, led by T. Austin Graham (Columbia), will be on "Eliot at the Limits of History and Historicism." To enroll in the seminar, email Frances Dickey at dickeyf@missouri.edu. The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close July 15. Seminarians will submit 4-5 page position papers by email, no later than September 1. <br /> <br />For further information on the Eliot Society and the annual meeting, please visit our website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot).

Conference Location: St. Louis, USA
Conference Starts: September 19, 2014
Conference Ends: September 21, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: June 13, 2014

For more information, contact: Michael Coyle

Back to Top





Steel Industry: Word, Image, Space (MSA 16)


Proposals are elicited for a Roundtable Panel on the impact of the Steel Industry on the literary, visual and spatial arts. Please send abstracts of 250 words to Elisabeth Joyce.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 07, 2014

For more information, contact: Elisabeth Joyce

Back to Top





Hiding in Plain Sight: Queerness, Publicity, and Privacy


The increasing visibility queerness enjoyed in the 20th century gave rise to complex dynamics of publicity and privacy, many of which have only begun to receive critical attention relatively recently -- a phenomenon that, itself, belongs to those same dynamics. From Hart Crane and Frank O’Hara deploying the verbal codes of queer cruising to Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes more frankly articulating same-sex desire, modernist writing is rife with queerness, often hiding in plain sight. This panel will examine the modern confluence of queer visibility and invisibility: how do writers in the period navigate these waters, and how can critics best approach them? What are the consequences, for the works and their authors, of risking visibility in this era, and what are the risks (or rewards) of invisibility? How does queer modernism offer alternative configurations -- overlaps, identity, oblique relationships -- for these ostensible opposites? What do queer texts from the first half of the century offer to critics and practitioners today? <br /> <br />Send an abstract and brief bio note to victoria.brockmeier@gmail.com by May 1, and feel free to write with any questions.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2014

For more information, contact: Victoria Brockmeier

Back to Top





Modernists and Modernism in the Biographical Novel


The biographical novel is unique in that it blends two seemingly contradictory activities, the non-fictional act of accurately representing the biographical subject and the fictional act of inventing characters and scenes. Before the 1980s, there were only a few significant biographical novels. But in the 1990s, there was a veritable explosion of this genre of fiction. A disproportionate number of contemporary biographical novels feature modernist writers, such as Virginia Woolf, Henry James, Frida Kahlo, Stephen Crane, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Rainer Maria Rilke, Walter Benjamin, Zelda Fitzgerald, and Sergey Nabakov, to name just a notable few. <br /> Is it significant that modernists and modernism figure so centrally in contemporary biographical novels? To what degree did modernist ideas give birth to the contemporary biographical novel? How is the biographical novel enabling us to re-imagine modernists and modernism? What prevented prominent modernists from authoring biographical novels? On this panel, we will define the nature of this genre of fiction, provide an overview of its evolution, clarify how it relates to modernists and modernism, and analyze a few biographical novels. <br /> Please submit a 250-word abstract and a CV to Michael Lackey (lacke010@morris.umn.edu) by May 2nd. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2014

For more information, contact: Michael Lackey

Back to Top





Modernist Waste Streams (MSA 16)


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defines a "waste stream" as "The total flow of solid waste from homes, businesses, institutions, and manufacturing plants that is recycled, burned, or disposed of in landfills, or segments thereof such as the 'residential waste stream' or the 'recyclable waste stream.'" This panel deploys this term to address the relationship between production, consumption, and waste that existed at the start of the twentieth century. It invites papers from all disciplines that examine modernist attitudes toward waste and abundance. Possible topics include depictions of waste in Eliot, Joyce, Beckett, etc.; the recycling of waste in Cubist collages and Surrealist objets trouves; and representations of the monumental waste that is associated with modern warfare. Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Alexander McKee at abmckee@udel.edu by May 2.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2014

For more information, contact: Alexander McKee

Back to Top





The Concept of Late Modernism (MSA 16)


The Concept of Late Modernism <br /> <br />Periodization provides one of modernism’s most turbulent sites of confluence and division. In recent years, critical interest in periodizing modernism has been particularly attentive to the idea of a “late modernism” in literary studies. Because the methods and topics by which this act of division continue to differ, this panel offers a platform for articulating the plurality of approaches to this emerging concept, as well as a venue for considering the merits and risks of introducing an intermediary term in twentieth-century literary history. Possible topics include the chronological limits of late modernism, and the punctual importance of the Depression or World War II to modernist histories; individual authors whose works constitute an important signal of late modernism; the developing relation between American and English modernisms; Jameson’s definition of late modernism as the emergence of an “aesthetic ideology of modernism” and the institutional reception of modernism; returning to and rethinking the postmodernism debates. Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Ian Afflerbach at iafflerbach@ucdavis.edu by May 2. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2014

For more information, contact: Ian Afflerbach

Back to Top





The Other Senses of Modernism (MSA 16)


This CFP is for MSA 16 <br />The Other Senses of Modernism <br /> <br />While there has been increasing attention to the senses more generally and to the ‘lower’ senses of smell, taste, and touch in recent years, it is pretty clear that most scholarship on modernism that focuses on sensation is visually (and to a lesser extent aurally) oriented. Attention to the visual in modernist scholarship has allowed us to ask important questions about surface and glamour, affect and image, the urban landscape and the commodity, race and sexuality. But our largely visual version of modernism has also, perhaps, not allowed us to conceptualize and encounter the other senses of modernism. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to open up new questions about literature and culture in the first half of the 20th century through attention to stimuli that isn’t, or isn’t only, visual. How might race feel different if we focused on representations of its tactile dimensions? How would we re-think modernist aesthetics through the glamour of perfume? What does cosmopolitanism taste like? By asking questions about representations of the other senses, this panel would seek to think of modernism differently - as, for example, engaging and even producing new forms of intimacy and sensation. Papers with a different of methodological commitments and concerns are very welcome, including theoretical work (engaging folks like Merleau-Ponty and Serres); archival work on material culture or marginalized texts; and work on modernism’s most canonical poetry and prose. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Yaron Aronowicz yaronowi@princeton.edu by May 2nd. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2014

For more information, contact: Yaron Aronowicz

Back to Top





Fun with Dick and Jane: Gender and Childhood


Call for Papers - “Fun with Dick and Jane: Gender and Childhood” <br />A Gender Studies Conference at the University of Notre Dame <br />South Bend, Indiana <br />December 4-6, 2014 <br /> <br />In recent years, there has been great interest in questions of gender and childhood, ranging from issues around boys wearing princess costumes to school; to Disney princess culture; to parents refusing to announce a baby’s biological sex; to pre-teen children coming out as gay, lesbian, and queer; to toy companies marketing toys by gender; to gender-related bullying, and more. <br /> <br />How are children gendered? How do we account for transgender children? How have ideas about girls and boys changed historically? How are children hailed as gendered consumers? How do schools inculcate ideas about gender? How do children’s books promote ideas about gender? How do changing ideas about parenting relate to children’s gendering? <br /> <br />This conference seeks to explore issues of gender and childhood through multiple lenses and from a wide range of disciplines. We welcome papers on gender and childhood in media, literature, history, anthropology, biology, architecture, philosophy, art history, sociology, education, and more. We are especially open to interdisciplinary approaches. <br /> <br />Topics might include: <br /> <br />Representations of children in film, children’s books, adult books, TV shows, paintings, photography. etc.; <br />Childhood spectatorship and fandoms; <br />Gendered childhood spaces; <br />Gendered toys and games; <br />Ideologies of childhood sexuality; <br />Parenting books and gender; <br />Children and gay parents; <br />Sports and gender; <br />Children’s fashion; <br />Reality TV and children’s gender; <br />Children’s fiction and gender; <br />Transgender children; <br />Children’s own media and internet practices; <br />Journalism and childhood; <br />Gender and bullying; <br />Transnational gender identities; <br />Schooling practices. <br /> <br />Proposals should consist of a 200 word abstract of the paper, a list of three keywords, and a brief biographical statement listing your title, the name of your college or university, and your areas of research and writing. Proposals for creative work – poetry, short stories, short films, will be considered. <br /> <br />Please indicate technology needs, such as Power Point or DVD. <br /> <br />Proposals are due by May 1, 2014 <br /> <br />Send proposals to: <br /> <br />https://notredame-web.ungerboeck.com/spa/spa_p1_authors.aspx?oc=10&cc=114020403651 <br /> <br />Questions can be addressed to: Pamela Wojcik, Director of Gender Studies, The University of Notre Dame, by email, with the subject line “Gender and Childhood”: Pamela.Wojcik.5@nd.edu <br />

Conference Location: South Bend IN, United States
Conference Starts: December 04, 2014
Conference Ends: December 06, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Pam Wojcik, Director of Gender Studies, Notre Dame

Back to Top





Modernism, Blackness, and Futurity (MSA16)


