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At Play in the Space Between, 1914-1945


CALL FOR PAPERS: At Play in the Space Between, 1914-1945 <br /> <br />The 15th annual conference of the multidisciplinary society, <br />The Space Between: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945 <br />June 20-22, 2013, DePaul University, Chicago IL <br /> <br /> <br />The 15th annual conference of the Space Between society will explore the multifaceted subject of play as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, film, radio, architecture, or design in any country between 1914 and 1945. From surrealist games to improvisational jazz, from Mrs Dalloway’s party to Archibald Motley’s Nightlife, from the exploits of the “Bright Young People” to the political games of wartime, play figures prominently in the arts and culture of this period. We invite proposals for papers considering any aspect of play—light or dark, free or controlled, experimental or entertaining. Papers that complicate or challenge conventional notions of play are also welcome. <br /> <br />Topics might include: <br />• studies of comedy, parody, burlesque, satire, laughter, or humor <br />• formal or linguistic play in literature, music, art, and other media <br />• theories of play or games in relation to the arts <br />• representations of games or sports <br />• dark, serious, subversive, or transgressive forms of play or humor <br />• cultures of entertainment, leisure, or recreation <br />• constructions of the interwar period as the “Jazz Age” or the “Long Weekend” <br />• political or imperial games <br />• play and the irrational as resistance to bourgeois culture or militarism <br />• playing games with readers, spectators, listeners, or audiences <br />• occasions for play: parties, salons, celebrations, flirtations, holidays, weekends, entertaining the troops <br />• spaces for play: pubs, hotels, resorts, casinos, racecourses, country houses, nightclubs, music halls, picture palaces, dance halls, circuses, parks, schools <br />• objects for play/playful objects: toys, games, equipment, whimsical design <br />• figures associated with play: flappers, dandies, flaneurs, playboys, gamblers, speculators, athletes, children, tourists, entertainers, celebrities <br />• playing with identity: costumes, disguises, impersonation, drag, passing, queering <br />• hoaxes, pranks, cons, jokes, puzzles, riddles, tricks, lies, deception, propaganda <br />• literature, art, or music produced by or for children or inspired by childhood <br /> <br />Keynote Speaker: Dickran Tashjian, Professor Emeritus, Art History, University of California at Irvine. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words along with a short biographical statement to Rebecca Cameron at rcameron@depaul.edu by 7 December 2012. <br /> <br />Conference Organizing Committee: <br />Rebecca Cameron, Department of English, DePaul University <br />Analisa Leppanen, Department of History of Art and Architecture, DePaul University <br />Patrick Deer, Department of English, New York University <br />Christina Hauck, Department of English, Kansas State University

Conference Location: Chicago, USA
Conference Starts: June 20, 2013
Conference Ends: June 22, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: December 07, 2012

For more information, contact: Rebecca Cameron

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Call for submissions to the journal Resources for American Literary Study (RALS)


August 27, 2012 <br /> <br />Dear Members of the Modernist Studies Association, <br /> <br /> We are pleased to report that the new volume of Resources of American Literary Study will soon be published by AMS Press. It'€™s an exceptionally strong volume, featuring a range of work, including the presentation of an unpublished story by H.D. We invite those of you who work on American modernists to consider submitting your work to the next volume. <br /> <br /> Since its founding in 1971, RALS has been devoted to archival discovery and bibliographical analysis. Published as an annual since 2003, it has featured in recent volumes a consideration of hitherto unpublished letters from F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda; a study of the manuscripts of Ernest Hemingway'€™s "€œBig Two-Hearted River"€; a guide to the marine life in Hemingway'€™s The Old Man and the Sea; and an essay on Admiral Mark Bristol€'s recovered war diary, which sheds light on Hemingway'€™s three weeks in Constantinople in 1922. The "€œProspects" series continues to provide expert guidance on the future study of American authors. And the review-essays and reviews continue to provide thoughtful opinion on a broad array of scholarly books, including reference volumes. RALS remains a unique and valued venue in American literary scholarship. <br /> <br /> We are now soliciting submissions for next year's volume, including work on the American moderns. As always, we seek archival discoveries and primary and secondary bibliographies. If you have such work, we welcome your submission. And if you know others who have such work, including graduate students, we would appreciate your passing this letter on to them and encouraging their submissions. Given our schedule, we ask that all submissions for the next volume be sent by November 1, 2012. The work should be double-spaced, with MLA documentation, and emailed as an attachment to jbryer@umd.edu. <br /> <br /> We are happy to add that AMS Press is in the process of making RALS available digitally. For further information on RALS, please go to http://www.amspressinc.com/rals.html. <br /> <br /> We wish you a great beginning to the new semester. <br /> <br /> Yours truly, <br /> <br /> Jackson R. Bryer (University of Maryland) <br /> Richard Kopley (Penn State DuBois)

Conference Location: none, none
Conference Starts: November 01, 2012
Conference Ends: November 01, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: November 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Jackson R. Bryer

