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Modernist Communities - Inaugural Conference of the French Society of Modernist Studies


MODERNIST COMMUNITIES <br /> <br />The inaugural international conference of the <br />French Society of Modernist Studies <br /> <br />25-26 April 2014 <br />University of the Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 <br />Paris, France <br /> <br />Keynote speakers: <br />Jessica Berman (University of Maryland) <br />Linnell Secomb (University of Greenwich) <br /> <br /> <br />Call for papers <br /> <br />The aim of this two-day conference is to foster discussion on communities in the modernist period. As discursive constructs and historical practices, communities constitute a privileged phenomenon from which to understand the political and ethical regime of modernist texts, as well as the actual forms of collective experience in which writers and readers were involved. More than a decade after Jessica Berman’s landmark work on "the politics of community" in modernist fiction, we seek to explore the various ways in which communities were configured across genres and artistic media, but also to acknowledge the grounds of their historical and cultural specificity. We hope that this will lead us to distinguish various versions of the communal, from the ideal to the empirical, from the utopian to the everyday, from consensus to dissensus. <br /> <br />Communities can be recorded at a symbolic as well as a material level, both inside and outside modernist texts themselves. We therefore encourage a variety of critical approaches, ranging from historicist and sociological, to aesthetic and philosophical. Through this critical diversity, we are particularly interested in investigating the historicity of modernist communities: how can we identify the historical singularity of modernist communal forms? How can we account for the changing scales, spaces and media of communal thinking in the modernist period? This emphasis on a historical being-in-common—what Jean-Luc Nancy defined as the community of the contemporary—can fruitfully be coupled with a critical reading of various later theories of community, from Benedict Anderson’s "imagined communities" to Jacques Rancière’s aesthetic conception of "the common". To what extent do modernist texts lead us to understand or challenge such theories? By taking a far-ranging approach to the concepts, forms, and historical practices of community, we hope to map out the plurality of this phenomenon, while recording its persisting elusiveness. <br /> <br />As the conference will inaugurate the creation of the French Society of Modernist Studies—Société d’Etudes Modernistes—, we seek to bring together scholars from all countries and hope to strengthen collaborations between French and international researchers. <br /> <br />Possible paper topics may include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />- Communities across genres and literary forms <br />- Communities across artistic forms (painting, music, etc.) <br />- Writing, reading, and printing communities <br />- Academic communities and the institutional construction of modernisms <br />- Cultural communities and the ‘battle of the brows’ <br />- Everyday communities: communal practices, communal occasions, communal emotions <br />- Utopian communities <br />- The places and spaces of community <br />- The temporalities of community <br />- National and transnational communities <br />- Technological and ecological communities <br />- Modernism and the discourses on community: international relations, sociology, anthropology, history, philosophy, psychology, sciences, etc. <br />- Modernism and later theories of community (Benedict Anderson, Jean-Luc Nancy, Giorgio Agamben, Jacques Rancière, etc.) <br /> <br />Organisers: Vincent Bucher (University of Grenoble 3) and Caroline Pollentier (University of Paris 3) <br />EA 4398 – PRISMES (VORTEX) <br /> <br />Scientific Committee: Isabelle Alfandary (University of Paris 3), Jessica Berman (University of Maryland), Catherine Bernard (University of Paris 7), Vincent Bucher (University of Grenoble 3), Antoine Cazé (University of Paris 7), Claire Davison-Pégon (University of Paris 3), Catherine Lanone (University of Paris 3), Laura Marcus (University of Oxford), Axel Nesme (University of Lyon 2), Caroline Pollentier (University of Paris 3), Linnell Secomb (University of Greenwich). <br /> <br />Papers will be delivered in English. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short bio-bibliography to both organisers by 31 October 2013. <br />buchervincent@gmail.com <br />caroline.pollentier@hotmail.fr <br />

Conference Location: Paris, France
Conference Starts: April 25, 2014
Conference Ends: April 26, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: October 31, 2013

For more information, contact: Caroline Pollentier

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Beyond the Victorian and Modernist Divide


International Conference <br /> March, 27-28 2014 <br />University of Rouen <br />ERIAC (http://eriac.net/) <br />Anne Besnault-Levita, Anne-Florence Gillard Estrada <br /> <br />Call for papers <br />Beyond the Victorian and Modernist Divide <br /> <br /> Ezra Pound’s injunction to “make it new!” or Virginia Woolf’s “on or about 1910” statement have long been used in order no support a version of modernism as a strictly aesthetic revolution — or crisis — implying an essential break with Victorian art, culture and ideology. In the last decade, however, the crucial transition between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has been variously reassessed. In the wake of the new modernist studies and of the recent revaluations of the Victorian period, a growing body of scholarship now challenges traditional periodisation by examining the existence of overlaps and unexplored continuities between the Victorians, the post-Victorians and the modernists. Once separated by a critical and cultural break, Victorian and modernist scholars have become preoccupied with a similar search for cultural and aesthetic complexities that make it possible to move beyond doxic discourses and fixed dichotomies: the past and the present, outer life and inner life, materiality and spirituality, tradition and innovation, ideology and aesthetics. <br /> This international conference would like those scholars to join forces and contribute to this new phase in the Victorian-modern debate from a broad range of perspectives across the disciplines: literature, criticism, the visual arts, history, science and philosophy. The emergence or re-emergence of ideas such as the “modern”, the “new” or “change” at the turn of the century is an indisputable fact that we want to acknowledge and re-contextualize by examining the different meanings and practices they encompass. From there, we wish to explore the birth and perpetration of two critical meta-narratives and their interdependence: the myth of “high modernism” and the myth of “Victorianism”. If there is no clear repudiation of history and heritage on the modernists’ part, if “rupture” was a useful fiction, if the challenge to traditional aesthetics and ideology was already a Victorian preoccupation, then we definitely need to remap modernism and Victorianism simultaneously. <br /> The papers that we call for are meant to contribute to a trans-disciplinary publication whose synopsis could be the following, although it is far from being fixed. <br /> <br />I- Periods, words, labels: historicizing and contextualizing the idea of the “break” <br />II- Victorian, Edwardian and modernist literature: unexplored lines of filiation <br />III- Art history, aesthetic philosophy and the visual arts across the Victorian/Modernist divide <br />IV- Science, philosophy, ideology: landmarks for a new history of ideas <br />V- New approaches to identity, gender and the self: from mid-Victorians to modernist ideologies and practices. <br /> <br />Keynote speakers <br /> <br />Professor Michael Bentley, University of St. Andrews <br />Professor Melba Cuddy-Keane, University of Toronto <br /> <br />Scientific Committee <br /> <br />Pr Catherine Bernard, University Paris-Diderot — France, XXth-century literature and art <br />Dr. Anne Besnault-Levita, University of Rouen — France, British Modernism, genre and gender studies <br />Pr Michael Bentley, Université of St. Andrews — UK, XIXth-century and early XXth-entury British politics <br />Pr Myriam Boussahba-Bravard, Université Paris Diderot — Paris 7, France, XIXth-century social and political history, women’s history and gender history <br />Pr. Laurent Bury, University of Lyon 2 – France, XIXth-century literature and visual arts, President of the Société Française d’Etudes Victoriennes et Edouardiennes (S.F.E.V.E.) <br />Pr Melba Cuddy-Keane, University of Toronto Canada — modernism, narratology, globalism/internationalism, book history/print culture <br />Dr Stefano Evangelista, University of Oxford — UK, XIXth-century English literature, comparative literature, Aestheticism and Decadence, gender and visual culture <br />Pr Isabelle Gadoin, University of Poitiers — France, XIXth-century literature, art history and visual arts <br />Pr Elena Gualtieri, University of Groningen — Netherlands, modern English literature and culture, visual arts <br />Dr Anne-Florence Gillard-Estrada, University of Rouen — France, XIXth-century English literature, art criticism and visual arts, Aestheticism and Decadence <br />Pr Catherine Lanone, University of Paris 3 — France, XIXth-century literature, modernist literature <br />Pr Laura Marcus, New College, Oxford — UK, XIXth- and XXth-century literature and culture <br />Pr Christine Reynier, University of Montpellier — France, modernist literature, XXth-century literature <br />Dr Philippe Vervaecke, University of Lille 3 – France, XIXth- and XXth-century social and political history <br /> <br />The proposals (300 to 500 words with a short biographical notice) should be sent to Anne-Florence Gillard-Estrada (af.gillardestrada@orange.fr) and Anne Besnault-Levita (annelev@club-internet.fr) by September 15th 2014. Notification of acceptance: October 15th. <br /> <br />Selected Bibliography <br /> <br />Armstrong, Tim, Modernism, Technology, and the Body: A Cultural Study, Cambridge, Cambridge UP, 1998. <br />— Modernism: a Cultural History, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005. <br />Bentley Michael, “The Evolution and Dissemination of Historical knowledge,” The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain, ed. Martin Daunton, Oxford, Oxford UP, 2005, 173-198. <br />— Modernizing England’s Past: English Historiography in the Age of Modernism, 1870-1970, Cambridge, Cambridge UP, 2005. <br />Blakeney-Williams, Louise. Modernism and the Ideology of History: Literature, Politics, and the Past, Cambridge (GB), Cambridge UP, 2002. <br />Bullen, J. B. ed., Writing and Victorianism, London and New York, Longman, 1997. <br />Chapman, Raymond, The Sense of the Past in Victorian Literature, Beckenham (Kent), Croom Helm Ltd, 1986. <br />Cuddy-Keane, Melba, Anna Hammond and Alexandra Peat, Modernism: Keywords, Wiley-Blackwell (forthcoming). <br />Culler, Arthur Dwight, The Victorian Mirror of History, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 1985. <br />Feldman, Jessica R., Victorian Modernism: Pragmatism and the Varieties of Aesthetic Experience, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002. <br />Heyck, Thomas William, The Transformation of Intellectual Life in Victorian England, Beckenham (Kent), Croom Helm, 1982. <br />Huyssen, Andreas, After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism, Bloomington (Ind.), Indiana University Press, 1986. <br />Kaplan, Carol M., and Ann B. Simpson eds., Seeing Double: Revisioning Edwardian and Modernist Literature, New York, St. Martin’s press, 1996. <br />Longenbach, James, Modernist Poetics of History: Pound, Eliot and the Sense of Past, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1987. <br />Keen, Suzanne, Victorian Renovations of the Novel: Narrative Annexes and the Boundaries of Representation, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998. <br />Maxwell, Catherine, “Atmosphere and absorption: Swinburne, Eliot, Drinkwater”, in Algernon Charles Swinburne: Unofficial Laureate, eds. Catherine Maxwell and Stefano Evangelista, Manchester University Press, 2013. <br />Meisel, Perry, The Absent Father: Virginia Woolf and Walter Pater, New Haven; London, Yale University Press, 1980. <br />Parejo Vadillo, Ana, Women Poets and Urban Aestheticism: Passengers of Modernity, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. <br />Prettejohn, Elizabeth, Art for Art’s Sake: Aestheticism in Victorian Painting, Yale University Press, 2007. <br />—“From Aestheticism to Modernism, and Back Again”, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, 19, n° 2, May 2006. <br />Ross, Stephen, Modernism and Theory: A Critical Debate, London, Routledge, 2009. <br />Smith, A and J. Wallace eds., Gothic Modernisms, New York, Palgrave, 2001. <br />Zemgulys, Andrea, Modernism and the Locations of Literary Heritage, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008. <br />