This panel speaks to long-standing modernist questions about the individual's relationship with time. High modernist writers from James Joyce, to T.S. Eliot, to Virginia Woolf rightfully urge us to reconsider the role time plays in our conceptions of identity. Such authors experiment with an illegible and/or insecure future, which, consequently, opens up the present as a spatio-temporal dimension to be thoroughly explored and excavated. Virginia Woolf's novel, Mrs. Dalloway, famously illustrates the notion of an incomprehensible future and how one lives his or her life under these conditions. <br /> <br />The papers given at this panel on the intersection of modernism, blackness, and futurity examine how modernist writers take up "blackness" as a framework in thinking about modes of living that do not necessarily revolve around a guarantee of life’s continuation. What these papers reconsider is how the absence of a legible future informs identity. Black diasporic peoples have historically been denied the certainty of a future, forced to move through history amidst this uncertainty. What is of critical importance is an investigation into how writers and artists aesthetically represent the tension between black presentism/imagined futurity. <br /> <br />A key question this panel explores is this: How does the modernist aesthetic address the endangered futures of black diasporic peoples? What are the literary devices and modes of narration that figure prominently in works on black (non)futurity? As the terminology in this panel description makes apparent, theorists such as Lee Edelman, José E Muñoz, and Jack Halberstam may offer useful tools in conceptualizing the intersection of identity formations, modernism, and futurity. However, papers are not limited to these scholars. <br /> <br />This panel openly welcomes interdisciplinary work (film, digital, literature, visual art, music, etc) and would also favor papers that deal with intersectionality (simultaneous discussions on race, gender, sexuality, and class). Possible themes that can be connected to black futurity discourses include: <br /> <br />The death/life binary <br />Aesthetic representations of risk, chance, or luck <br />Spatiality and futurity <br />Gender and futurity <br />Black/white binary <br />Side by side comparison of different mediums addressing black futurity <br />Authorship and Textuality <br />Linguistics <br />Print Culture <br /> <br />Questions are welcome. Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief scholarly biography by May 1st to Lucy Mensah: lucy.k.mensah@vanderbilt.edu <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Lucy Mensah

Back to Top





Modernism and Found Objects (MSA16)


Found objects are a major feature of modernist art, whether the plastic arts or urban narratives. Object-centered considerations of literary modernism vary from the placement of materials within texts (as with the poetry of Marianne Moore) to the detournement of objects by the later avant-gardes (such as the Situationists) What does the modernist fascination with mundane objects tell us about the affect of the collector, or the artist, or modernist affect more generally? What does the representation of lost and found objects, souvenirs, curios, and window displays disclose about modernism? What do these narratives suggest about the perceived role of the modern metropolis in reproducing capitalism? This panel invites papers discussing the practice and aesthetic uses of the found object in the city. Papers that seek to elaborate on modernist theories regarding the collector and collecting are also welcome. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 400 words and a short CV to Barry J. Faulk (bfaulk@fsu.edu) and Adam R. McKee (amckee@fsu.edu) by April 30th.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Barry Faulk and Adam McKee

Back to Top





Artistic Modernism and the Confluences of Interdisciplinarity


Inspired by the MSA's theme "Confluence and Division," this panel asks, what does interdisciplinarity in the context of artistic modernism mean? In what ways is interdisciplinarity itself a meeting or a flow between the disciplines, and in what ways, despite all its best efforts, is it nonetheless rotted in presumed divisions between fields and media? <br /> <br />Such divisions between disciplines are in some ways part of the heritage of Greenbergian formalism, but the emphasis on context in the "new art history" - not to mention its own interdisciplinary methodologies - enabled a broader recognition of a range of practices as worthy of analysis. The expanded awareness of the role of interdisciplinarity in artistic theory and practice not only corresponded with a shift from artistic modernism to post-modernism and then the contemporary, but it also opened the door for a reassessment of the role played by interdisciplinary interactions in modernism. <br /> <br />It is clear that the art world's emphasis on Greenbergian modernism in effect concealed the actual interdisciplinarity that thrived in plain sight. This panel seeks to draw further attention to previously un- or under-recognized examples of such interdisciplinary approaches that existed at the heart of the theories and practices of artistic modernism. Examples include: art historians such as the America Meyer Schapiro who sought theoretical inspiration in fields including anthropology, psychology and linguistics, among others; sculptors such as Isamu Noguchi who constructed stage sets for Martha Graham's choreographies; and Dadaists such as Raoul Hausmann who created photomontages as well as performance art. <br /> <br />In some cases, the nature of interdisciplinary work was collaborative; each individual created according to their specialization and contributed to the whole. In other cases, the individual worked in a cross-disciplinary manner, engaging fields in ways that bridged the distinctions between them. The impetuses for interdisciplinary work among modernists were multiple. In some instances, individuals saw the work being done in other disciplines as a possible means to avoiding gendered or racial assumptions. In other examples, interdisciplinary investigations were a means to challenge hierarchies ensconced within their own fields, or even to model future collaborative ideals. By bringing together papers that address interdisciplinary work in artistic modernism, this panel seeks to deepen our understanding of the cultural production that countered the dichotomies and hierarchies that used to be seen as inherent to modernism. <br /> <br />This panel welcomes papers on topics in the visual and performing arts as well as in theory and criticism, philosophy, and historiography. <br /> <br />Send a brief abstract (about 200 words) and a CV to Susan Funkenstein (s.funkenstein@yahoo.com) and Cindy Persinger (persinger@calu.edu) by May 1, 2014. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Susan Funkenstein

Back to Top





Anna Kavan Symposium


ANNA KAVAN: HISTORICAL CONTEXT, INFLUENCES AND LEGACY <br />11th September 2014 <br /> <br />A one-day symposium at the Institute of English Studies in association with Liverpool John Moores University Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History and Peter Owen Publishers <br /> <br />CALL FOR PAPERS <br />Anna Kavan's publication history spans from her early novels under the name Helen Ferguson in the late 1920s and early 1930s to her last work which won Brian Aldiss'€prize for 'Sci-Fi Novel of the Year'€in 1967. Her own life story has been widely reported in magazine articles, book reviews and popular biography, but there has been little serious scholarly attention to her writing. The often sensationalized focus on Kavan’s biography, particularly her adoption of her own fictional character's name, her long-term heroin addiction, and her psychological difficulties, has overshadowed serious critical attention to her work. Yet, her writing continues to be published in English and translation, to hold fascination for new generations of readers, and to interest or influence other writers and artists. This symposium aims to bring together scholars with an interest in Kavan to promote an increasing academic focus on her work. The day will be a forum for knowledge sharing, with the broad aims of historicizing Kavan's work, situating her within the literary and intellectual context of her times, and charting her legacy as a writer. The symposium will close with a public event in the evening at which leading contemporary writers will discuss Anna Kavan's work in relation to their own writing. <br /> <br />The symposium will primarily focus on Kavan's fictional writing, but also welcomes those working on her biography, her journalism, her little-studied artwork and her philosophical or intellectual influences. Papers might include the following topics: <br />- Comparative readings of Kavan's fiction with her contemporaries and the authors who have admired her since (e.g. Doris Lessing, J G Ballard, Anais Nin, Maggie Gee). <br />- Connections/differences between her writing as Helen Ferguson/ Anna Kavan. <br />- High Modernist influences on Kavan's work. <br />- Readings of Kavan's fiction that historicize her writing in the context of the Second World War, the Cold War and 1960s counterculture. <br />- Kavan's theoretical or philosophical influences. <br />- Feminist readings and reassessments of Kavan's work. <br />- Examination of the (post-)colonial aspects of Kavan's fiction and journalism. <br />- Kavan's engagement with visual cultures, including her own artwork. <br />- Studies of Kavan's use of form (especially the short story) and narrative style (especially her distinctive uses of first and third person narrative). <br />- Theories of autobiography and fiction and their impact on the reception of Kavan's life and work. <br />- Kavan's writing of madness, asylum incarceration and opiate addiction. <br />- Kavan's literary networks (e.g. her friendships with Rhys Davies, Kay Dick, Sylvia Townsend-Warner and others, and her associations with Cyril Connolly and Jonathan Cape). <br />- Issues of genre including interpretations of Kavan's work as 'Science Fiction'. <br />- Kavan's journalism (in Horizon) and its relation to her fictional writing. <br />- Other writers' engagement with Kavan and the legacy of her work. <br /> <br />Presentations should take the form of 20-minute papers. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words to info@annakavan.org.uk by 30 April 2014. <br />For further information visit http://annakavansymposium.wordpress.com/ <br />

Conference Location: London, UK
Conference Starts: September 11, 2014
Conference Ends: September 11, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2014