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Modernist Moves


Call for Papers: International Symposium on €œModernist Moves€ <br />CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE: EXTENDED UNTIL OCTOBER 31 <br /> <br />MODERNIST MOVES <br />7-8 December 2012, Council Chambers, Brunel University <br /> <br />KEYNOTE SPEAKERS <br />Susan Stanford Friedman, University of Wisconsin-Madison <br />Andrew Thacker, De Montfort University <br /> <br />œModernist Moves€ aims to reconsider our understanding of modernism by situating its aesthetic as an affective response to a world where a sense of place and spatial relations are undergoing fundamental change. The word €œ"move"€ may refer to a change of position or location, feelings and emotions that touch individuals, and the impetus to act by making something happen. In a modernist context, these '€˜moves'€™ call to mind the interplay between modernism as an era of changing relations to space, the emergence of a new sense of affect, and a wider engagement with the world through writing as action. <br /> <br />Until recently, modernist studies have tended to focus on impersonality, detachment, the apolitical, and scepticism as characteristic of modernism. Emotion or affect, when theorized, has been considered largely in terms of feminist and queer theories as well as melancholia, mourning, and (post-war) trauma. This body of work considers the impact of marginalization and pathological states, often as ways of moving beyond prevailing ideologies. What other emotions or affective responses might be considered? Can we see modernism as an era when the "€œstructure of feeling," to borrow a phrase from Raymond Williams, leads to a poetics that appeals to the passions of readers and reading communities, sometimes evoking visceral responses? Does a modernist emphasis on the affective experience and/or aesthetic foster new or deeper forms of social knowledge, critique, and creativity? <br /> <br />In terms of mobility and motion, the burgeoning field of transnational modernisms recognizes that socio-cultural, political, scientific, and economic factors contribute to changing spatial relations during the modernist period. New technologies for travel and communications, the making of modern tourism, shifting trade routes, imperial and colonial (re)mappings, increased and enhanced mobility (including migration within and across national boundaries as well as refugee movements), civil unrest and war, and the rise of globalization are among the factors that contribute to altered relations to space and place. This symposium responds to the spatial turn in modernist studies and builds on recent work in colonial modernisms, geo-political modernisms, planetarity, globalization studies, and peripheral modernisms (J. S. Berman, Peter Brooker and Andrew Thacker, Melba Cuddy-Keane, Laura Doyle and Laura Winkiel, B. H. Edwards, S. S. Friedman, Anna Snaith and Michael H. Whitworth, Susan Stanford Friedman, and the Warwick Research Collective). <br /> <br />€œModernist Moves€ considers affective, emotional, experiential, cognitive, and perceptual responses to a world of increased mobility and shifting relations to place/space. Speakers may wish to focus on the multiple meanings of modernist moves or consider one or more of its concerns with (a) motion/mobility, (b) emotion/affect, and (c) impact or the potential for social transformation. Participants might also revisit the idea that modernism is apolitical or detached from everyday life by interrogating the roles of writers, readers, and literary circulations across borders. <br /> <br />Possible topics/questions include: <br />* What is the relationship between motion and emotion? How are poetics and literary modes of production shaped by this interaction? <br />* How do we track the interplay of affect and space throughout a writer’s career, taking into account various representations in fiction, literary criticism, public engagement, life writing, and so forth. How is an author moved by changing spatial relations? <br />* How do writing and other forms of public engagement move readers to new ways of imagining or understanding the world? How are writing and activism related? Does an emphasis on "€œmodernist moves"€ shed light on the role of the public intellectual, artist, or literary critic? <br />* What spatial paradigms and discourses trouble or affect the writer? Are there discrepancies or continuities in public / private relations to space through writing? <br />* What communities of readership does the writer aim to move? <br />* What role do literary circulations play in producing affective relations across borders? What is the impact of modernist writing in terms of the transnational imaginary? <br />* What role does affect play in the socially transformative potential of modernism? Here speakers might consider social upheaval, precarious conditions, uneven development, terror, war, empire, states of exception, citizenship, cosmopolitanism or the expatriate experience, pacifism, refugee/migrant experiences, and other concerns with the changing world order. <br /> <br />Other interpretations of "€œmodernist moves" are also welcome. <br /> <br />Deadline for Abstracts & Panel Proposals: 1 October 2012 <br />Please submit an abstract (250 words) or panel proposal (for three papers) to ModernistMoves@brunel.ac.uk. <br /> <br />Please remember to include your name, affiliation, and a short bio statement. For panel proposals, please also provide a short statement outlining the rationale for the panel. <br /> <br />Questions <br />For more information, please contact Wendy Knepper at wendy.knepper@brunel.ac.uk. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: London, UK
Conference Starts: December 07, 2012
Conference Ends: December 07, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: October 31, 2012

For more information, contact: Wendy Knepper

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The Ambassadorship of Literature


The Ambassadorship of Literature:€“ a two-day symposium at New York University, 2-3 November 2012 <br /> <br />The figure of the diplomat has received relatively little consideration in the study of transnational literature. We are organizing a symposium on diplomacy and literature that will bring together scholars and practitioners to address the relationship between embodied statecraft and the literary voice in realms of extraterritorial jurisdiction. As agents of mediation, alert to linguistic ambivalence, the ambassador and the author alike fulfill a privileged role of joining and compromise, of mediation and experimentation at the points where cultures and languages meet. <br /> <br />As Timothy Hampton writes in his path-breaking study of Renaissance humanism and the invention of diplomatic rhetoric, Fictions of Embassy (2009), "By considering the intersection of literature and diplomacy we locate the study of literary form in a dynamic context where the terms of political culture are shaped through practices of interpretation and linguistic exchange. For diplomacy is the symbolic political act par excellence...[entailing] the investment of language with multiplicities of nuance, densities of sense, 'a whole world'". <br /> <br />We invite considerations of writer-diplomats such as Pablo Neruda and George Seferis, of theorists of diplomacy from Montaigne to Isabelle Stengers, and of fictions about ambassadors from Proust's fastidious M. de Norpois to the sci-fi Babel of China Mieville'€™s Embassytown. We welcome talks spanning across genres, from poetry to fiction to letters and official documents. While we seek the figure of the envoy across historical periods, our primary focus will be on the development of modern and contemporary ambassadorial practice and its languages. <br /> <br />We are pleased to feature a keynote address, "€œThe Ambassadorship of Poetry," by Philip McDonagh, the current Irish ambassador to Russia and the author of three books of poetry, Carraroe in Saxony (2003), Memories of an Ionian Diplomat (2004) and The Song the Oriole Sang (2010). <br /> <br />Among the questions we hope to consider: <br /> <br />How have writers negotiated their day-jobs as diplomats, or diplomats taken up the task of creative writing? <br />What are aesthetic and formal implications of the public role of the envoy? <br />How are the global aspirations of modernism recast when the state acts as cultural arbiter? <br />What is the continuing role of state patronage in artistic production? <br />What part have ambassadors played in the dissemination of artworks across national and geopolitical boundaries? <br />What is the role of cultural diplomacy today in national and international relations? <br />How have writers depicted the space of the embassy? <br />Discipline, style, tact, discretion – what are the techniques of diplomatic conduct, in person or on the page? <br />How have writers helped shape the diplomatic protocols in decolonizing and postcolonial states? <br /> <br />Please send a 200-300 word abstract and a 100-word biographical note by October 1, 2012 to the conference organizers: <br /> <br />Greg Londe: greg.londe@nyu.edu <br />Caroline Zoe Krzakowski: ck78@nyu.edu <br />