Conference Location: Rouen (Normandy), France
Conference Starts: March 27, 2014
Conference Ends: March 28, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: September 15, 2013

For more information, contact: Besnault-Levita Anne

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T. S. Eliot at the Louisville Conference


The T. S. Eliot Society will again sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 20–22, 2014. Abstracts on any subject reasonably related to Eliot are invited, but those concerned with Eliot as editor, editing Eliot, or any aspect of the compositional/editorial process are particularly welcome. For further information on the 2014 conference, please visit the website: www.thelouisvilleconference.com. <br /> <br />Those interested should send a 300-word abstract to John Morgenstern (jmorgen@clemson.edu) no later than September 13, 2013. Please include your academic affiliation (if applicable), mailing address, and a brief biographical note with your abstract. <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, KY, United States
Conference Starts: February 20, 2014
Conference Ends: February 22, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: September 13, 2013

For more information, contact: John Morgenstern

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T. S. Eliot Society


THE 34th ANNUAL MEETING OF THE T. S. ELIOT SOCIETY <br /> <br />Keynote speaker: Jahan Ramazani, University of Virginia <br /> <br />1. CALL FOR PAPERS. The Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at the annual meeting in St. Louis. Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be forwarded by June 15, 2013, to the President, Michael Coyle, by email (mcoyle@colgate.edu). <br /> <br />Papers given by graduate students and scholars receiving their doctoral degrees no more than two years before the date of the meeting will be considered for the Fathman Young Scholar Award. Those eligible for this award should mention the fact in their submission. <br /> <br />For further information, please see our website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot). <br /> <br />2. CALL FOR PEER SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS. Led by Anita Patterson, this MSA-style seminar will focus on the topic of ELIOT AND ASIA. Recent debates about globalization and transnationalism in literary studies have raised interest in how the Asian "Orient" inspired modernist innovations in "Occidental" societies. This seminar invites papers that explore how transpacific intercultural dialogue figures in Eliot's poetry or may have shaped the guiding principles of his modernism. Which texts, individuals, or life experiences fostered Eliot's interest in Asia, and how did his study of these traditions, in turn, catalyze his development as a poet and critic? How does he regard the role of translation in this context? Where is there clearest evidence of Eliot's response to the literatures, religions, and arts of Asia, and how does this response compare with that of Pound, Williams, Moore, Stein, Stevens, or other authors? Does Eliot's collocation of Asian and non-Asian perspectives in his poetry mark a significant departure from hegemonic "Orientalism," in Said's sense? These questions are meant only to be suggestive, and participants are more than welcome to adopt other approaches to the general topic. <br /> <br />Anita Patterson is Professor of English at Boston University, where she teaches courses on American literature, modernism, and black literatures of the Americas. She is author, most recently, of Race, American Literature and Transnational Modernisms (Cambridge UP, 2008), and is co-editor of the book review section for Twentieth-Century Literature. She is currently working on a book about Japonisme and the emergence of American modernism, drawing on works by Eliot, Pound, Fenollosa, Okakura, La Farge, Noguchi, and others. <br /> <br />The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close July 1st. Seminarians will submit 4-5 page position papers by email, no later than September 1st. To sign up, or for answers to questions, please write Frances Dickey (dickeyf@missouri.edu) or visit our website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot). <br />

Conference Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Conference Starts: September 27, 2013
Conference Ends: September 29, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: June 15, 2013

For more information, contact: Michael Coyle

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'in:flux 1845-1945: A Century in Motion' University of Birmingham Postgraduate Conference (27.06.13) Deadline 17.05.13


in:flux <br />1845-1945: A Century in Motion <br /> <br />University of Birmingham, 27th June 2013 <br /> <br />Keynote speaker – Dr Matthew Rubery, Queen Mary University of London <br /> <br />Interdisciplinary postgraduate conference – call for papers <br /> <br />How did the rapid period of industrialisation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries help to shape societies and lifestyles in the West? What types of social changes, movements and developments characterise this time period? This interdisciplinary postgraduate conference, in affiliation with the Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity and hosted by the College of Arts and Law, seeks to explore the various ways in which this century was one of ‘motion’, in every sense of the word. The conference title seeks to encapsulate both the uncertainty and upheaval of this period as well as the physical and cultural movements that occurred at this time. We invite papers addressing these themes from postgraduate researchers and early-career academics working on this period from a variety of backgrounds. <br /> <br />Topics could include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />Cultural or social movements <br />• political movements <br />• the Women’s Movement <br />• arts movements (musical, artistic, literary) <br />• religious and philosophical <br />• popular cultural trends (food, fashion, advertising) <br /> <br />Physical movements <br />• mass movement of people (mobilisation of soldiers, migration from towns to cities) <br />• transatlantic and inter-continental travel (including emigration and immigration) <br />• leisure and tourism <br />• transport <br />• changing landscapes <br /> <br />Development and progress <br />• media (cinema, audio technology and radio, print media) <br />• scientific and medical advances <br />• technology <br />• economic growth and/or recession <br />• development of nationhood <br /> <br />These headings are suggestions only; we welcome proposals exploring crossovers between these topics, or addressing them from interdisciplinary perspectives. Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20 minute papers along with a short biographical note of no more than 50 words should be sent to pgculturalmodernity@contacts.bham.ac.uk by the 17th May 2013. We welcome any questions that you may have; please do not hesitate to contact us at the above address. <br /> <br />For more information about the Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity please visit their website: <br />http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/culturalmodernity/index.aspx <br /> <br />@pgculturalmod <br />www.facebook.com/pgculturalmod http://pgculturalmodernity.wordpress.com <br />

Conference Location: Birmingham, UK
Conference Starts: June 27, 2013
Conference Ends: June 27, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: May 17, 2013

For more information, contact: Helen Williams

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Between Art and Mass Communication: Edvard Munch and Printmaking


The aim of this conference is to investigate these important ideas in depth and to evaluate Munch’s achievement in the area of printmaking from various angles. Besides technical and object-based enquiries, we specifically seek contributions that place Munch and printmaking in broader contexts such as: <br /> <br />1. Mass media and mass distribution; <br />2. Reproduction and repetition; <br />3. Audience and reception; <br />4. Social criticism; <br />5. The art market; <br />6. The culture and practice of print workshops. <br /> <br /> <br />Proposals for this conference must include (in English) <br />a) an abstract of maximum 300 words summarizing your argument <br />b) a brief (one paragraph) academic resume, and <br />c) your full contact information. <br /> <br />Papers will be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by discussion. <br /> <br />Contributions should be sent to zhanna.saidenova@ifikk.uio.no no later than 1st May 2013. You will be notified by 1st June 2013 of your acceptance. <br /> <br />This is the third conference sponsored and organized by the “Munch and Modernity” research network at the University of Oslo, the Munch Museum, and the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo. <br /> <br />Questions: pberman@wellesley.edu <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Oslo, Norway
Conference Starts: November 21, 2013
Conference Ends: November 22, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Patricia Berman

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Sexual Futures: Versions of the Sexual Past, Visions of the Sexual Future Colloquium


Sexual Futures: Versions of the Sexual Past, Visions of the Sexual Future <br /> <br />University of Exeter, UK <br /> <br />5-6 September 2013 <br /> <br />The future offers a critical space to negotiate sexual possibilities. It can serve as a doomsday warning, provide utopian fantasies or aspirational goals for real reform. Such visions of the sexual future are often achieved through an imaginative reworking of motifs and elements from the past. This colloquium investigates how and why sexual knowledge, articulated in science, literature, art, politics, law and religion, turns to the past to envision the future. <br /> <br />When it comes to imagining the future, the past can be cast in manifold ways. It can appear as mythical, traditional, ancestral, atavistic, hereditary, primitive, classical, or historical. It can also serve a number of purposes. It can lend weight or authority; it can provide a rhetoric of objectivity, neutrality and empiricism to support visions of the future. It can galvanise calls for reform by appearing to offer visions of realistic possibility, alternative social worlds that have existed in the past and are therefore more than idle fantasy. The past can also be deployed in narratives about progress and decline, civilization and evolution, which lead towards a utopian or dystopian future. It can be marshalled as evidence to articulate universalising claims about humanity, provide evidence of variability across time, illustrate future possibilities or legitimise change. In addition, the past can offer a space of forgetting and loss and therefore a means of rejecting or engaging critically with the very concept of the future. It is the aim of the colloquium to examine how such uses of the past in the service of the future intersect with sexual knowledge and experience. <br /> <br />Forming part of the Sexual Knowledge, Sexual History project, this colloquium invites scholars from a range of disciplines to examine any aspect of the nexus between past, future and sex. Central questions might include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />- Why and how have people throughout history turned to the past to imagine sexual futures? <br />- How does the past facilitate the imagination of future sexualities? Conversely, how does the past restrict what is considered to be a possible future? <br />- Which aspects or elements of the past are used in the construction of sexual futures? <br />- What authority does the past hold in the articulation of future visions of sexuality? <br />- How is the relation between past and future conceptualised differently over time and how does this change the way in which sexuality is understood and experienced? <br />- How do uses of the past in the service of the future compare across different areas of sexual knowledge, including science, literature, art, politics, law or religion? <br /> <br />Please contact Kate Fisher (k.fisher@exeter.ac.uk), Rebecca Langlands (r.langlands@exeter.ac.uk) or Jana Funke (j.funke@exeter.ac.uk) for further details or to discuss possible research papers. <br /> <br />Abstracts to be emailed to Jana Funke by 24th April 2013.