For more information, contact: http://annakavansymposium.wordpress.com/

Back to Top





Clothes, Working Lives and Social Change, 1880–1939


Call for Papers: Clothes, Working Lives and Social Change, 1880–1939 <br />Two-Day International Conference <br />Bishopsgate Institute, London <br />12–13 September 2014 <br /> <br />Confirmed Keynote Speakers: <br />Professor Eugenia Paulicelli (Queen’s College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York) <br />Professor Lou Taylor (University of Brighton) <br /> <br />This cross-disciplinary conference explores the relationship between work, clothes and social change at the turn of the twentieth century. <br /> <br />During the long nineteenth century mechanized manufacturing, accelerated modes of production and innovative trades and industries created employment possibilities for an increasingly professionalized workforce. While factory and clerical workers, shop girls and other members of a newly established workforce faced changing working hours and environments, a transformation of clothes paralleled this revolution in trades and industries. New vocations required new vestments at a time when the affordability of mass-produced clothing launched the ready-to-wear industry. Social mobility expressed itself in new sartorial patterns and specific uniforms or dresses became the markers of professional identity and social mobility. At the turn of the twentieth century the histories of dress and labour shared many common threads. <br /> <br />Hosted by the Bishopsgate Institute in London’s East End, this interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from the Humanities, the Social Sciences and the Creative Arts who have research interests in the intersecting histories of clothes and labour at the turn of the twentieth century. <br /> <br />Topics include but are by no means restricted to: <br /> <br />• Sweated Labour and the Clothing Industry <br />• Clothes and the New Workforce (especially working women) <br />• Work in the Fashion Industry (seamstresses, models, designers) <br />• Haute Couture versus Ready-to-Wear Garments <br />• Film Stars, Celebrity Culture and Clothes <br />• Textiles and Communities of Immigrant Workers (particularly London’s East End) <br />• Uniforms <br />• The Politics of Fashion and the Coding of Clothes <br />• Clothing, Work and Consumption (especially in times of war) <br />• Work and Rural Dress <br /> <br />The conference organizers invite paper proposals of 300 words by 30 April 2014. Please email abstracts to tailoredtrades@exeter.ac.uk. <br /> <br />This conference is part of a series of research events on the interconnected histories of clothes and labour funded by the AHRC Connected Communities programme: http://tailoredtrades.exeter.ac.uk/.

Conference Location: London, UK
Conference Starts: September 12, 2014
Conference Ends: September 13, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2014

For more information, contact: VIke Martina Plock

Back to Top





Modernism's Divided Selves: Politics and Aesthetics in the 1930s


This panel examines the consequences and possibilities sparked by tensions between modernist aesthetics and politics in the 1930s. We want to recover the political and aesthetic potency of modernists not typically regarded as political or not recognized as having commitments to social transformation. “Divided selves” not only refers to the psychological fractures experienced by modernists dwelling on the margins of public life, but also expresses our effort to complexly rethink -- both against the grain and on the surface -- the prevailing narratives regarding how modernist writers engage the socio-political. Proposals with an interdisciplinary or gender studies focus are especially welcome. Please email 100 word proposal and brief biography to zemgulys@umich.edu (Andrea Zemgulys). We are seeking 1-4 papers to either complete a single panel or to create a joint panel proposal.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Andrea Zemgulys

Back to Top





&quot;Extra! Extra!&quot; Film, Civics, and Supernumerary Modernism


This CFP, for the upcoming MSA conference in Pittsburgh, invites abstracts for a panel focused on film as a civic industry that traffics in images of solidarity, civic involvement, mass citizenship, or social/economic exclusion. Work on film as "vernacular modernism" (as Miriam Hansen wrote) has envisioned cinema as both a "social horizon of experience" and an effort to articulate new modes of sensory perception--€”a tension produced by, but also critical of, Fordist modes of cultural and economic production. Beyond Fordism, the cinema has long been seen to engage in crowd control and crowd production, both within the pictures and within theater audiences: whether in Kracauer'€™s account of the Mass Ornament, Eisenstein'€™s effort at mass-mobilization, or Dali and Buñuel'€™s use of a "€œgob of spit in the face of art" to create an oppositional counterpublic. The culture industry, the propaganda film, market segmentation, or supernumerary categories such as the "extra" represent additional ways in which film, as art form and as industry, ascribes human value. <br /> <br />How, then, does cinema's capacity simultaneously to mobilize the many (the mass, the crowd, the multitude) or to highlight the few (the star, the picture personality) produce accounts of civic comportment or dispensability? How did early-twentieth-century film define which populations, bodies, classes of person, or modes of experience contributed to the public good? How do filmic treatments of human individuals, or the cinema's use of individuals in production, help us to understand modernist publics and counterpublics in other aesthetic or social spheres? <br /> <br />Papers on Hollywood cinema, avant-garde film, animation, film in relation to progressive or radical movements, or other related topics would be welcome. Please submit an abstract of 300 words and a short bio to Katherine Fusco (kfusco@unr.edu) or Josh Epstein (joshua.epstein@tamucc.edu) by April 30.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Josh Epstein

Back to Top





New Modernist Studies and Feminist Pedagogy


This session will consider how methodologies of new modernist studies—such as recovery work, interdisciplinary studies, transnational studies, and print and material culture studies—can support a critical, feminist pedagogy in the college classroom. As bell hooks writes in “Toward a Revolutionary Feminist Pedagogy,” students “long for a context where their subjective needs can be integrated with study, where the primary focus is a broader spectrum of ideas and modes of inquiry, in short a dialectical context where there is serious and rigorous critical exchange” (51). Although the inquiries enabled by new modernist methodologies seemingly lend themselves well to such a feminist pedagogy, little theoretical work has been done developing this link. <br /> <br />As these methodologies receive more attention, however, and become increasingly served by digital humanities and shared online resources, scholars are seeking such a critical exchange in their classrooms. In this roundtable, we will address how the subjects and approaches of new modernist studies can construct a decentered, dynamic, and mutually supportive learning environment, both giving voice to the marginalized and making such voices essential to the narrative of modernism as presented in the classroom and beyond. In the 2009 issue of Modernism/Modernity devoted to teaching, Helen Sword writes, “In a field of study that openly welcomes international, multicultural, and interdisciplinary approaches, why has pedagogy remained such a persistently untrendy--indeed, virtually taboo--subject?” (470). Given that this question has yet to be fully addressed, this roundtable aims to forge clearer connections between new modernist studies and classroom work. <br /> <br />We will invite discussion related to feminism and queer studies as well as additional ways in which modernism has been reframed to include a range of race and national identities and influences related to mass culture. Our intention is that the subjects and pedagogical approaches considered by the roundtable reflect the broad range of students in the contemporary college classroom, likewise more accurately resembling the range of influences in play during the modernist period. We will also address how active learning derived from new modernist methodologies further raises concerns about accessibility and inequality, threatening to reinscribe the very limitations both new modernist studies and critical pedagogy have attempted to eliminate. <br /> <br />Questions to be considered include: <br /> <br />How have new modernist practices been used to support feminist or queer pedagogy in the classroom? <br /> <br />What possibilities for students’ construction of knowledge do new modernist practices open? What are the ethical and practical issues inherent to student scholarship in this subfield? <br /> <br />Do new approaches such as those in the digital humanities enable greater connections between new modernist studies and feminist pedagogy? <br /> <br />How might feminist practices derived from new modernist studies respond to the challenges facing higher education including rising tuitions, the impact of MOOCs, and the increasing neoliberalism of many university systems? <br /> <br />How might new modernist studies as a field be enriched by research in critical or feminist pedagogy? How might research in feminist or critical pedagogy be enriched by new modernist studies? <br /> <br />How does new modernist studies give voice to the marginalized and expand the reaches of women’s studies, race studies, and queer studies from theme-based classes to cross-curriculum integration? <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250 words to Laurel Harris at laurel_e_harris@yahoo.com. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Laurel Harris

Back to Top





MSA 16: Modernism in Contemporary Mainstream Media


How are modernist cultures, coteries, and spaces re-imagined in contemporary texts (considered broadly)? The modernist period, its arts in particular but its broader spheres of culture as well, has been an object of fascination and re-staging since before it ended–-and no less so in recent years, as evidenced by the popularity of Downton Abbey, Boardwalk Empire, and The Great Gatsby (among others). How do these recent reincarnations draw on their predecessors? What does modernism–-its art networks, entertainments, crime, wars, sexuality, scandals, political movements, scientific and technological developments etc.–mean today, as channeled by popular media? What opportunities and problems do adaptations pose for scholars? Approaches from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives welcome. <br /> <br />Submit a 300-word abstract and a 1-page CV to jpn12@psu.edu (Jennifer Nesbitt) by April 28, 2014. Inquiries welcome. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 28, 2014

For more information, contact: Jennifer Nesbitt

Back to Top





Confluence of Minds: Cognitive Modernisms (MSA 16)


In the last 35 years Theory of Mind (ToM) has been the object of intense investigation in developmental psychology, anthropogeny and cognitive neuroscience, producing a number of related concepts to develop our understanding of how we impute mental states to ourselves and others. Examples of such concepts are mentalizing, mindreading, mirroring, we-mode and metacognition. Many of the findings in the cognitive study of ToM converge with literary knowledge on the epistemology of mind. For an author'€™s imaginative capacity to impute mental states to others is, of course, foundational to creating character. 'My name is Brown. Catch me if you can', so Woolf wrote of the elusive consciousness the novelist tries to capture when attempting to create a character that comes alive on the page. ToM is also central to plot for each character'€™s ability (or inability) to predict and understand their own and others'€™ behavior creates much of the story upon which a large part of fiction is based. While such issues of intersubjectivity have been central to literature in general, it became a central modernist preoccupation. Extremely complex and variable levels of implicit mindreading are found in, for example, the mutual silent understanding between Adam and Maggie Verver in Henry James'€™s The Golden Bowl; the intersubjectivity of Bernard, Susan, Neville, Jinny, Rhoda and Louis in Virginia Woolf'€™s The Waves; and Marlow'€™s ability to take the perspective of Kurtz, Jim and Flora in the works of Conrad. This panel on '€˜Confluence of Minds'™ proposes to examine representations and exemplifications of cognitive confluence in modernist fiction. <br /> <br />Potential paper topics include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />Modernist representations of cognitive confluence <br />Cognitive confluence between reader and character <br />Linguistic confluence in modernist fiction <br />Cognitive dissonance <br />The cognitive model of modernism <br />Cognitive sympathy <br />Confluence of minds <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 28, 2014