Conference Location: New York, United States
Conference Starts: November 02, 2012
Conference Ends: November 03, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: October 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Caroline Zoe Krzakowski

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€œThe Ambassadorship of Literature a two-day symposium at New York University, 2-3 November 2012


The Ambassadorship of Literature€“ a two-day symposium at New York University, 2-3 November 2012 (Deadline extended) <br /> <br />The figure of the diplomat has received relatively little consideration in the study of transnational literature. We are organizing a symposium on diplomacy and literature that will bring together scholars and practitioners to address the relationship between embodied statecraft and the literary voice in realms of extraterritorial jurisdiction. As agents of mediation, alert to linguistic ambivalence, the ambassador and the author alike fulfill a privileged role of joining and compromise, of mediation and experimentation at the points where cultures and languages meet. <br /> <br />As Timothy Hampton writes in his path-breaking study of Renaissance humanism and the invention of diplomatic rhetoric, Fictions of Embassy (2009), “By considering the intersection of literature and diplomacy we locate the study of literary form in a dynamic context where the terms of political culture are shaped through practices of interpretation and linguistic exchange. For diplomacy is the symbolic political act par excellence…[entailing] the investment of language with multiplicities of nuance, densities of sense, ‘a whole world.’” <br /> <br />We invite considerations of writer-diplomats such as Pablo Neruda and George Seferis, of theorists of diplomacy from Montaigne to Isabelle Stengers, and of fictions about ambassadors from Proust’s fastidious M. de Norpois to the sci-fi Babel of China Miéville’s Embassytown. We welcome talks spanning across genres, from poetry to fiction to letters and official documents. While we seek the figure of the envoy across historical periods, our primary focus will be on the development of modern and contemporary ambassadorial practice and its languages. <br /> <br />We are pleased to feature a keynote address, “The Ambassadorship of Poetry,” by Philip McDonagh, the current Irish ambassador to Russia and the author of three books of poetry, Carraroe in Saxony (2003), Memories of an Ionian Diplomat (2004) and The Song the Oriole Sang (2010). <br /> <br />Among the questions we hope to consider: <br /> <br />How have writers negotiated their day-jobs as diplomats, or diplomats taken up the task of creative writing? <br />What are aesthetic and formal implications of the public role of the envoy? <br />How are the global aspirations of modernism recast when the state acts as cultural arbiter? <br />What is the continuing role of state patronage in artistic production? <br />What part have ambassadors played in the dissemination of artworks across national and geopolitical boundaries? <br />What is the role of cultural diplomacy today in national and international relations? <br />How have writers depicted the space of the embassy? <br />Discipline, style, tact, discretion – what are the techniques of diplomatic conduct, in person or on the page? <br />How have writers helped shape the diplomatic protocols in decolonizing and postcolonial states? <br /> <br />Please send a 200-300 word abstract and a 100-word biographical note by October 1, 2012 to the conference organizers: <br /> <br />Greg Londe: greg.londe@nyu.edu <br />Caroline Zoe Krzakowski: ck78@nyu.edu <br />

Conference Location: New York, USA
Conference Starts: November 02, 2012
Conference Ends: November 03, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: October 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Caroline Zoe Krzakowski

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British Modernism &amp; Taste: Bringing the World Inside (NeMLA 2013)


Literally, taste is connected with gustatory pleasure. Figuratively it has its place in the philosophy of aesthetics, and in discourses of social manners and class. Exploring British modernism'€™s preoccupation with taste this panel asks how might a wider critical approach to taste--€”attention to literal and figurative--”inform our understanding of British modernism? By 09/30/12 please send your 300-500 word abstracts and a brief bio to Michael D. Becker, mdbecker@my.uri.edu with "€˜NeMLA 2013"€™ as the subject. For an extended CFP prompt and additional details on this panel, please visit: http://www.cfplist.com/CFP.aspx?CID=557

Conference Location: Boston, MA
Conference Starts: March 21, 2013
Conference Ends: March 24, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2012

For more information, contact: Michael Becker

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Robert Lowell Unbound


This panel at NEMLA at Tufts U. will explore aspects of Robert Lowell's poetry that may be repressed in analyses of his work that "bind" Lowell to terms of tradition or to biography. Unconsidered in such analyses are Lowell's antitraditional stylistic and formal features, as well as ways that Lowell's identities within his verse may be shaped by fantasy rather than being reflections of literal biography. Criticism of Lowell's career at large is often bound to biography at the expense of a consideration of many formal and stylistic matters; Lowell has often been bound to New Critical genealogies with T.S. Eliot as a patriarch, but Lowell (post-1959, especially) has an obvious and under-explored stylistic affinity to William Carlos Williams; Lowell has been bound to terms of literal history at the expense of a consideration of Lowell's interest (as he put it in his afterthought to Notebook) in "surrealism" or "unrealism;" Lowell has been bound to terms of masculine grandiosity, often on a sublime or mythic scale, at the expense of a consideration in his interest in the antiheroic, the pragmatic, the ordinary, or aspects of identity conventionally regarded as feminine. This panel thus affords openings for explorations of the unconventional, antitraditional, or overlooked aspects of one the major American poets of the twentieth century.