Conference Location: Exeter, UK
Conference Starts: September 05, 2013
Conference Ends: September 06, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: April 24, 2013

For more information, contact: Jana Funke

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Teenage Kicks: The Representation of Youth Subcultures in Fiction, Film and Other Media


Teenage Kicks: The Representation of Youth Subcultures in Fiction, Film and Other Media. <br /> <br />An Interdisciplinary Conference at Keele University, Staffordshire, UK <br />18-20 July 2013 <br /> <br />CALL FOR PAPERS <br /> <br />Confirmed speakers include: <br /> <br />Professor Scott Wilson (author of Great Satan's Rage: American negativity and rap/metal in the age of supercapitalism) <br /> <br />Conference Website: www.keele-conferencemanagement.com/teen2013 <br /> <br />The legendary UK DJ John Peel has the words 'Teenage Dreams so hard to beat' carved on his gravestone, the opening line of The Undertones' classic punk song 'Teenage Kicks'. Peel's love of the music, style, attitude and outlook of youth subcultures encapsulates a general and ongoing fascination for writers, filmmakers and critics alike. From Teddy Boys to Hoodies, subcultural groups have formed the backdrop or basis for a series of imaginative works. <br /> <br />This interdisciplinary and international conference aims to bring together researchers, academics and practitioners working in the field of subcultural studies, and in particular in the representation of youth subcultures in fiction and film. <br /> <br />Much work has been done in sociology, criminology, cultural studies, cultural history and musicology to map and analyse subcultural identity and issues around youth, but comparatively little academic work has been done on the way in which youth subcultures have been represented in fiction and film. Colin MacInnes’s Absolute Beginners set the trend for the subcultural novel in the 1950s, and by way of Nik Cohn’s I am Still the Greatest Says Johnny Angelo, Richard Allen’s 1970s Skinhead novels, Jonathan Coe’s The Dwarves of Death and Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia in the 80s and 90s, to Gautum Malkani’s Londonstani and novels by John King and Alex Wheatle in the 2000s, fiction has provided a rich source of articulation and engagement with subcultural positions and lifestyles. This is in addition to the DIY fiction and fanzines that have accompanied subcultures down the years. On screen, iconic works such as The Wild Ones, Performance, A Clockwork Orange, Blitzkrieg Bop, Quadrophenia,: The Punk Rock Movie, Trainspotting, The Filth and the Fury, 8 Mile, This is England and Ill Manors have mapped both the experience of subcultural belonging and the various moral panics they have caused. <br /> <br />The conference organizers welcome proposals for 20-minute papers, and panels, from academics and researchers working in the field. Part of the aim of the conference is to generate interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary debate and interaction, so proposals are welcomed from a range of disciplines including literary studies, film studies, cultural studies, media studies, sociology, criminology, cultural history, music and musicology. <br /> <br />Although many of the novels and films cited above have UK and USA settings, we welcome papers on the representation of subcultures from all parts of the world, and are indeed interested in the way in which subcultural identity circulates internationally. From Scandinavian Death Metal to K-Pop; from La Heine to Pussy Riot, the international range of youth subcultures has provided material for the expression of emotional, ethical and political sentiment in fiction, film and other media. <br />We also aim to include a strand of creative practice into the conference, so would welcome 20-minute presentations/performances/films or displays from literary writers (fiction, poetry and drama), film makers, photographers, visual artists, musicians and other creative practitioners. <br /> <br />Abstracts should be 250-300 words in length and emailed to n.bentley@keele.ac.uk by 31st March 2013. <br /> <br />We plan to produce a collection of essays based on papers given at the conference. <br /> <br />To register for the conference please go to: www.keele-conferencemanagement.com/teen2013 <br />Registration closes: Sunday 30 June 2013. Early bird rates are available until 30 April 2013 <br /> <br /> <br />The conference organizers are Dr Nick Bentley, Dr Mark Featherstone, Dr Beth Johnson and Dr Andy Zieleniec. The conference is in association with the Keele University’s Humanities Research Institute, the Keele Cultural Research Group, and the Subcultures Network: The Interdisciplinary Network for the Study of Subcultures, Popular Music and Social Change. www.reading.ac.uk/history/research/Subcultures/Subcultures-About.aspx. <br />

Conference Location: Staffordshire, UK
Conference Starts: July 11, 2013
Conference Ends: July 13, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 31, 2013

For more information, contact: Nick Bentley

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Woolf and Wittgenstein


Modern Language Association Panel <br /> <br />Woolf, Wittgenstein, and Ordinary Language <br /> <br />This panel invites papers on Woolf’s championing of the ordinary in <br />language and Wittgenstein’s philosophy of ordinary language, both <br />thinkers’ tangential relationship to the “Apostles,” and/or their <br />influence on Bloomsbury. <br /> <br />Organizers: Madelyn Detloff detlofmm@miamioh.edu and Gaile Pohlhaus Jr. pohlhag@miamioh.edu. 300 word abstracts by March 15.

Conference Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Conference Starts: January 09, 2014
Conference Ends: January 12, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2013

For more information, contact: Madelyn Detloff

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MSA 15: Modernism and the Street


MSA 15 <br /> <br />Modernism and the Street <br /> <br /> <br />Walter Benjamin, in The Arcades Project, argued that “streets are the dwelling place of the collective. The collective is an eternally unquiet, eternally agitated being that – I the space between the building fronts – experiences, learns, understands, and invents as much as individuals do within the privacy of their own four walls.” <br /> <br />Modernism represented an epistemological shift in the consideration of street space and, moreover, could be considered as a significant aesthetic catalyst for social attitudes towards public behaviour. This panel seeks to interrogate the new representations of street spaces that emerged during modernism, and to consider their long-term consequences, both artistic and social. How did artists and writers engage with the streets? What social conditions informed their interactions, and what were the political and cultural ramifications? <br /> <br />I am particularly interested in any papers that consider modernism and the street, including concepts of interior and exterior, public and private roles, exhibition and display, and the quotidian and sensational. Papers from the fields of literature, history, art history, gender studies, and sociology are welcome; interdisciplinary papers are both welcomed and encouraged. <br /> <br />Please submit a short abstract (200-250 words) along with a 2-3 sentence scholarly biography to Alexandra Smith ( asmi1958@uni.sydney.edu.au ) by March 14. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 14, 2013

For more information, contact: Alexandra Smith

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Modernist Moods


What is the relationship between mood, being, perception and text? What effect does mood have on what we see and how we read? Do any particular moods seem to proliferate within modernist writing? How does mood manifest itself in modernist texts? <br /> <br />Proposals that deal with any of the above (or related) questions are welcomed. As are any which interact with the following paper abstract: <br /> <br />The theme of jealousy is well known to readers of In Search of Lost Time. For Proust, the intimacy of erotic desire cannot sustain itself without the driving force of jealous suspicion. The cynical, even warped, view of love that this portrays has been noted by many and the independent role of jealousy - the value of it as an epistemological tool - has been dissected by critics such as René Girard, J Hillis Miller and Malcolm Bowie. What will be suggested in this paper is something that builds on the insights of these theorists but from the altered perspective of Heideggerian philosophy. Heidegger provocatively argues that the history of Western philosophy has concerned itself with epistemology at the expense of ontology – the function of jealousy will be considered in these terms. That is to say, rather than operating as an epistemological tool, Proustian jealousy is a ‘mood’ which discloses being: it is an example of the ‘attunement’ required in the basic occurrence of Dasein. Inherently, this argument contains an assumption about the primacy of jealousy. Rather than being determined by a prior, more elemental instance of love, jealousy is an independent and autonomous emanation of original 'mood'. But jealousy also essentially distances the individual from the object of desire: so in the very instance of intimate connection with the world, the loved one is pushed away.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 14, 2013

For more information, contact: Dr Rex Ferguson

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MSA 15: Modernism and mainstream periodicals


With the completion of the Brooker and Thacker 'Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines', the breadth and depth of modern periodical studies has been radically expanded. But how might we go further? How do we define a 'modernist magazine'? What might periodicals that operated in the cultural mainstream, with a wider audience, broader content, and higher circulation, have to offer to modernist studies? Can casting a wider net aid study of the periodical marketplace? <br /> <br />This panel seeks to explore the role played by mainstream periodicals in the development of modernism. Papers are sought that investigate the relationship of modernism to individual magazines, groups of magazines, genres, or the nature of a 'mainstream periodical'. Submissions on magazines covered in the Brooker and Thacker volumes are welcome, but submissions that range beyond the magazines addressed in those volumes are particularly encouraged. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and brief CV to Charlie Dawkins (charlie.dawkins@ell.ox.ac.uk) by 13 March, 2013.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 13, 2013

For more information, contact: Charlie Dawkins

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MSA 15: Historicizing Formalism