For more information, contact: sowon.park@ell.ox.ac.uk

Back to Top





Complexity Aesthetics: The Arts and Humanities as Complex Adaptive Systems


In recent years models of complex adaptive systems have enhanced understanding of fields as diverse as biology, information theory, sociology, city planning and economics. Incorporating such sub-fields as emergent phenomena, networks, contagion theory, self-organizational swarms, agent-based modeling, interfaciality, autopoiesis (biological, social and conceptual), recursive causality and more, complex adaptive models would seem also to offer compelling frameworks for the consideration of the arts and humanities in terms of practice, criticism and history. <br /> <br />Exploring MSA 16'€™s theme of Confluence and Division, this panel will consider the following questions: Can the contemporary art world, now allegedly absent a dominant discursive framework, justifiably be considered a complex adaptive system? Do emergent properties scale across domains, e.g. from the microscale subjective experience of literature to the macroscale crystallization of genres, styles and discourses? How might network topology correlate with narratives and metanarrativity? How might we articulate the differential tensions between non-deterministic swarm formation and medium-specific or genre boundary differentiation? Where to position critique within a system of dynamic feedback equilibria among and between creative fields? This session invites paper proposals that address the topics and questions above, or those involving the arts and humanities in relation to complexity theory in general.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 27, 2014

For more information, contact: Jason Hoelscher

Back to Top





Problems and Solutions for Modernist Digital Humanities (Roundtable)


Problems and Solutions for Modernist Digital Humanities (Roundtable) <br /> <br />At MLA 2014’s “Beyond the Digital: Pattern Recognition and Interpretation” panel, the first question from the audience was, “Why are so many of these projects modernist? What is it about modernism that attracted the presenters?” Modernism, indeed, with its textually diverse and expanding canon, its relative immunity to copyright problems, its attention to formal qualities, and its following of academics dedicated to “making it new,” has attracted perhaps a disproportionate amount of attention from digital humanists. As a result, modernist digital scholarship and pedagogy can provide an ideal stage for hypothesizing best practices at a time when the digital humanities is still, from an institutional standpoint, very much in transition from the “next big thing” to a staple feature of the humanities. <br /> <br />From within the digital humanities, demand for such hypotheses has arisen as the field has become increasingly self-aware of what has been called the “dark side” of the digital humanities. In his introduction to Debates in the Digital Humanities (2012), Matthew K. Gold lauds the collected essays for making “pointed critiques at DH for a variety of ills: a lack of attention to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality; a preference for research-driven projects over pedagogical ones; an absence of political commitment; an inadequate level of diversity among its practitioners; an inability to address texts under copyright; and an institutional concentration in well-funded research universities.” As the digital humanities spread, so will these concerns. <br /> <br />This roundtable aims to address these problems specifically from the perspective of modernist studies. Each presenter will identify one problem in modernist digital humanities and suggest a solution to this problem in a five- to seven-minute presentation. Proposals should focus, as much as possible, the particular challenges presented by modernism for digital study. Please submit a 250-word abstract that identifies one problem and proposes a solution, along with a short biographical statement, to shawna.ross@asu.edu by April 1, 2014. <br /> <br />Topics might include: <br /> <br />* Obstacles to digital literary criticism arising from the specific formal qualities or cultural histories of modernism <br /> <br />* Potential changes to the modernist canon (or a re-entrenchment of a narrow canon) as a result of digital alt-canon building <br /> <br />* Barriers to resource production or collaboration created by the interdisciplinary nature of modernism <br /> <br />* Copyright issues involving late modernist texts or texts involving audio, video, or image <br /> <br />* Institutional resistances or pressures that might influence the future of modernist criticism or pedagogy <br /> <br />* Difficulties of obtaining software/programming training (digital skills acquisition), especially with an eye to “building” or “making” modernist projects <br /> <br />* Challenges for graduate education, from project development to the job hunt, either from the perspective of the graduate student or dissertation director <br /> <br />* Implications of resource allocation or attention for the continued development of cosmopolitan, transnational, postcolonial, or planetary modernisms <br /> <br />* The “digital divide” (questions of access, specifically to modernism), manifested in asymmetries across races, classes, genders, sexualities, or nationalities <br /> <br />* Pedagogical or administrative challenges of specific institutional instantiations of modernist study (community colleges, liberal arts colleges, branch campuses, et cetera) <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014

For more information, contact: Shawna Ross

Back to Top





Modernism and Climate Change


This is a CFP for the upcoming MSA 16 conference in Pittsburgh for a panel called "Modernism and Climate Change." This panel will examine modernist representations of climate and climatic events, particularly as they explore both the individual’s relationship to climate and the ways in which climatic events are understood, represented, and responded to across modernist literature and culture. Paper proposals are welcome that address any of the following issues: how are the climate and climatic events and effects—such as heat waves, floods, droughts, and extreme meteorological events-- represented in specific modernist texts? How do individuals respond to and understand such events? How are modernist subjects implicated in and shaped by climate? What do modernist representations of climate say about the role of the humanities more generally in ongoing accounts of climate and climate change? How can we move beyond discussion of such phenomena as simply mere background and setting? Please submit paper proposals of 200-250 words to jmcintyre@upei.ca by 5 pm on Wednesday April 25th. <br /> <br />Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, US <br />Conference Starts: November 6, 2014 <br />Conference Ends: November 9, 2014 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014 <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014

For more information, contact: John McIntyre

Back to Top





Made for Reproduction


When an art object is photographically reproduced on the printed page, it undergoes a series of transformations: three-dimensional objects become two-dimensional, color images become black and white, large objects become small, and all reproductions of objects require that the viewer take an interpretive leap of faith to accept that the diminutive, printed image is a stand-in for its material counterpart in the world. The Dadaists were among the first artists to break with the habitual acceptance of these conditions, recognizing that the artwork in reproduction was something distinct; possibly a category of production unto itself. This panel seeks papers that explore the work of early twentieth century visual artists, including Dadaists, Surrealists, and others who engaged the potential of reproduction by creating works that explored these transformations, engaging, for example, the materiality of the print publication—its inky, opaque, horizontal nature—or, inversely, its flatness and dematerializing effects. Do certain artworks made for reproduction probe the poetic potential of the image's semiological break from its material referent? Might they respond to the anxiety implicit in this rupture? Do such interests arise in relation to particular historical, social, political, cultural, and economic contexts? If an artwork in reproduction is removed from exchange value, is it always politically charged? Does literature produced for publication serve as a model for its visual counterpart? Papers on well-known artists such as Max Ernst, John Heartfield or László Moholy-Nagy, or writers/theorists such as Louis Aragon and Walter Benjamin are welcome, as are those on less familiar figures working across visual and verbal fields. <br /> <br />Please send a preliminary abstract of 1-2 double-spaced pages and a CV by April 25, 2014 to Emily Hage and Adrian Sudhalter at ehage@sju.edu and sudhalter@nyu.edu.

Conference Location: Pittsburg, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014

For more information, contact: Emily Hage

Back to Top





Frankfurt School Critical Theory in the 21st Century (MSA 16)


Once considered a touchstone of modernist aesthetics, politics, ethics, and cultural criticism, the critical theory of the Frankfurt School has seen its reputation suffer in the latter portion of the 20th century, in part because of its pessimism towards or outright dismissal of “mass culture,” as well as the perception that its purview is too narrowly European. More recent scholarship has begun to revalue the School’s critical theory and argue for its contemporary significance, especially for ecocriticism and postcolonial aesthetics and politics. <br /> <br />This panel proposes to participate in that work of revaluation by interrogating the School's continuing relevance from a global perspective and considering what explanatory power its critical theory possesses beyond the confines of European modernism. In doing so, the panel will explore the confluences and divisions between modernist theory and the post-War, postcolonial world. Theoretical papers are welcome, as are interdisciplinary papers that treat aesthetic, political, ethical, cultural, or environmental topics together, or papers that read Frankfurt School critical theory in conjunction with specific literary, artistic, or popular cultural works or phenomena. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Jonathan Feinberg at jof1@pitt.edu by April 25th. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014

For more information, contact: Jonathan Feinberg

Back to Top





Immunity, Contagion, and Modernist Subjectivity


Modernity marks the advent of sophisticated medical techniques designed to isolate and anticipate local and global epidemiological threats. But the concepts of immunity and contagion go beyond medical categories of health and disease to structure historical and contemporary understandings of what it means to be a subject in the modern world. This panel will consider literary and artistic representations and cultural instances of immunity and contagion and their role in the construction of modernist subjectivity. <br /> <br />Papers might address contagion theory, local and global health strategies (e.g., technologies such as vaccination, quarantine, and GIS mapping), affect theory, infrastructure (e.g., sewer systems, housing), technology, finance, and other topics. Please send a 300-word abstract and a CV by April 25 to Elizabeth Covington, elizabeth.covington@vanderbilt.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2014