Conference Location: Boston, USA
Conference Starts: March 21, 2013
Conference Ends: March 24, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2012

For more information, contact: Dr. Phillip Beard

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TSE at Louisville Conference


The T. S. Eliot Society will again offer two ninety-minute sessions at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900. The first of these will be an open session that invites abstracts on any subject reasonably related to Eliot. The second will specifically consider Eliot's use of, or response to, aspects of nineteenth-century culture, including but not limited to literature (Romantic, Victorian, or Symbolist poetry in particular), literary criticism, journalism, philosophy, other art forms, or science. <br /> <br />Those interested should send a 300-word abstract. Please include the following information with your abstract: <br /> <br />Name <br />Home Address <br />E-mail address <br />Telephone number <br />Academic affiliation (if applicable) <br />Paper title <br />Brief personal biographical note (up to 150 words) <br /> <br />For further information, please visit the conference website: www.thelouisvilleconference.com. <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Conference Starts: February 21, 2013
Conference Ends: February 23, 2013

CFP Submission Deadline: September 01, 2012

For more information, contact: John Morgenstern

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T. S. Eliot Society


THE 33rd ANNUAL MEETING OF THE T. S. ELIOT SOCIETY <br /> <br />Keynote speaker: Daniel Albright, Harvard University <br /> <br />1. CALL FOR PAPERS. The Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at the annual meeting in St. Louis. Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be forwarded by June 15, 2012, to the President, David Chinitz, by email (dchinit@luc.edu). <br /> <br />Papers given by graduate students and scholars receiving their doctoral degrees no more than two years before the date of the meeting will be considered for the Fathman Young Scholar Award. Those eligible for this award should mention the fact in their submission. <br /> <br />For further information, please see our website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot). <br /> <br />2. CALL FOR PEER SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS: SOUND IN ELIOT'S POETRY <br />Led by Lesley Wheeler, this MSA-style seminar will focus on the aural/oral aspects of Eliot's writing. Any approach is welcome but possible topics might include Eliot's engagement with the soundscapes of the period; his recordings; speech, music, and noise as tropes; the interplay of voices in his verse drama; or the sonic features of his poetry, including rhythm, rhyme, and other appeals to the mind's ear. Some of the questions we will discuss, depending on the interests of the participants, might be: How do Eliot's textual voices and voiced texts compare to other contemporary soundings? What ideas about poetic genres come into play? How does his handling of poetry's aural elements evolve over time? <br /> <br />Professor Wheeler is the author of Voicing American Poetry: Sound and Performance from the 1920s to the Present (Cornell, 2008), among other books. Her most recent poetry collection is Heterotopia, winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize (2010). She has held fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and other grantors, and won a 2012 Outstanding Faculty Award from the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia. Her current research topics include virtual and transnational poetic communities; the role of rhyme in contemporary writing; and lyric poetry as speculative fiction. <br /> <br />The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close July 1st. Seminarians will submit 4-5 page position papers by e-mail, no later than September 1st. To sign up, or for answers to questions, please write Frances Dickey (dickeyf@missouri.edu). <br /> <br />For further information, please see our website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot). <br />

Conference Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Conference Starts: September 28, 2012
Conference Ends: September 30, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: June 15, 2012

For more information, contact: David Chinitz

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Hegel and MOdernism


Hegel and Modernism <br /> <br />This panel takes up a simple, but perhaps exacting question: What can the study of Hegel contribute to our understanding of modernism now? <br /> <br />Rather than enumerate Hegel’s many legacies in social theory and philosophy from the nineteenth century onward, this panel asks instead how attention to Hegel’s philosophy, which inscribes time and change into the very stuff of concepts, might illuminate certain aspects of modernist art and writing. We are interested in how incompleteness and necessity get configured in modernist constellations and how the relationship between existential time and the time of History is conceived. We are also interested in the after-life of Hegel’s work on subjectivity: Are some modernist texts responsive to Hegelian models of expression as the locus of subject formation? Can this model be extended to consider along Hegelian lines possible conflicts between values of expression and value as ethics has to conceive it?. Can the study of Hegel tell us anything about how time is made to appear in modernist lyric and narrative? Or about intersubjectivity as struggle for mutual recognition? Or about how a Bildungsroman or a Kunstlerroman can be written? Or about how to imagine history’s end? <br /> Finally we welcome essays on works that grapple with Hegelian methodology for dealing with contradiction. And we welcome papers that reverse the direction of question, and ask how literary modernism animates Hegel. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Send 250-300-word abstracts to Charles Altieri (altieri@berkeley.edu) by April 2, 2012. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: May 15, 2012

For more information, contact: Charles Altieri

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The Spectacle of Modern Military Movements


From the trenches to the atom bomb, the modernist period was disturbingly defined by new military realities, ideologies, and mythologies that spread the globe. New forms of conflict and revolution were not limited to the battlefield, however. Militarism affected everything from art and literary movements to class, race, and gender relations. Consider for example the militant poetic ideals of Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot, or Virginia Woolf's exploration of military fashion as a form of masculine spectacle, or the effects of Hemingway's war experiences on his narrative style. In what ways might these modern military movements be conceived as a form of spectacle? How did the political desire to display power and allegiance affect military discipline and techniques of destruction? Or, how were these military spectacles then incorporated into various works of art? How did military spectacle affect those serving in the military versus civilians at home? What connections might be made between authorship and authoritarianism in regards to militant discipline? What of the spectacle of propaganda and how did it connect art with military? <br /> <br />This panel considers these questions and others related to the spectacle of modern military movements in the intervening period between the beginning of World War 1 and the end of World War 2. We welcome papers from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including but not limited to: literature, architecture, economics, history, historiography, film studies, military theory, fashion, philosophy, social science, political science, etc. <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts and CVs to Katherine Thorsteinson (thorstek@cc.umanitoba.ca) or Jeremy Strong (jeremy.strong@gmail.com) by April 5th. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2012