“The basis for every art form is always conflict,” writes Viktor Shklovsky. The same might also be said for the discourse of formalism itself. Indeed, for all its emphasis on aesthetic autonomy and material specificity, the history of formalism in the modernist period is in large part the history of its contact with, and contamination by, the apparently debased and instrumental cultural forms (science, advertising, technology, mass media, etc.) from which it ostensibly sought deliverance. How did modernist aesthetics arise out of the contradictory desire to safeguard, but also distress, the separation of art and life? How does our understanding of modernist experimentation, and the discipline of literary studies that was erected to interpret it, change if we attempt to account for the conflictual genealogies of literary aesthetics? This panel for the 2013 Modernist Studies Association Conference seeks papers that historicize and theorize the tenability of “formalism” (new, old, or otherwise) in comparative contexts, examining how critical concepts of form are enmeshed in the moment, the medium, the institution, and the culture. <br /> <br />Modernism was always characterized by a radical break with previously established techniques, but how does a self-conscious reevaluation of form lead to, or result from, formalism? For that matter, what exactly is the difference between form and formalism? What other rubrics for thinking about art (psychology, popularity, medium specificity, abstraction, organicism) challenged the notion of “form” in the modernist period? By isolating and comparing multiple versions of “formalism” that differ temporally, culturally, and disciplinarily, this panel seeks to address the critical debates of our era by first investigating how the modernists themselves approached problems of readership and criticism. Once we return “form” to its history, can we remain satisfied with it as an intrinsic term of literary study? Or may we object, along with Virginia Woolf, that the concept of form is an “alien substance... imposing itself upon emotions which we feel naturally”? <br /> <br />Welcome topics include: <br /> <br />The relationship between aesthetic autonomy, material specificity, and modernist temporality <br /> <br />Revisiting New Critical perspectives on the modernist canon <br /> <br />Perspectives on form and formalism that cross institutional and disciplinary boundaries <br /> <br />Questions of how the modernists linked the aesthetic and the philosophical <br /> <br />Analogical treatments of form and medium in modernist music, art, technology, or science <br /> <br />Readings of how modernist readership changed over time <br /> <br />Please submit a 250-word abstract and a brief <br />(2-3 sentence) scholarly biography to Jocelyn Rodal <br />(jocelyn@berkeley.edu) by Wednesday, March 13, 2013.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 13, 2013

For more information, contact: Jocelyn Rodal

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MSA 15: Panel on &quot;Mundane Media&quot;


This is a CFP for the upcoming MSA 15 conference for a panel called "Mundane Media." This panel will explore modernist play with media forms and everyday objects. Paper proposals are welcomed that address any of the following questions. How do historical media forms--like the cinematograph or the telegraph--reshape modernist aesthetic forms? How can everyday objects speak, listen, or mediate in modernist art? How do media logics disrupt or trouble distinctions between the everyday and the event? Please submit paper proposals of ~150 words to jemerype@oberlin.edu by 5 pm on Wednesday March 13th.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 13, 2013

For more information, contact: Jennifer Sorensen Emery-Peck

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Daily Dose: Modernist Intoxications


CFP MSA 15 <br /> <br />Daily Dose: Modernist Intoxications <br /> <br />Literary studies and intoxication have traditionally been associated with Romanticism and its representative aesthetic movements and Orientalist visions. But Modernism also incorporated drugs into its practices—albeit in very different cultural contexts. Still, the Romantic legacy of euphoria, seduction, and “transcendence” (as Keats put it) endures in contemporary culture, whereas Modernist experimentation with substances has made no coherent impression or supplied much productive understanding of the period. This proposed panel will consider the discourse of Modernist drug use to assess the era’s connection between creative practice and intoxication. <br /> <br />Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal (1857) marked a decisive shift in perceptions of narcotics and pleasure, regarding opium use as a wickedness far afield of De Quincey’s “secret of happiness.” Around World War I, now so-called “drugs” became steeped in medico-legal discourse. The nineteenth century’s mind-expanding, exploratory stimulant became the twentieth century’s “drug”—a shift accompanied by language of degeneracy, crime, addiction, and deviant sexuality. What was at stake—politically, socially, culturally, aesthetically—in modernist explorations of intoxication? How did drugs implicate and explicate literary and artistic consciousness? <br /> <br />Freud’s “magical substance” (cocaine) visions; Benjamin’s experiments with hashish (having read Baudelaire’s Artificial Paradises, he proclaimed, “it will be necessary to repeat this attempt independently of this book”); Aldous Huxley’s mescaline-induced "sacramental vision"; Andre Breton’s hostility toward drug use in surrealist experiments with automatic writing; Alice B. Toklas’s “hashish fudge”; Antonin Artaud’s aesthetics of intoxication. And what of drug-induced prose? Jeanette Winterson’s description of the narcotic quality of Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood, suggests a possible shift from authorial intoxication to literary intoxication. <br /> <br />With these diverse attitudes toward being “high,” can we begin to map the contours of a Modernist drug culture? <br /> <br />Intersections between drug use and Modernism may be loosely interpreted. Interdisciplinary papers are welcome, as are studies of high and low cultural texts. <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstract and short CV to Annalisa Zox-Weaver by March 11 <br />annalisazoxweaver@gmail.com <br /> <br />Conference Location: Brighton, UK <br />Conference Starts: August 29, 2013 <br />Conference Ends: September 01, 2013 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: March11, 2013 <br /> <br />For more information, contact: annalisazoxweaver@gmail.com <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 11, 2013

For more information, contact: Annalisa Zox-Weaver

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Postmodern Literature and the Modernist Event


This panel is interested in the politics of modernism’s gravitational pull within postmodern and contemporary literature. Modernism does more than supply the chronological or formal coordinates for a wide range of much later writers. Its relation to the present is a persistent field of concern—one that turns modernism itself into an event that must be continually revisited and rearticulated. The event of modernism has become the subject of a sprawling nostalgia industry and also the setting for a critique of that industry, in literature ranging from Zadie Smith’s _On Beauty_ to Enrique Vila-Matas’ _Dublinesque_, from Ian McEwan’s _Atonement_ to Monique Truong’s _The Book of Salt_. This panel will explore the varied politics negotiated through modernism’s eventfulness. What modernist scenes—whether formal, fictional, or historical—is contemporary literature drawn to? What theories of history or historiography are created by this literature’s time travels? How do these accounts of the past engage questions of development, nostalgia, and perspective? And how are these concepts brought to bear on modern, postmodern, and contemporary politics? What pitfalls may come of this backward glance and how might it intersect key modernist strategies, from the desire for classicism and the mythic to the rupturing directive to “make it new”? <br /> <br />The panel currently includes one paper considering liberalism and queer politics in Kazuo Ishiguro’s _The Remains of the Day_. I am seeking papers that explore other texts (whether fiction, drama, or poetry) and also other national, transnational, or global frameworks. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, U.K.
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 11, 2013

For more information, contact: Christina Walter

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MSA 15: Postmodern Literature and the Modernist Event


MSA 15: Postmodern Literature and the Modernist Event <br /> <br />This panel is interested in the politics of modernism'€™s gravitational pull within postmodern and contemporary literature. Modernism does more than supply the chronological or formal coordinates for a wide range of much later writers. Its relation to the present is a persistent field of concern--one that turns modernism itself into an event that must be continually revisited and rearticulated. The event of modernism has become the subject of a sprawling nostalgia industry and also the setting for a critique of that industry, in literature ranging from Zadie Smith'€™s _On Beauty_ to Enrique Vila-Matas'€™ _Dublinesque_, from Ian McEwan'€™s _Atonement_ to Monique Truong'€™s _The Book of Salt_. This panel will explore the varied politics negotiated through modernism’s eventfulness. What modernist scenes--whether formal, fictional, or historical--is contemporary literature drawn to? What theories of history or historiography are created by this literature’s time travels? How do these accounts of the past engage questions of development, nostalgia, and perspective? And how are these concepts brought to bear on modern, postmodern, and contemporary politics? What pitfalls may come of this backward glance and how might it intersect key modernist strategies, from the desire for classicism and the mythic to the rupturing directive to "œmake it new"€? <br /> <br />The panel currently includes one paper considering liberalism and queer politics in Kazuo Ishiguro'€™s _The Remains of the Day_. I am seeking papers that explore other texts (whether fiction, drama, or poetry) and also other national, transnational, or global frameworks. Please submit a 250-word abstract and a CV to Christina Walter (cmwalter@umd.edu) by Monday, March 11. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, U.K.
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 11, 2013

For more information, contact: Christina Walter

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Puppets, Marionettes, Mannequins and the Damaged Bodies: When an Object Becomes an Event


Puppets, Marionettes, Mannequins and the Damaged Bodies: When an Object Becomes an Event <br /> <br />The panel investigates the function of an inanimate figure of a puppet, marionette, mannequin and the war-damaged body in modernist art, literature and film (other media also welcome). Many modernist artists and writers, such as Picasso, Marinetti, Fernand Leger, Oskar Schlemmer, Ezra Pound, Wyndham Lewis, Jean Rhys, Giorgio de Chirico, Fritz Lang, David Bomberg, Mark Gertler, among many others, were fascinated and inspired by the very idea of the mechanical and fetishised body as an object which became an event. The passion for puppets and mannequins was located in the metaphor they served for dehumanisation technology could cause, an increased mechanization of life, instrumentalisation of the human body and growing impersonality and standardization. Modernist puppets were stripped of humanity just like machines in the industrial era and hence were increasingly appealing to the modernist mind. The simple body of a marionette suited modernist experiments with form and so puppet figures in art enhanced the artists’ departure from naturalism and representation. Mannequins as displayed in shop windows were not only everyday objects of flâneur’s desires but a quintessence of an ideal body which in fashion equalled the standardized mass-produced body with inter-changeable body parts. They became particularly apparent in the post-war city life in contrast, or perhaps as an analogy to war-cripples’ severely damaged bodies with artificial limbs which functioned as automatons. Indeed such an identification of human beings with machines had a much more profound meaning in the face of tragic fatalities of war. In the context of the Great War and the damage and havoc it brought on humanity and the human mind, mannequins and marionettes seemed to be an ideal metaphor that could be used to replace human beings, to go to the front instead of them, fight and kill without a blink of the eye, without any emotional damage to themselves referring to the popular image of the British Tommy often compared to “the mechanical dolls who grin and kill and grin” (Hynes 1990: 117). In this way the inanimate everyday object of a mannequin or a puppet became part of the traumatic event – the war. In art and literature there was an attempt to mechanize the human form, to prove it prone to deformation and hence to turn it into an appropriate material for modernist art – one that could deal with the materiality of people and things. The plasticity, flexibility and jerkiness of the puppet as well as an erasure of emotion intrinsic to mannequins was particularly appealing to the modernist artists. The panel invites paper proposals that are concerned with the modernists’ approach to a dehumanised and mechanical form as embodied in the mannequin, a marionette or a war cripple. <br />Send paper proposals by 10 March to dominika@wa.amu.edu.pl <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2013