For more information, contact: Elizabeth Covington

Back to Top





Rethinking Modernist Novel Theory (MSA 16)


Nicholas Dames concludes The Physiology of the Novel: Reading, Neural Science, and the Form of Victorian Fiction (2007) by imagining I.A. Richards as the heir of G.H. Lewes, Alexander Bain, and other 19th-century thinkers who placed the reader at the center of novel theory and defined the genre in terms of its imagined effects on readers. Dames’s analysis of Richards is suggestive in how it challenges our received genealogy of novel theory, in which modernists from James on removed the reader as a topic, replaced it with form and point of view, and transferred theoretical emphasis from the affect and physiology of the reader to the epistemology of the text itself. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to build on Dames’s work by exploring modernists’ novel theory from new perspectives. What hidden confluences and divisions can we trace between modernists or from modernism across history of novel theory? What new light can we cast on the old chestnuts of modernist novel theory--point of view, spatial form, difficulty, the common reader, flat and round characters, and life versus form, to name a few? What new texts or concepts can we add to modernism’s canon of novel theory? Papers might consider academic novel theorists (Percy Lubbock, Q.D. Leavis, F.R. Leavis, Arthur Quiller Couch, Carl Grabo, etc.), the novel theory produced by novelists (Wyndham Lewis, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, E.M. Forster, Vernon Lee, and D.H. Lawrence, to name just a few), novel theory in little magazines or reviews, theories of highbrow/middlebrow, affect in novel reading, behaviorism or psychology in novel theory, relations between media in genre theories, novel versus poetry in modernism, modernism’s relation to New Criticism, etc. <br /> <br />Please send inquiries or 250-word abstracts and brief biographical notes by April 20, 2014, to Heather Fielding at heathervf@gmail.com. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Heather Fielding

Back to Top





Cosmological Confluences


We are interested in exploring astronomy in the twentieth century as a compelling framework for conceptualizing "œimaginary homelands," to borrow Rushdie's phrase, or, to borrow Heaney's phrase, negotiating the sense of being "œlost, / Unhappy and at home." Astronomical metaphors frequently appear in modernist and contemporary texts concerned with ideas of "home." Writers turn to astronomy to work through critical themes of the century: the universal versus the particular, temporal and cultural relativity, the overlap between the familiar and the frightening, and more. Ultimately, to connect our proposal to the conference theme, we see the discourse of astronomy as a way for authors to explore earthly divisions from the vantage point of astronomical divergence, with the goal of arriving at new forms of convergence. All critical perspectives welcome. Please email a 250-word abstract with a 1-page CV to Margaret Greaves at mgreave@emory.edu and Sumita Chakraborty at sumita.chakraborty@emory.edu by 20 April 2014.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Margaret Greaves

Back to Top





The Function of Modernist Criticism (in Its Time and Ours)


The Function of Modernist Criticism (in Its Time and Ours) – MSA 16 (Nov 6-9, 2014,Pittsburgh, PA) <br /> <br />In Criticism in the Wilderness (1980), Geoffrey Hartman argued that criticism exists within literature. Working under this assumption – that criticism functions as a part of literary history – this panel asks how the study of critics writing during the first half of the 20th century help us understand both the poetry and fiction of that period (or art in general) and/or help us come to terms with our tasks as scholars in the 21st century. In what ways, in other words, does the criticism of Richards, Wilson, Blackmur, Burke, Trilling, Leavis, Frye, Auerbach, the <br />New Critics, or even an Americanist like Matthiessen, borrow, revise, draw upon, or subvert modernist “literary” techniques? Conversely, how did the criticism of that period shape the direction of contemporary “literature” as well as art that would come later? Finally, how can the study of critics, scholars, academics, and literary journalists from the modernist period help us think through the function of criticism or scholarship, and its relation to artistic production, in the 21st century? Simply put: how (and why) should we continue to read and engage the critics of this period? <br /> <br />This panel invites papers discussing any aspect of criticism or critical culture from the modernist period. Papers that seek to challenge the “confluence” of modernist literature and modernist criticism and argue for the centrality of its “division” are also welcome. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to dan.nutters@gmail.com by April 23rd. <br /> <br />*This CFP is for a proposed panel for the Modernist Studies Association Conference to be held in Pittsburgh on November 6-9.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, US
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Dan Nutters

Back to Top





Disability and Modern Lyric


Disability and Modern Lyric <br /> <br />Raphael Allison, Assistant Professor of Literature (MAT Program), Bard College <br />allison@bard.edu <br /> <br />MSA 16 <br />Pittsburgh, 6–9 November 2016 <br /> <br />While the literature of disability has recently become the focus of intense scholarly scrutiny in the interdisciplinary field of disability studies, links between disability and modern lyric have yet to be fully explored. This panel seeks to engage the larger question of how disability is represented—both mimetically and in terms of lyric form—in poetry of the 20th century to the present. Preference will be given to work linking disability to innovations in form and modernist experimentation. How does disability relate to the line, stanza, figuration, and the page itself? How do poets deploy disability not just in representation but also in composition and performance? How does disability complicate poetic genres? In what ways is poetry useful in abetting a “social model” of disability? In resisting naturalizations of the disabled body? What role has poetry played in the disability rights movement, and in forging the rise of disability studies? <br /> <br />Please submit a 300-word abstract to Raphael Allison at allison@bard.edu by April 20, 2014.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Raphael Allison

Back to Top





CFP: Modernist Women after The Career of that Struggle: New Scholarship on H.D. and Her Circle


The H.D. International Society invites paper abstracts for a proposed panel for the Modernist Studies Association conference (Pittsburgh, Nov. 6-9, 2014), "Modernist Women after The Career of that Struggle: New Scholarship on H.D. and Her Circle." €In recognition of Rachel Blau DuPlessis’s position as keynote speaker for the 2014 conference, the H.D. International Society calls for contributions to a panel considering the legacy of her early criticism, H.D.: The Career of that Struggle(1986), and proposing new directions in modernist studies of H.D. and her circle. We are working with Rachel Blau DuPlessis about the possibility of having her respond to the papers in this panel. <br /> <br />In her preface, DuPlessis maps women writers on a matrix of authority, including cultural authority, the authority of otherness/marginality, gender authority, and authorities of sexuality/eroticism, noting that achieving these forms of authority necessarily involves struggle. In the nearly three decades since DuPlessis made her argument, H.D. has gained significantly in the struggle for canonical status, and her writing and that of others in her circle has gained centrality, if not authority, within modernist studies. As we reflect both backward and forward on this body of scholarly work, how should scholars today define the career and the struggle of H.D. and/or other modernist women in her circle? <br /> <br />Submit brief bios and 250-word abstracts by April 20 to ckusch@uscupstate.edu and rawalsh@ncsu.edu.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, US
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Rebecca Walsh

Back to Top





Extended—Modernist Immediacy After Media Studies


Seeking additional contributions to the proposed panel: Modernist Immediacy After Media Studies MSA 16 <br /> <br />In his landmark study, A Genealogy of Modernism (1984), Michael Levenson traced the intellectual and literary travails of a "logic of immediacy" at the heart of literary modernism. Revisiting Levenson's thesis in the wake of the revolutions in media studies and in the study of media in/of modernism, traced in such significant recent works of scholarship as Mark Goble's Beautiful Circuits, Mark Seltzer's True Crime, and Mark Wollaeger's Modernism, Media, and Propaganda, this panel asks the following questions: how can we best reframe and reexamine the modernist desire for immediacy that Levenson diagnosed thirty years ago? Knowing what we know now about the modernists' close intellectual and imaginative engagement with contemporary modes of mediation and the dreams behind them, how should we change our understanding of immediacy in modernity, both aesthetic and everyday? <br /> <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a CV to ampri@uchicago.edu by Apr. 20th <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2014

For more information, contact: Aleks Prigozhin

Back to Top





Networks of Modernism (MSA 16)