For more information, contact: Katherine Thorsteinson

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Moving Modernisms


"Moving Modernisms"€ aims to reconsider our understanding of modernism by situating the modernist aesthetic as an affective response to a world where a sense of place and spatial relations are undergoing fundamental change. The word "€œmoving"€ can refer to a change of position or location, feelings and emotions that touch one and the impetus to act or make something happen. <br /> <br />In a modernist context, the notion of moving calls to mind the interplay between modernism as an era of changing relations to space, the emergence of a new sense of affect and a wider engagement with the world through writing as action. In the context of the MSA conference, papers that place an emphasis on spectacle are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please email an abstract (250 words) and a short bio to wendy.knepper@brunel.ac.uk by April 5th.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, United States
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 05, 2012

For more information, contact: Wendy Knepper

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Modernist Lives, Precarious Lives


Although much recent criticism in modernist studies has focused on the everyday and the ordinary, this panel proposes instead to look at the precarious. The term precarity has been heard more and more frequently in the disciplines of political philosophy, economics, anthropology, and critical theory, but it has only begun to make its way into literary studies. Current discussions of precarity are shaped by the work of Paulo Virno, who describes it as 'the chronic instability of forms of life,'€ and by Judith Butler, who conceives of precarity as a shared vulnerability on the basis of which we might found a tentative community. In _Vies ordinaires, vies precaires_ (_Ordinary Lives, Precarious Lives_; Seuil, 2007), the French philosopher Guillaume le Blanc refers to precarity as the unraveling of the socially-constructed self, the '€œunmaking'€ of making. He raises the following question: '€œif precarity tends to disqualify ordinary lives, utterly destroying their creative capacities, could we not seek the elements that would reanimate these capacities by analyzing the counter-use of the voices of precarious lives?' <br /> <br />While the invisibility and social death of the precarious individual might seem like an odd fit for a conference whose theme is spectacle, the voices of precarity often arise in unexpectedly spectacular ways. Le Blanc analyzes the reappropriation of the acronym CPE€ (€œ'contrat premiere embauche€') by demonstrators protesting against a law, proposed by Dominique de Villepin in 2006, that would have permitted the firing of contracted employees without explanation. Changing CPE to 'chomage, precarite, exclusion,' or 'unemployment, precarity, exclusion,' precarious workers engaged in an act not only of radical critique, but also of translation. This panel looks at how modernist artworks '€œtranslate' the voices of precarity. In doing so, these papers explore how the amelioration of precarious lives requires the exercise of creative powers in language. Topics might include the relationship between literature and capital; affects of precarity; new ontologies of the lyric; figures of the collective, the multitude, and the common(s) in fiction, poetry, drama, or film; the appropriation of traditional forms of narrative and poetry by colonial subjects; the ethics of vulnerability and the politics of care; the relationship between bare life and precarious life; poverty and representation. <br /> Please send an abstract (250 words) and a short bio to Walt Hunter (weh5b@virginia.edu) by April 4th.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 04, 2012

For more information, contact: Walt Hunter

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Race, Perception, and Modernist Spectacle (MSA 14)


CFP: Race, Perception, and Modernist Spectacle <br /> <br />Gertrude Stein once wrote, "I believe in reality as Cezanne or Caliban believe in it." While scholars have exhaustively analyzed the relationship between modernist literature and modern painting, they have been more reluctant to take up the second reference. How does the modernist enterprise exploit Caliban's fraught and subjugated relation to reality? How, in turn, does the sexually threatening, "primitive," and racialized figure inform modernism's preoccupations with perception and spectacle? This proposed panel seeks papers that examine the intersections of race, perception, and modernism. From W.E.B. DuBois's "double consciousness" and the primitivism of Stein, Picasso, and Carl Van Vechten to the spectacular entertainments of the Harlem Renaissance and the "cinematic" modernisms of Claude McKay and Jean Toomer, modernists frequently represent race and perception as intertwined phenomena. How do philosophical, psychological, and scientific modernisms instrumentalize or neglect race in their discussions of mind and body? For what uses--questionable, laudable, ideological--do modernists mobilize racial spectacles in their art? This panel seeks papers dealing with any aspect of race, psychology, and perception in the modernist era. <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts to Joshua Lam at jdlam@buffalo.edu by April 4, 2012. This is a proposed panel, pending acceptance by the MSA. Please visit the MSA website for more details about the 2012 conference (October 18-21, Las Vegas): <br />http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa14/ <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, United States
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 04, 2012

For more information, contact: Joshua Lam

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Modernist Personae and the Legacy of Double-Consciousness