For more information, contact: Dominika Buchowska

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MODERNISM AND HOME


A CFP for MSA 15 <br /> <br />MODERNISM AND HOME <br /> <br />Home is a locus of epistemological drifts and emotional investments, and a focal point around which mental and material activities such as shaping of familial memory and cultural identity (stationary or migratory), cross-cultural migration, displacement, and belonging evolve. A superior screen for the projection of our desires, the imagined community of “home” has also traditionally informed the formation and dismantling of broad or parochial political associations; this process has had marked consequences in the modernist context. Concerning themselves almost obsessively with the notions of homelessness and impossible homecoming, the modernist thinkers, writers, artists, and filmmakers characteristically configure home as inherently alienated from itself, suspicious, or, simply, absent. But, for modernists, home is also a specific physical place, localizable or pictured as a body (or part thereof), a space, and a community of peoples, sites, sounds, smells, patterns of behaviour, layers of geology, and vagaries of history. <br /> <br />This interdisciplinary panel seeks to explore the ways in which modernist arts and thought probed the notion of home, espousing it, rejecting it, or revisioning it, in realms such as literature, film, theatre/performance, art, sociology, ethnography, urban planning, and philosophy. Papers investigating the notion of home in the context of less commonly discussed sites and types of the modernist expression are particularly welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Sanja Bahun (sbahun@essex.ac.uk) by March 10, 2013. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2013

For more information, contact: Sanja Bahun

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A CFP for MSA 15


A CFP for MSA 15 <br /> <br />DOCUMENTARY MODERNISM <br /> <br />One of the principles of Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project (1940) is that art never responds to “aesthetic exigencies alone.” Benjamin’s work typifies modernism’s interest in recording cultural history, particularly historical experience excluded from official historiographies. Anthologies, common readers, photographic reportage, and other kinds of compilation use assemblage as a means of production and require different modes of reading. Benjamin’s Arcades Project (1940) and Nancy Cunard’s Negro Anthology (1934) are two examples of documentary modernism. Heroic achievements in their own right, these modernist projects—characterized by their fragmented, contradictory, and suggestive form—share the documentary impulse towards a new historical comprehension. As anthological projects typically work by imposing a shape upon the collected cultural material and asserting curatorial control that material, they raise questions about representation and agency in documentary writing, and about modernism’s critical self-understanding and cultural motivation. We invite papers that explore the aesthetic and cultural thrust of documentary modernism, the modes of reading they invite, and the kinds of value they generate. <br /> <br />This interdisciplinary panel seeks to explore the sociological impulse of modernism and its concern with capturing the dynamics of social life in literature, film, photography, sociology, ethnography, urban writing, and philosophy. Papers investigating the modernists’ approaches to collecting, compiling, and recording cultural experience as part of their aesthetic programs are particularly welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio to Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva (irina.goloubeva@english.su.se <mail to: irina.goloubeva@english.su.se>) by March 10, 2013. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2013

For more information, contact: Dr. Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva

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MSA 15: Religion, Women, and Modernism


A CFP for MSA 15 <br /> <br />Religion, Women, and Modernism <br /> <br />This panel explores the exciting and complex ways in which many modernist women were engaging with questions of religion. During one of their psychoanalytic sessions together, Freud asked H.D. if she wished, "in the deepest unconscious or subconscious layers of [her] being, to be the founder of a new religion." Indeed, H.D. did harbor a wish, more conscious than Freud perhaps realized, to take her religious inheritance and make it "new" -- and she was not alone. Far from simply renouncing religious traditions, modernist women writers were appropriating, rupturing, and revising these religious narratives, often inhabiting a seemingly impossible space between the sacred and the secular, between belief and non-belief. Whether they were engaging with Christianity, Jewishness, mysticism, Catholicism, or the occult, it is clear that questions of religion and belief were politically, socially, psychologically, and spiritually imperative for these women. <br /> <br />This panel invites papers that explore any aspect of this problematic in texts by modernist women. To what degree are modernist women seeking to repudiate, reclaim, revise, or re-imagine religion in their texts? What were their aesthetic, political, moral, social, and psychological investments in these problems? What resources did modernist formal practices offer these women? How might the analysis of religion in women's texts open up fresh avenues of study for feminist scholars of modernism? <br /> <br />Please send a 250 word abstract, along with a brief scholarly biography, to Jenny Hyest (jehc@lehigh.edu) by March 10.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 10, 2013

For more information, contact: Jenny Hyest

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MSA 15: Mapping and Measuring Twentieth-Century Correspondence (Exhibition)


Call for Papers, MSA 15: Mapping and Measuring Twentieth-Century Correspondence <br /> <br />How can digital methods and scholarship help us to capitalize on the everyday genre that is twentieth-century correspondence? <br /> <br />This MSA exhibition aims to showcase, explore, and promote the possibilities of digital tools for scholarship on modern epistolarity. <br /> <br />Letters are uniquely ill-suited to codex publication, and letters scholarship should thus be uniquely bold in its deployment of digital tools. Current software has multiplied the possibilities. Among other things, digital methods allow us to <br /> <br />• Organize and reorganize letters by various attributes—recipient or writer, location or date—and thereby find connections that might otherwise go missing. <br />• Mark and collate letters more efficiently and flexibly. <br />• Deploy location data to expand the spatial theorizing of literary work. <br />• Trace and analyze the material practices that might otherwise be erased in print publication. <br />• Quantify metadata in ways that provide new insights. <br /> <br />This exhibition will describe examples of current digital humanities work about twentieth-century letters—both scholarly findings and procedural challenges. It will offer audience members the chance to ask questions about the outcomes and processes of these projects. It will provide some hands-on experience for audience members with the software available. <br /> <br />We seek submissions from scholars who are currently using digital tools to study, map, or explore correspondence and who would like to be part of a conversation about their work in an innovative format. <br /> <br />Please send a 200-word description of your project, along with a brief scholarly biography (4 sentences maximum), to phillisi@dickinson.edu by March 9. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 09, 2013

For more information, contact: Siobhan Phillips

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MSA 15: Modernism and the Commons


<br />MSA 15: Modernism and the Commons <br /> <br />How can modernism help us theorize aspects of the “commons” (culture as a commons, life-in-common, the multitude, etc.) and what might the concept of the commons contribute to our understanding of modernism? <br /> <br />We are interested in papers that touch on modernist enclosures of the commons (e.g., aggressive assertions of copyright and the implications thereof) as well as modernist contributions to theorizing the commons, the “common reader,” or community. Potential topics range therefore from the cultural economy of modernism, the “common reader,” copyright and intellectual property, the general intellect, the multitude, knowledge work and immaterial labor, among others. <br /> <br />Papers that cross national, historic, generic or disciplinary boundaries are welcome, as are digital humanities papers/projects on modernist archives/texts/artifacts in relation to creative commons, the public domain and open access. <br /> <br />Note: remove the [ ] around the @ in the email address below when sending an abstract!

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 08, 2013

For more information, contact: Mike Frangos

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The Modernist Room


According to Frederic Jameson, the Modernist novel abandoned the panoramic cityscapes of the 19th century realist novel and devised "strategies of inwardness." As Brigitte Munier suggests, the early-20th century protagonist experienced the city "locked within his room, carried away by the cries of shopowners whom Flaubert and Nerval would have encountered walking down the street.” The Modernist room, in these accounts, appears to function as a refuge from a confusing public terrain. <br /> <br />On the other hand, The Omega Workshop was using the domestic interior as a stage to display its opposition to traditional Victorian decorum. Christopher Reed contends, in *Bloomsbury Rooms,* that “Bloomsbury made the conditions of domesticity its standard for modernity, projecting the values of home life outward onto the public realm in both its aesthetic and socio-political initiatives” (5). <br /> <br />This panel examines the tension between the space of the room as an escape from public/political life and the room as a platform for undermining the public/private distinction. What kinds of rooms appear in Modernist texts? What purpose do they serve as metaphors or containers for the harassed Modernist body/psyche? How did thinking and innovation in disciplines -- such as music, interior design, industrial arts, fine arts, film -- change how we think about rooms as enclosures? In what ways did feminist and colonial perspectives undermine traditional notions of the domestic room as a comforting space of home?