Networks of Modernism <br />In his essay “What is a City?” (1937) Lewis Mumford describes the metropolis as “a related collection of primary groups and purposive associations” (93). His account of the city parallels twentieth-century conceptions of modernity as a vast grid of interconnected individuals. As the nineteenth century transitioned to the twentieth, populations increasingly congregated in massive metropolitan hubs that organized disparate individuals into a loosely constructed unity. For many, the city began to exemplify this vision of individual collectivity, all lines joining to a hub. Drawing on such a conception of urban life, Mabel Dodge described her perception of the new possibilities for collaboration in the twentieth century: “Looking back on it now, it seems as though everywhere, in that year of 1913, barriers went down and people reached other who had never been in touch before; there were all sorts of new ways to communicate, as well as new communications (39). <br />Attending to these connections provides a different avenue for approaching modernism. In the 2012 special issue of Modernism/Modernity “Mediamorphoses: Print Culture and Transatlantic/Transnational Public Sphere(s),” Ann Ardis outlines the approaches to modernism that many contemporary critics are taking: “The contributors to this special issue deepen our knowledge of transatlantic and transnational interactions and networks among writers, publishers, editors, artists, typographers, and craftsmen engaged in the production of print artifacts” (v-vi). In keeping with the conference theme of “Confluence and Division,” this panel seeks papers that address the collaborations and connections that characterized the networks of modernism. We will also consider how the network metaphor can open up productive new ways to approach modernism critically. Papers should approach modernism from the standpoint of multiplicity rather than focus on single authors, books, visual artists, or periodicals. Special attention will be given to papers that also address transnational connections. Please send an abstract (250 words) with a short CV to Matthew N. Hannah at mhannah@uoregon.edu. <br /> <br />Topics might include: <br /> <br />Periodical Studies <br />Salon Culture <br />Digital Humanities <br />Cultural Studies <br />History of the Book <br />Transnational Modernisms

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2014

For more information, contact: Matthew Hannah

Back to Top





Conceptual Writing and Modernist Avant-Gardes


Analyses of the relationship between modernism and contemporary literature abound (see Majorie Perloff, Rebecca Walkowitz, David James, and Jessica Pressman) with well-known writers like Ben Marcus, Will Self, and Tom McCarthy affiliating with the experiments of Joyce, Stein, and Gaddis, among others. Conceptual writers and artists, in particular, have been quick to construct a genealogy of experimentation rooted in modernist avant-gardism, leading from Gertrude Stein to Kenneth Goldsmith, by way of Marcel Duchamp, Samuel Beckett, Guy Debord, and John Cage. What aesthetic confluences or divisions arise when considering the practices of conceptual writing alongside the practices of the modernist avant-garde? <br /> <br />This panel will examine the confluences and divergences between conceptual writing and modernist avant-garde projects. Papers might consider the following questions: <br /> <br />What has the figure of modernism come to mean for conceptual writers and artists? How is modernism being recognized, revised, or reimagined? What is lost, or, repressed in conceptual writing’s modernist genealogies? How do the strategies of conceptual writing revive or rewrite oft-told stories of modernist aesthetics, such as flatness, presentness, self-reflexivity, autonomy, or “thingness”? To what extent does conceptual writing’s interest in new media forms recall or reinvent the old media environments shaping modernist forms? <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary and theoretical papers are especially welcome. Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief biography by April 15 to Laura B. McGrath at mcgrat85@msu.edu.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2014

For more information, contact: Laura B. McGrath

Back to Top





Modernist Studies and the &quot;Angloworld&quot;: Confluence or Division?


Modernist Studies and the "Angloworld": Confluence or Division? <br />(MSA 16, Pittsburgh, PA, November 6-9, 2014) <br /> <br />Historical debate about the "British world"€ has recently been galvanized by James Belich'€™s ambitious "Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld, 1783-1939" (2009). For Belich, the "Angloworld" is the decentralized but interconnected unit formed by Great Britain; its settler colonies in Canada, South Africa, and Australasia; and the United States. He argues that US and British expansion in the long nineteenth century share a common history as parts of a general "Anglo divergence,"€ a massive surge in Anglophone settlement that far surpassed that of other Europeans. <br /> <br />As they respond to Belich's recasting of the "€œBritish world,"€ historians have thrown down a gauntlet to literary critics. Reviewing Belich's book, Dror Wahrman asks, "What enabled the reproduction of metropoles across this Anglo world, what tied its many parts together, and what unified it...?"€ The answer, he says, must come from cultural historians and literary critics: "€œIf they cannot produce the remains of the veins and sinews of this global...multi-headed English-speaking hydra, then it probably never lived."€ <br /> <br />This panel proposes to take up this challenge. In what ways and to what extent can the "€œveins and sinews"€ of the (or an) Angloworld be found in modernist-era literature and culture? What common literary patterns can be discerned across this world, and do these patterns substantiate the proposition that a common "Anglo" culture or colonial logic existed? Do material similarities between American and British settlement territories, or between American and British metropolitan cores, give rise to similar formal characteristics or ways of imagining identity in literary works from these regions? How does the Angloworld intersect with, diverge from, or contest other models for thinking about modernist literature outside the nation - €”transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, empire, the Hispanic or Francophone worlds, the Atlantic world (white or black), or the global? In short, how might modernist and twentieth-century scholars deploy or resist the "Angloworld" as a category for literary analysis? <br /> <br />Potential paper topics include (but are not limited to): <br /> <br />-Modernist theorizations of the Anglo-American relationship and Anglo-American history <br />-Anglo-American emigre modernists - ”Eliot, Pound, Kipling, Auden, H.D. - in "€œAngloworld" perspective <br />-The construction and representation of gender in British and American settler societies <br />-Colonial nationalism and American regionalism <br />-Literary depictions of Angloworld settlement <br />-Modernisms in the British dominions and the American West <br />-The "voyage in" to British and American metropoles <br />-Indigenous peoples in American and British settlement territories <br />-The positions and experiences of non-"Anglo" populations in the Angloworld <br />-The relationship between settlement and other forms of imperialism or expansion <br />-The Angloworld and the new modernist studies <br />-The reception of American "€œWild West" culture in the British world <br />-The Angloworld and the world wars <br />-The economic mechanisms of colonization, re-colonization, and decolonization throughout the Angloworld, and their literary imprints <br /> <br />Interested persons should submit a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Maxwell Uphaus (mbu2102@columbia.edu) by April 11, 2014. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 11, 2014

For more information, contact: Maxwell Uphaus

Back to Top





Modernity, Contingency, Community


The Confluence and Division website poses the question “How can modernist practices, aesthetics, and formations be situated within or in relation to modernity’s energies, imagined as layers, structures, and figures of confluence and division?” We suggest that modernist representations of contingency afford unique ways of situating these energies in a variety of aesthetic, political, and philosophical contexts. Our panel proposes to examine texts, artifacts, and modernist contexts in which communities are constructed in relation to, and make productive use of, a phenomenon that has been identified as one of the key characteristics of modernity: that of contingency. <br /> <br />How, we ask, can an ethic of contingency contribute to the political, artistic, or social efficacy of communal projects? Can a strategic deployment of contingency-based ethics lead to a rapprochement between aesthetics and politics? What aesthetic forms might such a rapprochement take, and will we have to rethink central notions such as aesthetic unity? Do we have to rethink the concept of community itself in the light of modern contingency? Might an awareness of contingency enable the creation of new communities, and what type of legacies do such communities leave behind them? How might the idea of contingency inflect the question of what it means to do “modernist studies,” interdisciplinary or otherwise? <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of 250 words or less with a short bio to stephjaybrown@gmail.com by 1 April 2014. <br /> <br />Panel Chair: Thomas Claviez, University of Bern <br />Panel Organizer: Steph Brown, University of Arizona

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, US
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2014

For more information, contact: Steph Brown

Back to Top





Modernist Immediacy After Media Studies


In his landmark study, A Genealogy of Modernism (1984), Michael Levenson traced the intellectual and literary travails of a "logic of immediacy" at the heart of literary modernism. Revisiting Levenson’s thesis in the wake of the revolutions in media studies and in the study of media in/of modernism, traced in such significant recent works of scholarship as Mark Goble’s Beautiful Circuits, Mark Seltzer’s True Crime, and Mark Wollaeger’s Modernism, Media, and Propaganda, this panel asks the following questions: how can we best reframe and reexamine the modernist desire for immediacy that Levenson diagnosed thirty years ago? Knowing what we know now about the modernists’ close intellectual and imaginative engagement with contemporary modes of mediation and the dreams behind them, how should we change our understanding of immediacy in modernity, both aesthetic and everyday? <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a CV to ampri@uchicago.edu by Apr. 10

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2014

For more information, contact: Aleks Prigozhin

Back to Top





Modernist Masculinities


We are seeking one additional paper for a proposed panel on “Modernist Masculinities.” What models of a “New Man” (or New Men) did modernism propose to complement or counter the New Woman? How were new forms of masculinity figured in conjunction with race, sexuality, age, nationality, class, colonial status? What relationships were posited between masculinity and modernist formal innovation? Papers treating some aspect of trans-oceanic flow/exchange in relation to masculinity will be especially welcome but all approaches will be considered; note that all papers will be twelve minutes long. Please send 100-word abstract and proposed title to carlston@email.unc.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 04, 2014