This panel revisits W.E.B. Du Bois's famous articulation of the problem of racial double-consciousness in relation to modernist literary practice. It considers ways in which modernist writers recast what Du Bois saw as a debilitating split between "two unreconciled strivings" into a powerful model for literary production that could be both autobiographical and experimental. How do we understand authors who seem to have intentionally resisted "merg[ing]" contradictory versions of themselves into a coherent authorial identity? And in a modernist moment that lauded irony, fragmentation, and the use of personae, what is the relationship between these aesthetic techniques and the lived experience they claim to mask (or as Du Bois might have it, to veil)? A case in point is Jean Toomer, whose conversion to Gurdjieffian mysticism after writing the modernist masterpiece, Cane, has both puzzled scholars and led them into reasserting a classical division between his written work (as finished, expressed, materialized) and the lived experience that exceeds it (ineffable, mystical, immaterial). And yet, Toomer's copious autobiographical writings post-Cane may also be seen as (and, indeed, appear to avow) a form of practical double-consciousness associated with the Gurjieffian principle of "non-identity," whereby any single authorial "truth" is always already destabilized by its potential re-formulation. "Mysticism," it turns out, is thus one of the ways Toomer resists a hegemonic—and so, mystifying—reception of his work. <br /> <br />This panel invites papers that explore authorial personae that negotiate between lived experience and its cultural and aesthetic encoding, seeking to reconcile "low" modernist memoirs and ethnographies with "high" modernist abstraction. Papers may address Harlem Renaissance writers like Toomer, who redoubled themselves; or, to consider how, and to different effects, others like Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, or Ralph Ellison, may have sought less to lift Du Bois's "veil" than to understand race itself as a paradigm for the broader contradictions, and possibilities, of authorship. We also welcome papers that broadly consider modernist personae within their social and autobiographical contexts. <br /> <br />Please send paper proposals of 300 words and short scholarly bios (no more than three sentences) to Ingrid Diran (igd3@cornell.edu) and/or Cecily Swanson (chs32@cornell.edu) by April 4, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, United States
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 04, 2012

For more information, contact: Ingrid Diran

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European Power Adapters


MSA 14: Modernism and Spectacle <br />We are looking for 1 or 2 other papers to complete our panel. We are especially interested in papers examining shifting power discourses in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere in Europe. <br /> <br />Send abstracts of 250-300 words and a brief biographical note by Wednesday April 4th to Philip Keel Geheber: geheberp@tcd.ie <br /> <br />Many of the major works of Anglo-American modernism explore the power shifts that took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. During the period many long-standing political and social power relations were dramatically altered. The traditional roles of the state and the church were revised, as well as fundamental changes to traditional understandings of class and gender. This panel will focus on the representations of power which emerged from continental Europe in the nineteenth century and which played such an important part in these power shifts. It will focus consideration on how these representations affected representations within early Anglo-American modernism. Submissions are welcome from any discipline and may treat a wide range of critical, historical, and/or theoretical concerns. We especially hope to see proposals for papers on the representation of power relations in gender discourse. <br /> <br />The two papers we already have are: <br /> <br />Philip Keel Geheber: Zola's Spectacles of Power <br /> <br /> This paper will examine Emile Zola's depictions of state applied power through the public spectacles of theatre and modern warfare. Frequently cited as an important precursor to Modernism (or even proto-modernist writer as Gyorgy Lukacs' criticism implies), Zola's naturalist style predicated on highly pictorial representations begins to demonstrate this shift that will become increasingly foregrounded by later Modernist novelists. His prose style initially seems simply to develop standard realist representation to its logical extreme, but as I will demonstrate, it also begins problematizing the mastery of subject-character over object-image as well as earlier generally accepted power relations between reader and text. <br /> The texts that this paper will primarily focus upon are Nana and La Debacle. The first novel's depiction of the Parisian theatre world is in many ways a precursor to Modernist depictions of prostitution. The juxtaposition of the theatre demimonde with brothels and prostitution intimately links these two public spheres as the theatre is most clearly a spectacle for public visual consumption while the filles publiques, who are often these same theatre actors and singers, are equally consumed and in the public eye. The state is implicated in these dissipations through Nana's relationship with Count Muffat, the Chamberlain of the Empress, and at the novel's close shown to be impotent as the Franco-Prussian war begins. La Debacle's portrayal of the Second Empire's fall to the Prussians at Sedan and the disaster of the Commune relies on theatrical analogies of the spectacle to describe the modern theatre of war. State power is problematized through both of these treatments of public spectacle, especially as it seeks to assert control over the women and lower orders of its own population and wishes to exert its ideals over other states to justify and expand its values and influence. <br /> <br /> <br />Robert Baines: Uber Manner und Frauen: Joyce, Nietzsche and the Gender of Power <br /> <br /> The two most direct references to Nietzsche within Joyce's oeuvre occur in "A Painful Case" and the "Telemachus" episode of Ulysses. In the former, the narrator observes that "two volumes by Nietzsche" stand on Mr James Duffy's shelves: Thus Spake Zarathustra and The Gay Science. In the latter, Buck Mulligan describes himself as the 'Ubermensch,' labels Haines and himself "supermen," and concludes a mock-Biblical quote with the words "Thus spake Zarathustra." The references to Nietzsche in "A Painful Case" and Ulysses are connected by the fact that, on both occasions, Joyce references Nietzsche in order to illuminate a male character's attitude towards women. In "A Painful Case," Mr James Duffy asserts that "friendship between man and woman is impossible because there must be sexual intercourse." This assertion, which follows immediately after the narrator's mention of Duffy's "two volumes by Nietzsche," repeats Nietzsche's declaration that "woman is not yet capable of friendship" in Thus Spake Zarathustra. In Ulysses, Buck Mulligan's description of himself as the Ubermensch follows his observation that "redheaded women buck like goats" and his discovery that his "twelfth rib is gone." Mulligan's attitude towards women is quite the opposite of that of Duffy. Rather than regarding the male-female bond as an insoluble problem, he draws attention to his former sexual conquests. Yet, in asserting that his "twelfth rib is gone," he undermines the notion of sex as intercourse. Adam's missing rib will become Eve. Consequently, Mulligan's overmanliness is the product of the removal of the feminine from within him. Neither Duffy nor Mulligan is capable of a meaningful relationship with the opposite sex. This is because both, in their very different ways, regard themselves as supermen. <br /> This paper will examine the relationship between Joyce's two most explicitly Nietzschean characters. It will consider how Duffy and Mulligan's understandings of power and control shape their relationships with women. It will explore how these two characters reflect Joyce's changing understanding of Nietzsche's ideas. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, US
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 04, 2012