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 08, 2013

For more information, contact: Christina Stevenson

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MSA 15: Exhibitions, Modernisms and Everyday Spectacles (roundtable)


EXHIBITIONS, MODERNISMS AND EVERYDAY SPECTACLES (roundtable) <br /> <br />‘As you watch them trailing and flowing, dreaming and speculating, admiring this coffee-grinder, that milk and cream separator, the rest of the show becomes insignificant’. <br /> <br />In writing about the 1924 British Empire Exhibition at Wembley, Virgina Woolf suggests that the audience should be seen as part of the spectacle of the exhibition. She also points to the everydayness of much of what was on display at international exhibitions and world’s fairs, which depended on commercial exhibitors for economic success. <br /> <br />The British Empire Exhibition was the latest in a series of international exhibitions and world’s fairs that had started with the Great exhibition of 1851 at Crystal Palace in Hyde Park. It also shared many similarities with commercial and trade exhibitions such as the Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition (founded in 1908) that were held at venues such as Olympia. Exhibitions were also one of what Elizabeth Darling has called ‘narratives of modernity’ used to reform architecture and design. Exhibitions were thought to be effective forms of publicity for industry and also sources of education and entertainment for the public. Indeed, exhibitions were so popular with the public that they even gatecrashed trade exhibitions that were not intended for them. <br /> <br />This roundtable will be focused on the visual and material cultures of the spectacle of exhibitions. It will discuss the production and distinctiveness of the modern architectures of exhibitions and strategies of display, which often took forms of modernity outside of the modern movement in design. It will consider Woolf’s propositions that in indoor venues ‘Everything was intoxicated and transformed’ but in venues where visitors had to transverse outdoor spaces, ‘letting in the sky’ to visit exhibition pavilions the ‘Exhibition is in ruins’. Much writing on exhibitions has assumed they operate as forms of hegemony to gain consent for imperial and/or national projects. However, the roundtable will particularly focus on the role of exhibition audiences, not only as part of the spectacle but also their agency in resisting and contesting prescribed meanings. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 08, 2013

For more information, contact: Dr Deborah Sugg Ryan

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Vestigial Human Nature in Modernist Literature


This panel for the 2013 Modernist Studies Association Conference seeks to analyze and interpret instances of vestigial essentialism in literary modernism. Literary modernism is often described as a movement that rejected the biological conception of a fixed human nature, consistent across time and place, in favor of a cultural relativism that, similar to behaviorism in psychology or the cultural turn in anthropology, foregrounded the variations and anomalies of human experience, rather than the transcendent similarities. Despite this general rejection, however, lingering notions of human nature persevere in modernism, apparent, for example, in psychoanalysis or primitivism. This panel seeks papers that examine the subsequent essentialism that appears in modernist texts. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of approximately 250 words and a brief (2-3 sentences) scholarly biography. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 08, 2013

For more information, contact: Andrew Yerkes

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Nation, Empire and the Architecture of Everyday Life


How do architectural spaces and the spatial networks they comprise form and make routine the practices of everyday life? How does the literary construction of architectural spaces relate to literary constructions of the nation? In this panel, we will explore the ways that architecture and the everyday are constructed and used in modernist texts, with a precise focus on the interplay between architectural spaces, the everyday, and representations of nation and empire. Nations and empires are at once both large spatial networks and complex fields of discourse; literary representations of space may serve to domesticate the imperial or interrogate its consequences in the home. <br /> <br />Papers that explore nation, architecture and the home through feminist, postcolonialist or other lenses are welcome, as are intersectional papers. Please send abstracts to Harrington Weihl: haweihl@mix.wvu.edu by March 5, 2013.

Conference Location: Brighton, England
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 05, 2013

For more information, contact: Harrington Weihl

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MSA 15: Creativity and contingency


Traditional forms in poetry and prose have often been seen as opposed to accidental, unanticipated, or unseen forces. Writing that takes chance as its defining principle frequently positions itself outside or against the literary mainstream. How might we move beyond this restrictive binary to conceive of creativity in ways that embrace contingency, accident, and/or surprise? Interruptions, distractions, fortuitous forgettings, slips of the tongue/pen, factual or grammatical mistakes, occasions and commissions, joint authorship, collaborations within and across media, constraints of production—in what ways might these factors be integral, rather than opposed, to the creation of art? How have writers and artists, as well as thinkers from disciplines such as philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the social sciences, approached such contingencies? This panel will address these issues via the close study of specific texts as well as the compositional practices that surround them. We particularly seek papers that join theoretical models with close attention to textual/artistic examples. Please send a 250-word abstract, plus a brief bio, to reena.sastri@gmail.com and ericamcalpine@gmail.com by Monday, March 4th.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2013

For more information, contact: Erica McAlpine, Reena Sastri

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MSA 15: The Dada App


What contemporary uses can we make of Dada methods, techniques, innovations, and ideas? Should Dada inform our politics? Can it help to break us out of the postmodern ever-same, or is it the already-been-done, as Peter Bürger'€™s <i>Theory of the Avant-Garde</i> might suggest? Where is the Dada apparatus today? <br /> <br />Papers dealing with all Dada movements, sites, and languages are solicited. All genres are welcome, including, but not limited to, film, music, literature, and visual art. Scholars should reach beyond the innovative reading of individual (anti-)works to address larger questions concerning Dada's relevance. Of particular interest are presentations that analyze Dada in such contexts as gender, sexuality, psychoanalysis, colonial discourse, primitivism, class warfare, geography, and the ascendancy of fascism. <br /> <br />Please submit abstracts of approximately 500 words.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 03, 2013

For more information, contact: Merrill Cole

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'Multitudada'? Hardt, Negri, and the Dada Manifesto in the 21st Century


‘Multitudada’? Hardt, Negri, and the Dada Manifesto in the 21st Century <br /> <br /> <br />“I write this manifesto to show that people can perform contrary actions together while taking one fresh gulp of air”; so wrote Tristan Tzara in his Dada manifesto of 1918. At times, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s 2005 work Multitude reads no better — nor, indeed, no worse — than a Dada manifesto. Exactly what the multitude is remains as elusive as Dada itself. How would we answer the question ‘What is the multitude?’ Could Dada offer us a way to conceptualise, even produce, the multitude? <br /> Whilst we can certainly say that the multitude is not a tomato, Hardt and Negri offer one definition of the multitude “as an internally different, multiple social subject whose constitution and action is based not on identity or unity (or, much less, indifference) but on what it has in common.” Arguably, any conception of Dada and its practitioners must run along similar lines. Indeed, Dada was nothing if not a public ‘art’, nothing if not an international network with at least something in common. Yet at the same time, with its “distrust toward unity,” Dada was able to maintain the difference of the individual artist. “[A]fter all,” as Tzara continues later in his manifesto, “everyone dances to his own personal boomboom.” <br /> There is a sense, then, in Tzara’s manifesto that the singularity is maintained, essential to Hardt and Negri’s conception of the multitude: “The multitude is composed of a set of singularities — and by singularity here we mean a social subject whose difference cannot be reduced to sameness, a difference that remains different.” Even though much Dada ‘art’ suggests a broken subject, particularly in the context of the First World War, this paper will investigate whether there is any sense in which Dada could be utilised in our age of permanent war — the War on Terror, the War on Drugs — to creatively produce the social subject, the multitude. <br /> The possibilities for this — if, indeed, they even exist — I will be terming ‘multitudada’. To the question ‘What is multitudada?’ a response could run: dada as a productive and creative force of the multitude; the multitude creatively producing dada. But as with the question ‘What is Dada?’, the better question here is ‘What can multitudada become?’ <br /> With this new conception of multitudada — which may itself be “nothing, nothing, nothing” — this nothing if not speculative paper will attempt to address how Dada might be used in our increasingly networked world. If, in the words of Matthew S. Witkovsky, Dada had “a radical purpose: to test the meanings of community and artistic identity in this new age of media and technological warfare,” then this radical purpose is just as pertinent today. With the use of a found spam poem, I will attempt to indicate at least the possibility for ‘multitudada’, of the continuing relevance of Dada in the formation of the social subject. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 03, 2013

For more information, contact: Zac Rowlinson

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What is a Modernist Plot?


<br />CALL FOR PAPERS: <br />What Makes a Modernist Plot? A collaborative special session proposal for MLA 2014, organized by Richard Walsh for the International Society for the Study of Narrative and Susan Stanford Friedman for the Modernist Studies Association. <br /> Modernism's supposed resistance to plot needs reconsideration, given an enlarged modernist corpus and new cognitive and rhetorical approaches in narrative theory. 250-word abstract and bio by 1st March 2013; Richard Walsh (richard.walsh@york.ac.uk). <br /> <br /> <br />In her 1925 essay “On Modern Fiction,” Virginia Woolf characterized the typical Edwardian novelist as “constrained, not by his own free will but by some powerful and unscrupulous tyrant who has him in thrall, to provide a plot.” Plot was a Procrustean bed, and Woolf proposed that modern novelists refuse to lie down in it any longer. Since 1925, scholars have tended not only to applaud Woolf’s vivid repudiation of plot but also to apply it generally to modernist fiction, tabulating modernism’s rejections of suspense, emplotment, and other conventional means by which fiction engages our attention through narrative. But recent developments in both modernist studies and narrative studies prompt a reconsideration of modernism’s ostensible plot to overthrow plot. The new modernist studies has begun attending to a broader range of fictions—colonial and postcolonial novels, genre fiction, middlebrow narrative, and other mass cultural forms—that exhibit much greater continuity with forms of plotting familiar from nineteenth-century realism. At the same time, even the undeniable swerves and innovations of modernist plotting have come to seem far less disruptive of established narrative conventions in light of the arguably more extreme departures that postmodernist fiction has made familiar. And developments in narrative theory have complicated the modernist relationship to narrative form: cognitive and rhetorical approaches to narrative conceive of it less as a text type (more or less well-formed) than as a mode of sense making, both innate and highly acculturated, upon which modernist novels draw as strongly as previous fictions in eliciting the engagement of the reader. This panel therefore asks, "what makes a modernist plot?" as a question of both motive and form, and re-examines the issue of modernist plotting in the light of developing scholarly perspectives upon both modernism and narrative. <br />Nb. In the event that this collaborative session proposal is not accepted for MLA 2014, it has a guaranteed place at ISSN 2014, March 27-30 in Cambridge, MA. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: MLA14, USA
Conference Starts: January 01, 2014
Conference Ends: January 06, 2014

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Richard Walsh

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Maverick Voices and Modernity, 1890–1939