For more information, contact: Erin G. Carlston

Back to Top





Nationalism &amp; Identity


This CFP IS for MSA 16 in Pittsburgh <br /> <br />While the dissolution of empire marked the first half Europe's twentieth-century political landscape, its former colonies and territories are still struggling with the legacies of their occupation: economic trade and infrastructure, education, religious institutions, political regimes, and national identity. Arab Spring is a direct manifestation of the conflict of western models of governance with local, non-European cultures and communities. <br /> <br />Exploring MSA 16'€™s theme of Confluence and Division, this panel will consider the following questions: How are the recent upheavals of government, social orders, and economies in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and India the legacy of European modernism? How did colonial powers€™ privileging of western values, i.e., race, religion, education, and political persuasion, shape post-war and inter-war structures in former colonial territories? Where do these western structures/values muddy the waters of ongoing protests and civil wars? How has Europe'€™s measured support of particular, pro-western regimes hindered the organic development of these nation states? To what extent are these nation states economically tied to their former administrators? How has early twentieth-century Europe'€™s understanding and categorization of classes, castes, ethnicities, and religions shaped the politics of those countries in the twenty-first century? This session invites paper proposals that address the topics and questions above from all disciplines, and welcomes other approaches to nationalism and identity in relation to modernity, the Great War, and the twentieth-century nation state. <br /> <br /> <br />Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA <br />Conference Starts: November 06, 2014 <br />Conference Ends: November 09, 2014 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014 <br /> <br />For more information, contact Heather.Lusty@unlv.edu <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

Back to Top





Risk Modernism


Modernist Studies Association Annual Conference, "Confluence and Division" <br />Nov. 6-9, 2014, Pittsburgh, PA <br /> <br />What is the modernism of risk? During the first half of the twentieth century an already massive apparatus of risk analysis and administration expanded dramatically, and new modes of risk consciousness came into being. Especially in the financial sector, new kinds of securities, new levels of speculation, new markets for insurance, and new complexities of the global financial system made the condition of being at-risk normative--even desirable--for many people living in western liberal societies. <br /> <br />This panel will examine what it means to think about modernism as a creative and critical engagement with emergent cultures of risk, especially in relation to economics and finance. How does modernism rethink risk for an age of abstract and high-speed global finance? How does literature propagate, resist, or encode risk dynamics and the ideologies behind them? What kinds of risk did Modernism absorb from the colonial situation, or from earlier historical precedents? And how did risk pressure or even reshape existing conceptions of race, class, gender, or sexuality? <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary and theoretical papers that address some aspect of finance or economics are especially welcome, as are papers from various national or transnational perspectives. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of about 300 words to Jason Puskar at puskar@uwm.edu by April 1, 2014. <br /> <br /> <br />Contexts might include: <br />- Speculation <br />- Gambling practices <br />- Gender and risk taking <br />- Risk theory <br />- Insurance cultures <br />- Risk and race <br />- Politics of risk <br />- The welfare state <br />- Colonial trade and administration <br />- Economic forecasting <br />- Risk expertise and informatics <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, US
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Jason Puskar

Back to Top





New Approaches to the First World War: Bodies, Landscapes, Monuments


CFP for MSA Conference in Pittsburgh, Nov. 2014 <br /> <br />New Approaches to the First World War: Bodies, Landscapes, Monuments <br /> <br />This panel will consider new approaches to literary and cultural representations of the First World War with particular emphasis on bodily integrity, injury and physical sensation; the relation of bodies to landscapes; the destruction of ecosystems; underground habitation; unburied corpses; civilian bodies; and WWI hospitals, cemeteries and monuments. Various approaches are welcome: disability studies, queer theory, eco-criticism, trauma studies, history of medicine, space studies, race studies, etc. Priority will be given to interdisciplinary proposals that include attention to film, photography, architecture, painting, sculpture or other media either on their own or in conjunction with historical, literary and medical texts. Also welcome are proposals that address the war beyond the western front, issues of race and colonialism in the war context, and materials by women writers and artists. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a one-paragraph bio to Stacy Hubbard at sch1@buffalo.edu by April 1st. <br />

Conference Location: Pittburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Stacy Hubbard

Back to Top





DH/HR: Digital Humanities and the Harlem Renaissance


Submissions invited for a roundtable on DH/HR: Digital Humanities and the Harlem Renaissance at MSA16 in Pittsburgh, PA, Nov. 6-9, 2014. How can digital tools and platforms transform our understanding of the Harlem Renaissance and its relation to modernism? How might digital archives and resources resist or reinforce century's old practices of segregation, discrimination, and exclusion in literary histories? Short presentations might focus on new digital projects, pedagogical approaches, and scholarly analyses, or some combination thereof.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Suzanne Churchill

Back to Top





Movement, Transmission, Intercorporeality (MSA 16)


This panel will consider how perceived boundaries between bodies, both somatic and subjective, become blurred through movement-oriented formal/textual/performance practices. The idea of movement as communicable and connective also offers a way of thinking through points of contact and flow among literary genres, performances, and cultural texts. Papers might consider early-twentieth century instances or representations of kinesthetic empathy, intercorporeality, unique but shared phenomenological and haptic experiences, and muscle memory in disciplinary and/or artistic training methods. Interdisciplinary approaches are particularly welcome, and might draw from fields such as dance and/or performance studies, queer theory, film studies, psychoanalysis, history of science, urban planning, and art history, among others. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a one-paragraph bio to hjankows@indiana.edu by April 1st. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Harmony Jankowski

Back to Top





Contemporary Modernisms: Editing Emerging Modernist Texts


Contemporary Modernisms: Editing Emerging Modernist Texts <br />MSA 16, November 6-9, 2014. Pittsburgh, PA. / Confluence and Division. <br /> <br />As scholars encounter previously unpublished archival texts written by modernist authors, what are the considerations for preparing an audience and contextualizing new materials both within the author’s oeuvre and with regard to the wider literary landscape? How do we approach the classification of such texts, which may have been withheld from the author’s public by the author or other literary caretakers for a variety of reasons – disability, politics, or aesthetics, to name a few possibilities? This panel will investigate how these outlier texts speak to us now, and how the emergence of new modernist texts alters our understanding of the tendencies and networks of the literary movement. <br /> <br />Please send a c.v., title, and abstract of 200-300 words to Caroline Maun at caroline.maun@wayne.edu by April 1, 2014. <br />

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, US
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Caroline Maun

Back to Top





What is Black Modernism?


This panel seeks to interrogate assumptions about the meaning of Black Modernism. We invite papers that explore ways in which modernist authors negotiate the relationship between historically situated blackness and aesthetic expression. Does "Black Modernism" refer to the work of authors who self-identified as black? Does it refer to modernism as a movement that mattered (and matters) to black readers? Is the creation of a thing called "Black Modernism" a matter of anthologizing, editing, and publishing practices? When paired together, how do the terms "black" and "modernism" mutually inform one another? Does "Black Modernism" imply the existence of "White modernism"? Papers that take up these questions or others on the intersection of black cultural expression and modernism are welcome. <br /> <br />Papers might address: <br /> <br />- How critical race theory inflects our readings of modernism <br />- Texts that write against received definitions of blackness, whiteness, and other racial formations <br />- Black internationalism and other transnational networks of race <br />- Intersections of race with class, gender, and nationality <br />- Visual culture (photography, film, and beyond) and Black Modernism <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300 words to Aubrey Porterfield at aubrey.k.porterfield@vanderbilt.edu by March 30, 2014.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Aubrey Porterfield

Back to Top





Misappropriation: Rethinking Narratives of Modernist Appropriation


We invite papers that broaden our understanding of modernist appropriation by considering it alongside concepts such as influence, collage, ekphrasis, translation, republication, or the objet trouvé. Understood as the deliberate borrowing of form or content from another author, culture, language, or perceived racial group, appropriation is often seen as an imperialist practice. For example, Pound's use of Chinese characters and Picasso's reworking of African masks have been read as Eurocentric acts of acquisition. Yet, if appropriation is both confluence and division--its bringing together necessarily hierarchizing--we wonder how this inherent instability might undermine its hegemonic implications, creating space for resistance, play, and critique. As these very features become the dominant in the postmodern Appropriation Art of the nineteen-seventies, we'€™re interested in how they might have functioned during the nineteen-teens, twenties, and thirties. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300 words to Elizabeth Barnett at elizabeth.s.barnett@vanderbilt.edu or Aubrey Porterfield at aubrey.k.porterfield@vanderbilt.edu by March 30, 2014.

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2014

For more information, contact: Elizabeth Barnett

Back to Top





1930s Women: Modernists or Iconoclasts?


In 1928, Eleanor Roosevelt pointed out that women might have received the right to vote, but in the early 1930s, this remained “a gesture without real power.” This panel will ask how this political gain but continued social opposition to women’s equality affected the reception and interpretation of writing published by women in the 1930s, many of whom have remained on the periphery of mainstream modernist scholarship. Positioned at the intersection of period, political, and aesthetic crosscurrents, and though consistently present at conferences and in anthologies – thanks in large part to the revisionary agenda of feminist scholars – women writers of the 1930s have yet to be treated as a formidable characters in the story scholars tell about modernism. Thus, the panel we are proposing, “1930s Women: Modernists or Iconoclasts,” will investigate the current position of more established women writers in modernist studies as a consistent yet still peripheral presence in collections, in conferences, and in the classroom. This panel will demonstrate that writers who do not fit neatly into the stories scholars tell about modernism actually have much to show us about the politics of modernism’s scholarly history. <br /> <br />We are particularly seeking transatlantic approaches, including those that engage issues of racial and sexual identity. <br /> <br />Please email a 250 word abstract and short bio by March 28th to: lauren.rosenblum@gmail.com or ericadelsandro@gmail.com

Conference Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Conference Starts: November 06, 2014
Conference Ends: November 09, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: March 28, 2014

For more information, contact: Lauren M. Rosenblum

Back to Top





MLA 2015: Narrating Madness and Autism


This non-guaranteed special session invites papers addressing how narratives of psychosis, mood disorders, or autism (in any medium, genre, or period) change our understanding of the ethics and phenomenology of reading, viewing, or listening. I welcome disability studies critiques of concepts of madness or autism, histories of medical or psychological narratives, and philosophy of psychology and psychiatry analyses of cognition, affect, volition, or hermeneutics in narratives of madness or autism conceptualized as real experiences of distress, impairment, and different mental structures. Please submit inquiries, 350-word abstracts and CVs to Jonathan Gagas, Temple University (jongagas@temple.edu) by March 15, 2014. Panelists must be current members of MLA.