For more information, contact: Philip Keel Geheber

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The Spectacle of Obscurity (MSA 14)


"€œIn popular music today," Daniel Tiffany observes at the opening of Infidel Poetics (2009), "€œthere is a flourishing market in poetic obscurity-€”-in lyrics composed in various kinds of slang, jargon, or patois, which make little or no sense to most listeners."€ For Tiffany, this lyric obscurity-€”-a phenomenon he traces from the Sphinx'€™s riddle to the underworld practice of canting speech to Mallarme's prose-€”-is precisely the condition for the "€œcelebrity and publicity"€ of such texts: the uninitiated reader or listener "€œis willing to pay for the pleasure of cruising the unknown in a text." <br /> <br />In Tiffany's account, then, the obscure is inherently spectacular. But modernist studies has yet to contend fully with his argument, which offers a reassessment of the history of lyric poetry and a powerful critique of notions like difficulty and privacy. This panel invites papers that respond to, build on, or propose challenges to this account of the relationship between obscurity, spectacle, and the public. How, for example, might we reread the canonical and non-canonical writers of international modernism within the genealogy of lyric obscurity? How does the concept of obscurity augment our understanding of vernacular modernisms? How has obscurity contributed to the modernist cultures of celebrity and publicity so rigorously explored in recent studies like Aaron Jaffe'€™s Modernism and the Culture of Celebrity (2005) and Jonathan Goldman'€™s Modernism is the Culture of Celebrity (2011)? What is the role of obscurity in exhibitions of modern and contemporary art? What kinds of expressive communities do obscure texts and artworks entail? Papers from all disciplines dealing with all media and genres are welcomed. <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts and a short bio to josh.schneiderman@gmail.com by April 3, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2012

For more information, contact: Josh Schneiderman

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Colonial Spectacles, Modernist Afterlives (MSA 14)


From the Wonder House in Kipling's Kim (1901), to the sculpture of Jacob Epstein and art criticism of Roger Fry, to the unmasking of the egwugwu in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart (1958), the visual arts of colonized spaces have been of central interest to global modernism. This panel seeks papers that consider the relationship between modernism and non-Western visual arts. The phrase "colonial spectacle" could be taken to mean the spectacles created by the appropriation or collection of art objects, as in the Kipling example, or the indigenous spectacles in which art objects are socially embedded, as in the Achebe example. <br /> <br />This panel is particularly interested in papers that challenge conventional narratives of primitivist appropriation, and that respond to art historian Rupert Richard Arrowsmith's recent call, in Modernism and the Museum (2010), for work that recognizes the "possibility of multi-directional, transnational exchange in aesthetic concepts, art-historical knowledge, and literary and artistic technique." Accordingly, papers that present alternatives to narratives that position non-Western art objects as nothing more than passive sources of inspiration for European modernist innovation would be especially welcome. <br /> <br />Possible topics might include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br /> - Critiques of primitivism and the problems with these critiques <br /> - Ekphrasis <br /> - Museum studies <br /> - History of art criticism <br /> - Intersections among literature, art history, or anthropology <br /> - Book history and paratextual analysis <br /> <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstracts and CVs to Mark DiGiacomo (mjdigiacomo@gmail.com).

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2012

For more information, contact: Mark DiGiacomo

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&quot;Harlem Spectacles&quot;


In the chapter “Spectacles in Color” in his autobiography The Big Sea, Langston Hughes describes the famous Hamilton Club Lodge Ball as the “Strangest and gaudiest of all Harlem spectacles.” For Hughes, the ball where “men dress as women and women dress as men” is representative of Harlem life in the 1920’s. After positioning the drag ball within the broader context of Harlem life—including Countee Cullen’s wedding and the church services of Rev. Dr. Becton—Hughes comes to the conclusion that “Harlem likes spectacles of one kind or another.” <br /> Recent scholarship has begun to examine the Harlem Renaissance in light of these types of spectacle. This focus on Harlem’s spectacular quality in the 1920’s has expanded previous understandings of the Harlem Renaissance, exploring it in terms of a dynamic interplay between various sexual and racial identities. Due to the unique spatiotemporal conditions of Harlem in the 1920’s as a site of migration for rural African Americans and a popular destination for whites escaping Prohibition, Harlem can be read as providing a space for interplay between various social groups, sexual identities, and ethnicities. Contemporary criticism reveals that the Harlem Renaissance’s artistic output is, in part, a product of these urban confluences. Moreover, this dynamic confrontation is apparent in the kinds of spectacles Harlem enjoys. Papers should expand upon this role of spectacle in Harlem’s historical, social, or artistic productions. <br /> Please send abstract (250 words) to Matthew Hannah (mhannah@uoregon.edu) and include a brief bio. Especially interested in getting a professor or degree holder to round out the panel. Deadline extended to April 3rd.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 17, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 03, 2012

For more information, contact: Matthew Hannah

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Modernism, Transnationalism, and the Law