“We Speak a Different Tongue” <br />Maverick Voices and Modernity, 1890–1939 <br /> <br /> <br />International Conference, St. John’s College, Durham University, UK, 5-6 July 2013 <br /> <br /> <br />Plenary speakers: Professor Chris Baldick (Goldsmiths College, University of London) and Professor Michael O'Neill (Durham University) <br /> <br /> <br />Call for Papers <br /> <br />With a focus on the fiction, poetry, and drama of the period 1890-1939, “Maverick Voices” registers the diversity of innovation beyond the traditionally defined boundaries of literary Modernism. Famously in “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1924), Virginia Woolf distinguishes between two literary camps: the Edwardians and the Georgians. By praising the Georgians and vilifying the Edwardians, Woolf privileges an aesthetic of what later became identified as Modernism against a continuing tradition of realism. This is indicative of both continuities and discontinuities – between Modernism and, in Yeats’s phrase, those different tongues of nineteenth-century sensibilities – which have prevailed as a persistent presence in much recent literary criticism. <br /> <br />“Maverick Voices” contributes to current debates about where the boundaries of literary Modernism should be drawn. In so doing, our conference explores the alternative visions of those individuals who hover at the fringes of cosmopolitan artistic milieus. Relevant questions that could be explored in relation to these marginal voices are: Does a privileging of Modernism undervalue texts that are perceived to operate outside either the parameters of its understood aesthetic and/or periodization? Are there marginalised or obscure texts whose avant-garde experiments renew a sense of the plurality of types of modernisms? Can the ascription of a proto-Modernist tag expand understandings of how texts respond in distinct ways to the pressures of modernity? Indeed, do some literary texts in their own inventive ways produce an alternative poetics to the widely recognized canon of such authors as Woolf and Pound? To what extent do these texts disrupt or engage in dialogue with critical narratives of Modernism? <br /> <br />By addressing these questions in relation to those responses and counter-responses to literary Modernism our conference aims at highlighting those alternative visions of contemporaneous maverick individuals. It further hopes to challenge strict periodization and suggest new points of inception. Authors of relevance to these vital questions might include, but are not limited to: Ford Madox Ford, D. H. Lawrence, George Egerton, W. B. Yeats, Katharine Burdekin, Arthur Machen, Rebecca West, Evelyn Waugh, Noël Coward, Charlotte Mew, George Bernard Shaw, John Galsworthy, Ella Hepworth Dixon, George Moore, Aldous Huxley, Walter de la Mare, James Elroy Flecker, A. E. Housman, G. K. Chesterton, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Arnold Bennett. <br /> <br />Topics may include but are not limited to: <br />Responses to labels and manifestoes <br />Counter-experiments <br />Individual counter-subjectivities <br />Canonicity and marginality <br />Individuals, groups, and cosmopolitanism <br />Late Victorianism and modernity <br />Poetics of the fin-de-siècle and beyond <br />Continental interludes in Anglo-American modernity <br />Avant-garde and Decadence <br />Science fiction <br />Gothic revivals <br />Innovations in popular fiction <br />New Woman discourse <br />Experimentalism in Fantasy/Romance <br />Experimental Realisms <br />Mysticism/esoteric forms of modernity <br />Pornography/censorship <br />Georgian poetry <br />Writers on the periphery of Modernism <br />Utopian/Dystopian narratives <br /> <br />Proposals for twenty-minute papers on any aspect of maverick voices and modernity should be submitted as email attachments by Friday, 1st March 2013 to maverick.voices@durham.ac.uk. Abstracts should be between 200-250 words. Please state name, affiliation, and contact details in the body of the email. For queries please contact co-organisers by email.

Conference Location: Durham, England
Conference Starts: July 05, 2013
Conference Ends: July 06, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Anthony Patterson

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Modernism and the Queer Ordinary (MSA 15)


“Queer” has become a familiar modifier of “modernism,” to the point that Heather Love could argue in PMLA that “of all the forms of marginal modernism that have surfaced in the past couple of decades, queer modernism seems particularly likely to merge into modernism proper.” The etymological history of the term “queer” shows that it has always signaled deviance, with its connotations of strangeness, oddity, and peculiarity, whether or not the term has been used as a weapon or embraced as an identity. That legacy perhaps clarifies why queer seems to fit so well with the new modernist studies, which has enabled us to understand anew modernism’s multiplicitous, challenging engagements with modernity. <br /> <br />Perhaps less of an obvious fit, but with much potential for modernist studies, is the “ordinary,” which has also come into its own as a “major conceptual category in literary studies,” as Benjamin Madden notes in his review of Liesl Olson’s Modernism and the Ordinary. Olson’s claim that “ordinary experience” is the central subject of literary modernism offers another possible way of rethinking traditional modernist histories. <br /> <br />But the possible union of these terms, a “queer ordinary,” still seems somehow extraordinary; queerness continues to have a conflicted relationship to the ordinary and the everyday. How do, or should, we understand queerness in relation to the ordinary? Is that relationship always oppositional, or can there be a “queer ordinary” that doesn’t tame queer’s dynamic oppositionality? <br /> <br />This proposed panel invites papers that investigate the intersections of modernism, queerness, and the ordinary and the everyday. How do queer modernisms depict everyday life? In what ways are queerness and/or modernism themselves ordinary? How might queer modernisms help us to reinvestigate conceptions of the everyday, possibly disrupting the equivalence between ordinary/everyday and normal/normative? Interdisciplinary papers are welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Mary Wilson by March 1, 2013. Remember to remove the [] from the email address below. <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Mary Wilson

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MSA 15: Religion, Women, and Modernism


A CFP for MSA 15 <br /> <br />Religion, Women, and Modernism <br /> <br />This panel explores the exciting and complex ways in which many modernist women were engaging with questions of religion. During one of their psychoanalytic sessions together, Freud asked H.D. if she wished, "in the deepest unconscious or subconscious layers of [her] being, to be the founder of a new religion." Indeed, H.D. did harbor a wish, more conscious than Freud perhaps realized, to take her religious inheritance and make it "new" -- and she was not alone. Far from simply renouncing religious traditions, modernist women writers were appropriating, rupturing, and revising these religious narratives, often inhabiting a seemingly impossible space between the sacred and the secular, between belief and non-belief. Whether they were engaging with Christianity, Jewishness, mysticism, Catholicism, or the occult, it is clear that questions of religion and belief were politically, socially, psychologically, and spiritually imperative for these women. <br /> <br />This panel invites papers that explore any aspect of this problematic in texts by modernist women. To what degree are modernist women seeking to repudiate, reclaim, revise, or re-imagine religion in their texts? What were their aesthetic, political, moral, social, and psychological investments in these problems? What resources did modernist formal practices offer these women? How might the analysis of religion in women's texts open up fresh avenues of study for feminist scholars of modernism? <br /> <br />Please send a 250 word abstract, along with a brief scholarly biography, to Jenny Hyest (jehc@lehigh.edu) by March 10.

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 21, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Jenny Hyest

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Recreating the Past from the Present: the Spanish Civil War


CFP for MSA-15 <br />“Recreating the Past from the Present: the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939)” <br /> <br />This specific war in a country as estranged, foreign and distant as Spain impacted men and women from different races, religions, ideologies, professions, and skilled and unskilled labor from Great Britain, Ireland, the United States, Canada, and Australia to mention only the ones coming from English-speaking countries. The focus of this panel/roundtable is on writers primarily because they were the ones that created a testament, a written legacy of the significance of the war for everyday men and women, the multitude that Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt see as the foundation of a democratic society based on "an open and expansive network in which all differences can be expressed freely and equally, a network that provides the means of encounter so that we can work and live in common." We read these writers to find the complexity of the everyday people who lived and fought from 1936 to 1939 to “create a different world,” a utopia at a time when they saw change in the midst of turmoil, where precarity was a way of life that allowed them to face death, hunger, imprisonment, and every form of human cruelty imagined. <br /> <br />I wish to focus on novels, stories, plays, and films written/made in this century that reflect back to the Spanish Civil War to recreate a time the writers (novelists, dramatists, storytellers, screenwriters) only know by studying the past and constructing stories based on their imaginary of what happened back then, and how and why specific persons became part of this revolutionary movement. In this ideological approach, specific events are focused to explore the conflation of official records, remembrances, testimonies, and the blurring of the origin of the narrative voice so as to capture the precarious lives of the multitude that openly or secretly participated in this social and political revolution. <br /> <br />Conference Location and date: Brighton, UK August 29-Sept. 1 2013 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: February 22, 2013 <br /> <br />For more information and @mail address for submissions, contact: <br />María Cristina Rodríguez [marzo@caribe.net] <br />

Conference Location: Brighton, UK
Conference Starts: August 29, 2013
Conference Ends: September 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: February 22, 2013

For more information, contact: María Cristina Rodríguez

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&quot;Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader


The Twenty-Third Annual Virginia Woolf Conference will be hosted by Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from June 6-5, 2013. The topic of the conference, Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader, encompasses Woolf’s interactions with/influence on Commonwealth writers, the issues of common wealth, discussions of wealth and gender, colonialism and gender, imperialism, politics, and a host of other related topics. <br /> <br />The conference invites explorations of Virginia Woolf’s work from a range of different disciplinary practices: history, economics, politics, post-imperial/colonial studies, gender studies, psychology, cultural studies, legal studies, anthropology, ethnic studies, indigenous studies, publishing, and visual/art history. We especially welcome papers or performances that: <br /> <br />-explore Virginia Woolf’s interactions with/influence on Commonwealth writers. <br /> <br />-engage with discussions carried on by Virginia Woolf, Leonard Woolf, and other members of their circle on issues of wealth, gender, imperialism, class, and economics. <br /> <br />-read Virginia Woolf as a member of the British Commonwealth, later the Commonwealth of Nations. <br /> <br />Submissions are welcome from common readers, artists, writers, community activists, teachers, students, academics, and administrators. <br /> <br />For paper proposals, please send a 250-word abstract as a Word attachment. For panel proposals, please submit a 250-word abstract of each paper to be presented by each of the three panel participants along with the proposed panel title. We will be using a blind-submission process. Please do not include your name on your proposal. Instead, in your covering email, please include your name(s), institutional affiliation (if any), paper title(s), and contact information. <br /> <br />Proposals and inquiries should be directed to: <br /> <br />virginia-woolf@sfu.ca <br /> <br />The deadline for submissions is 1 February 2013. For more information, please see the conference website: http://www.sfu.ca/woolf <br />