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: January 08, 2015
Conference Ends: January 11, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2014

For more information, contact: Jonathan Gagas

Back to Top





MLA 2015: Labyrinthine Modernisms in Pirandellian Times


The Modernist Studies Association and the Pirandello Society of America invite you to submit paper abstracts for a proposed joint panel at the MLA Convention in Vancouver (January 2015). <br /> <br />We seek papers/presentations that consider the use of labyrinths and puzzling structures/forms in modernist production, focusing both on Pirandello and on his contemporaries in Europe and across the globe. <br /> <br />Some potential questions of interest include (but are not limited to): whether specific modernist writers develop labyrinthine structures to achieve different outcomes (from aporia and confusion to social-political subversion, etc.); how the labyrinth functions within the text (is it disruptive or a source of continuity? Does it involve the reader, the author, the characters, a meta-fictional self-reflection, etc.?); what are the methods by which such puzzling forms are constructed and deployed; how do various types of modernist labyrinths compare with one another within and across boundaries (of geography, language, time, etc.)? <br /> <br />We welcome comparative and interdisciplinary approaches. <br /> <br />Please submit 250-word abstracts by 10 March 2014 to Leonard Diepeveen (Leonard.Diepeveen@Dal.Ca) and Michael Subialka (michael.subialka@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk).

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: January 08, 2015
Conference Ends: January 11, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2014

For more information, contact: Len Diepeveen

Back to Top





MLA 15: Proposals on Lawrence's The Rainbow and War


In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the publication of The Rainbow, the D. H. Lawrence Society of North America invites abstracts for their session at the 2015 MLA on new readings of The Rainbow, including how it encodes war, wartime propaganda, surveillance, trauma theory, border-crossings, changes in sex or gender identity, or models of citizenship, race, or British national identity. Please submit 250 word abstracts (in PDF or Word) to Dr. Nancy L. Paxton(nancy.paxton@nau.edu) by March 1, 2014. Panelists must be current members of MLA. For more information, visit: http://dhlsna.com <br />

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: January 08, 2015
Conference Ends: January 11, 2015

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Nancy L. Paxton

Back to Top





Comic Returns: A Symposium on Satire and Parody in Modern Britain


Call for Papers <br />“Comic Returns: A Symposium on Satire and Parody in Modern Britain” <br />British Modernities Group, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign April 25-26, 2013 <br /> <br />Keynote Speaker: Aaron Matz, Department of English, Scripps College <br /> <br />The British Modernities Group invites graduate students to present papers and posters at its ninth annual conference, “Comic Returns: A Symposium on Satire and Parody in Modern Britain.” This conference invites papers from faculty and graduate students working on satire from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, including English, Cinema and Media Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Art History. We seek innovative research that studies satire and parody across media and/or research that explores the role that satire, parody, and adaptation play in modern and contemporary British literature (1800–present). <br /> <br />As a phenomenon, humor remains understudied in academic circles. Despite the fact that we encounter satire, parody, and other modes of comic adaptation daily, scholars struggle to find a language that is appropriate to describe these encounters. As translations and disfigurations, satire and parody often move across media boundaries. “Comic Returns” will provide a platform for scholars to develop a critical language to describe both our encounters with mixed media adaptations and the disfigurations within them. By bringing together graduate students and faculty from various academic backgrounds, “Comic Returns” will seek to create an interdisciplinary space for talking about humor and adaptation. <br /> <br />We invite papers that consider the following perspectives on satire and parody, among others: <br />Visual caricature <br />Pantomime <br />Adaptation theory Comic affect <br />Parodic/satirical performance Satirical realism <br />The satirical novel <br />Literary Plagiarisms and Originality Appropriation <br />Pastiche and other forms of stylistic impersonation Defacement and Disfiguration <br /> <br /> <br />Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be submitted to modernities@gmail.com by February 24, 2014. Please include your name, along with your departmental and institutional affiliations. Accepted papers and posters will be notified by February 28. 2014. Visit our website, http://modernities.wordpress.com/, for more information about the BMG. <br />

Conference Location: Champaign-Urbana, IL, USA
Conference Starts: April 25, 2014
Conference Ends: April 26, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: February 24, 2014

For more information, contact: Esther Dettmar & John Moore

Back to Top





Thinking with John Berger


Thinking with John Berger <br />A 2-day conference at Cardiff Metropolitan University <br />Cardiff, Wales, UK <br />4-5 September 2014 <br /> <br />Keynote speakers: <br />Professor Bruce Robbins (Columbia University) <br />Professor Peter de Bolla (University of Cambridge) <br /> <br />Call for papers <br /> <br />John Berger presents a uniquely diverse model of critical artistic and intellectual work. He is, variously, artist (and a philosopher of drawing); art critic/theorist; ‘art geographer’ (Edward Soja); novelist (although preferring to call himself a storyteller); poet and dramatist; film-maker; photographic collaborator; theorist of migration; political activist in the domains of anti-capitalism and human rights. <br />This conference <br />This conference at Cardiff Metropolitan University places a focus on the transformative potential of Berger’s work for educational practice. Berger may be said to have kept a distance from the institutional lecture hall, seminar room or studio; yet his work, through an interdisciplinarity seemingly without boundaries, continues to impact upon a number of academic fields. In dedicating himself to‘the job of thinker and artist’ (Sally Potter), Berger seems also consistently to have orientated himself towards the future and to practice: he is, in the words of Sukhdev Sandhu, ‘in the best sense, a teacherly writer and performer’ -- a teacherly method characterised, that is, by the principles of collaboration and equality. <br />The conference therefore takes an exploratory approach to the question of how we might, as educators, use, discuss, learn from and continue to develop Berger’s thought. In what ways might that thought help to transform curricula, pedagogy, and our work as writers, artists and teachers? How pertinent is it, for example, to the growing internationalisation of the academy and to questions of global educational citizenship? Or how relevant as a critical resource within the context of a new, corporate and marketised environment in education? Might Berger’s ‘radical humanism’ (Tilda Swinton) help to carve out alternative futures? <br />The conference will be held at the University’s Llandaff campus, close to historic Llandaff village and cathedral, and a 30-minute walk through parkland to Cardiff city centre. It is organised by Cardiff School of Education, with the collaboration of Cardiff School of Art and Design, and will coincide with the opening of a new centre for CSAD at the Llandaff campus. <br /> <br />Call for Papers <br />Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited. The conference is open to contributors from all subject areas and disciplines, though it is anticipated that it will be of principal appeal to those interested in Berger’s impact upon the following fields: literary studies; visual arts; art history; philosophy; creative writing; film production and education; performance; drawing; photography; cultural geography; critical and cultural theory. Topics for papers will be organised into panels, which might include or resemble, but are definitely not restricted to, the following: <br />• Criticism beyond a hermeneutics of suspicion <br />• Storytelling and fiction in the C21 <br />• Aesthetics and materialism <br />• Intellectual work today <br />• ‘Planetarity’, global citizenship, cosmopolitics <br />• Pedagogy in art history <br />• Developments in photography and education <br />• Combinations of theory and practice in writing <br />• Consequences and cultures of the ‘new poverty’ (John Berger) <br />• Spatial theory and ‘art geography’ <br />• Radical cinema <br />• Spinoza and a new vitalism <br />• Drawing and writing <br /> <br />Proposals should be no more than 300 words in length, and should be sent to the conference email address: bergerconference@cardiffmet.ac.uk <br />Deadline for proposals: 1 February 2014 <br />Queries and correspondence regarding the conference should be addressed to Professor Jeff Wallace at jwallace@cardiffmet.ac.uk, or call 00 44(0)29 2041 7102. <br />A conference website, with information regarding fees, accommodation and logistics, will be up and running soon. In the meantime, queries on these issues should be addressed to Katerina Ray, Huw Jones or Donna O’Flaherty, conference administrators, at bergerconference@cardiffmet.ac.uk (tel 00 44 (0)29 2020 5754 or 00 44 (0) 29 2041 7078/6577) <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Cardiff, Wales, UK
Conference Starts: September 04, 2014
Conference Ends: September 05, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: February 01, 2014

For more information, contact: Jeff Wallace

Back to Top





TSE @ ALA


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2014 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 22-25, at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Please send proposals (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 15, 2014.

Conference Location: Washington, DC, USA
Conference Starts: May 22, 2014
Conference Ends: May 25, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2014

For more information, contact: Nancy K. Gish

Back to Top



Back to Main Index