Conference Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Conference Starts: June 06, 2013
Conference Ends: June 09, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: February 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Helen Wussow

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CFP: &quot;The Changing Complexion of Theory in Visual Studies&quot;


CFP:"The Changing Complexion of Theory in Visual Studies" <br />Edited by Roger Rothman and Ian Verstegen <br /> <br />“Theory” is once again experiencing tectonic shifts. Until recently, progressive work on the visual accepted the claims of structuralism and deconstruction regarding the primacy of epistemology over metaphysics, the constructedness of knowledge over its self-givenness, and a general antipathy toward naturalistic explanation. While no monolithic response has risen to dominance, a wide range of new approaches have emerged of late. In an effort to set these new approaches in dialog, we are seeking essays that address the following: <br /> <br />- The emergence of new ontologies and realisms <br />- The impact of neuro-methodologies <br />- The equivocal status of marxism and postmarxism <br />- The rise of new anarchist theory <br />- The erasure of the analytic/continental divide <br /> <br />We intend to submit a full proposal to Cambridge Scholars Publishing, which has expressed an interest in this collection. Please send abstracts (800-1200 words) and a brief bio to rrothman@bucknell.edu and ianverstegen@yahoo.com by February 1, 2013. <br />

Conference Location: Lewisburg, USA
Conference Starts: February 01, 2013
Conference Ends: February 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: February 01, 2013

For more information, contact: Roger Rothman

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TSE at ALA


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2013 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 23-26, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston. Please send proposals (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 15, 2013.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: May 23, 2013
Conference Ends: May 26, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2013

For more information, contact: Nancy K. Gish

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Modernity, Ideology, and the Novel


Modernity, Ideology, and the Novel <br /> <br />For the June 2013 issue of Modern Horizons we invite essays that explore the various philosophical, literary, artistic, and political aspects of modernity, ideology, and the novel. <br /> <br />Although since its emergence as a dominant genre in the 18th and 19th centuries the novel has held an important place in artistic expression and the cultural landscape, with the huge political upheavals and cultural disintegration of the 20th century, the novel has come to be recognised as perhaps the most significant literary art form to measure and critique the ongoing and increasingly fundamentalist tendencies of modern political, religious, and cultural thought. In contrast, while popular and academic theory has addressed and engaged with political, religious, and cultural realities, they have often assumed a reactive stance, and have tended to slip into ideological frameworks. Ideology, on this ground, must be understood in terms of dogma: that is, as a spotlight that touches an aspect of life (whether political, religious, or cultural) but which leaves the fullness of everyday life unaddressed. Unlike a tradition of thought—a landscape of meaning with a capacity for newness and difference—an ideological approach to human existence frames ideas within a closed and preconceived system of meaning. This approach is not only problematic in its practical manifestations—as Nietzsche states, a system of thought is always already inadequate in the face of life—but it also does not allow for a theoretical space in which to engage with the rich possibilities that lie outside ideological thinking. As limited as ideological thinking is, however, many dismissals or attempts to critique ideology unfortunately partake of the same closed and prejudicial way of thinking. Indeed, the impulse toward ideology may be inherent in any theoretical mode of thought which neglects the particular and the concrete. <br /> <br />In the art of the novel, however, we have a tradition of representation and presentation of human reality that lies over against ideology and abstract theory. We understand the art of the novel to be a prosaic exploration of the edifying and idolatrous aspects of culture and thought (whether political, religious, or philosophical); on this ground, the novel is seen in stark contrast to the abstract dimensions of theory. Indeed, we hold that the treatment of ideas and tradition in novels is part of an essentially different mode of engagement than that of theory. For while theory tends toward abstraction, the novel cannot forget the concrete; and while theory may obscure difference by way of general insight, the novel remains, with its emphasis on the particular, an antidote to (ideological) systems of thought, whatever their content. Therefore, the novel provides an essential critique of theory and ideology while it approaches everyday human life and meaning in a manner akin to the impulses of a ‘modern’ way of thinking, a thinking that is understood as an open and attentive stance toward the concrete and the particular. <br /> <br />If ideological and dogmatic forms of thought struggle to apprehend the realities of existence, the novel, with its emphasis on particular stories and concrete situations, inherently resists both absolute meaning and the idolatrous temptations of ideology which obscure or frame reality rather than clarify it. This resistance has been recognised and articulated by many theorists of the novel. In Mikhail Bakhtin’s essays on the novel for example, novelistic discourse is provisional and open-ended, offering realities that are ‘internally persuasive’ rather than authoritative and determined externally; and Georg Lukács connects the novel to the loss of a sense of totality in the modern world and speaks of the transcendental homelessness of the modern subject. For Hermann Broch, the novel is genuine insofar as it clarifies and offers insight into the theological and cultural grounds of everyday life. In a similar vein, René Girard understands the art of the novel to be an exploration of the mimetic tradition founded on theological insights and their adaptation or rejection. Walter Benjamin, in contrasting the impersonal basis and abstract reception of the novel, recognised that the novel was important for understanding modern forms of experience. Finally, Milan Kundera sees the novel as an essential measure for and critique of the worst forms of modern theoretical abstraction and reduction of meaningful experience and expressions of cultural realities. <br /> <br />Novelists, too, have depicted and critiqued religious, political, and philosophical ideology. Some major contributions to this novelistic discourse include Fyodor Dostoevsky, who gave his characters theological and philosophical insights and worked out their limits in his dialogical prose, as well as Thomas Mann, who elaborated on the biblical story of Joseph and his brothers, creating what he considered his masterpiece—a novel of profound depth and length. On the other hand, Salman Rushdie acquired a death sentence for his ironic treatment of Islam in The Satanic Verses, and Nikos Kazantzakis measured his distance from Christianity in his novels on the lives of St Francis of Assisi and of Christ. While DH Lawrence held the novel and its particular presentation of life over against the ‘winding sheets of abstraction,’ Marcel Proust examined the place of memory and culture in the making of modern identity. Franz Kafka illuminated the individual’s confrontation with the law and provided a defense of the individual over against the dark systems of modernity, while Gustave Flaubert critiqued the received ideas central to so much of modernity and represented the vicissitudes of the difficult transition from provincial life to that of the big city. And while Louis-Ferdinand Céline explored ideas of freedom in regards to the individual living the concrete realities of existence (freedoms that all too often clash with the way modern culture and ideology are played out), Bohumil Hrabal used earthy humour to soberly confront the implications of existence in the shadow of political regimes. Finally, a novelist such as Witold Gombrowicz, in political exile, contested the pieties of the displaced through his thorough rejection of both the real and potential ideological idolatries of the insulted and the injured. <br /> <br />Possible essay topics may include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />- epistemology in/and the novel <br />- morality and the novel <br />- religion as/and ideology <br />- the novel and tradition(s) <br />- theories of the novel and modernity <br />- stories in/of religious traditions <br />- the novel, narrative, and law <br />- the novel and fear <br />- the novel, religions, and ideological systems <br />- novelistic discourse and ideological discourse <br />- treatments of the other in the novel <br />- the novel and/as history <br />- treatments of the family in the novel <br />- the role of death in the novel <br />- incest in/and the novel <br />- the novel as secular art form <br />- treatments of heresy in religion and in the novel <br />- presence and idolatry in the novel <br />- limits of affinity: ideology and the novel <br />- the character of modernism and theories of prosaics <br />- fundamentalism and irony in theory and in the novel <br /> <br />Accepted essays will be published in the journal Modern Horizons. Modern Horizons seeks to address, through examining a variety of ideas and artistic works, the endlessly open question of what is meaningful in what we are living. <br /> <br />The name ‘Modern Horizons’ comes with two emphases in mind. We include the word ‘modern’ because we begin with the arts, thoughts, and experiences of our own time. There is an essentially ahistorical sense to our idea of ‘modern,’ as we seek to avoid questions of periodisation or ideas of historical necessity. Our second emphasis is on ‘horizons,’ in the hermeneutic sense of the meeting of disparate interpretations and vantage points through conversation. The notion of horizons is essential to our way of thinking because, from the perspective of our own time and place, we seek to examine and interrogate those inherited, negotiated, and created forms of art and thought which matter directly or indirectly for us, here and now. This thought will involve the ongoing effort to raise, engage with, rehabilitate, and think about ideas that have impact today as they shape and are shaped by us; to this end, we solicit contributions with an emphasis on engagement and insight—contributions whose aims reach beyond their pages. <br /> <br />The essays published in Modern Horizons take the form of thinking in public; that is, we wish to serve as an outlet for thinking that bridges academic and non-academic subject-matter—not as essays tied finally to a particular text, but in the form of exploratory endeavours which may participate in an ongoing conversation about what it means to be human in this world. This aim will be echoed in papers that embody a deliberately essayistic form, whether personal, essential, critical, hermeneutic, or public. <br /> <br />Each issue in Modern Horizons is theme based; these themes may be explored through essays on literature, philosophy, painting, music, architecture, or other forms of art. The freedom afforded by our non-affiliation with a specific academic institution is deliberate, as we desire to link public and academic worlds. This position allows us to explore ideas that are often neglected by academia or the public voice. <br /> <br />Modern Horizons is a peer-reviewed journal and welcomes a variety of submissions: essays, dialogues, interviews, and critical-reviews, in either French or English. <br /> <br />Submissions of approximately 1000-5000 words will be considered for publication. Please direct submissions to editors@modernhorizonsjournal.ca as an attachment in .doc format, following MLA style guidelines. <br /> <br />Deadline for submissions is December 31, 2012. <br /> <br />Modern Horizons <br />modernhorizonsjournal.ca <br />editors@modernhorizonsjournal.ca <br />

Conference Location: (Kingston), (Canada)
Conference Starts: June 01, 2013
Conference Ends: June 01, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: January 14, 2013

For more information, contact: A. Bingham

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