The recent transnational turn in literary studies has revolutionized how we talk about many of the canonical objects of modernist studies: the manifesto, little magazines, immigration, urbanization, and cosmopolitanism. But to what extent can we “transnationalize” modernist engagements with the law? On the surface, the national exceptionalism encoded in the legal doctrine of citizenship would seem resistant to transnational reading strategies. And yet, the slow granting of autonomy to European colonies over the first half of the twentieth century raised significant questions about the scope and application of modern legal forms across national borders. Parliamentary devolution created spaces in which legal authority was uneven, split between metropolitan legislatures and their colonial counterparts; while the concept of imperial citizenship often provided colonial and diasporic communities with access to a rhetoric of equal rights absent from their day-to-day lives. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to reappraise modernists’ engagement with the law, asking how individual authors, communities, and nations utilized particular legal statutes, or the idea of legality in general, to formulate citizenship claims within and across national borders. Through what generic forms did European and colonial writers attempt to harness legality to their own ends? Did modernist forms disrupt liberal proceduralism, or cultivate new forms of proceduralism more appropriate to a global arena? And in what ways did international laws governing copyright, national sovereignty, and financial exchange establish extra-national spaces for writers and migrants to inhabit? <br /> <br />Potential topics include (but are not limited to): <br /> <br />• The role of copyright in disseminating new forms of personhood (colonial, transnational, cosmopolitan, etc.) <br />• Contract law and the global spread of capitalist markets <br />• Visions of the public sphere in civil legislation <br />• Human rights before the Geneva Convention <br />• The treatment of transnational religions in the law <br />• Devolutionary governance and imperial federation <br /> <br /> <br />Interested parties should send a 300-word abstract and a brief CV to Matt Eatough (matthew.eatough@vanderbilt.edu) by April 2, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 02, 2012

For more information, contact: Matt Eatough

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Modernist Spectacles of Disability


Modernist Spectacles of Disability (MSA 14) <br /> <br />This panel invites papers that explore the representation of disability in modernist literature. Over the past ten years, modernist studies has embraced the development of critical literature that considers this topic. Scholars such as Michael Davidson have produced work that begins to question the normative assumptions underpinning our critical practices. This panel looks to build on their findings by presenting papers that provide unconventional readings of disability in modernist literature, either in lesser-known modernist texts or via untraditional methodological approaches. After World War I, physical and cognitive disabilities began to appear in literature and art with much greater frequency than ever before. For example, texts like William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury (1929) and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway (1925) explore the cognitive states of individuals with disabilities in relation to those of “able-bodied” individuals. This panel looks to examine such formal approaches by incorporating contemporary scholarship from disability studies. What connections exist between modernist aesthetic (or, more specifically, literary) techniques and the increased presence of disability in modernist art? How do texts like these push the boundaries of literary representation? In general, modernist texts lead us to question the conventions that guide our practices for reading, writing, and interacting socially. What are these conventions, and what can knowledge about the experiences of disabled individuals reveal about our participation in these activities? <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of 250 words to Claire Barber at cbarber3@illinois.edu by April 2, 2012. Include your name, paper title, institutional affiliation and position, contact information, and a short scholarly bio. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 02, 2012

For more information, contact: Claire Barber

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Modernist Reputations (MSA 14)


Modernist Studies Association 14: Modernism & Spectacle (The Flamingo Hotel) <br /> <br />Panel Organizer: Will Scheibel, Indiana University / Panel Chair: Faye Hammill, University of Strathclyde <br /> <br />Some of the most historically and theoretically provocative areas of modernist studies have recently occupied the interrelated areas of modernism, celebrity, and publicity, challenging the divide between the high culture of modernism (and the elite reputations of its figures) and the publicly mediated culture of celebrity (and the consumerist economy from which modernists claimed to rebel). Following the work of scholars such as Aaron Jaffe in MODERNISM AND THE CULTURE OF CELEBRITY (2005), Justus Nieland in FEELING MODERN (2008), and Jonathan Goldman in MODERNISM IS THE LITERATURE OF CELEBRITY (2011), this interdisciplinary panel seeks to explore further the idea of a 'modernist reputation' in aspects of art and literature, as well as media and popular culture. <br /> <br />Apropos of this year's conference theme, it will also devote special attention to the ways in which a quotidian or "vernacular" modernism affectively enables such reputations. As Miriam Hansen argues, modernism encompasses "a whole range of cultural and artistic practices that register, respond to, and reflect upon processes of modernization and the experience of modernity, including the paradigmatic transformation of the conditions under which art is produced, transmitted, and consumed." What do particular reputations signify in particular cultural moments and how do they change over time? What does it mean from an ideological perspective to have a reputation associated with modernist aesthetics? What are the discursive and art-historical currents from which these reputations flow through the modernist imaginary, particularly along a phenomenological horizon where modernity is worked through at the level of the senses? <br /> <br />Possible topics may include, but are not limited to the following: <br /> <br />- Media stardom, celebrity, and visibility <br />- Reputations across media forms <br />- Popular images: production, consumption, and circulation <br />- The machinery of reputation building: publicity, promotion, and criticism/commentary <br />- The role of the press <br />- The relationships between and among new technologies, publics, and reputations <br />- Reception contexts: readers, audiences, and fans <br />- Canonicity, taste cultures, and reading formations <br />- The identity politics of reputations <br />- Fame, glamour, and beauty <br />- Success stories <br />- Performance styles in music, theater, and/or cinema <br />- Renowned authorship <br />- Art world reputations <br />- Self-made reputations <br />- Global reputations <br />- Infamy and notoriety <br />- Forgotten figures and the undoing of reputations <br /> <br />Send 300 word abstract with 5 item bibliography and full academic CV (as separate e-mail attachments) to: Will Scheibel (willscheibel@gmail.com). <br /> <br />Please visit the MSA website for more details about the 2012 conference: http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa14/cfp.html

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, U. S. A.
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Will Scheibel

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Modernism and the Weather (MSA 14)


This panel invites papers that address the significance of the weather in modernist works (literature, film, visual art). How does the weather become a particularly modernist concern? What are the stakes of weather prediction, anticipated in the early part of the twentieth century? How are meteorological events forecast, observed, described, and interpreted? How might weather structure coordinates of knowledge and time? How does the weather negotiate the terrain of the ordinary and the spectacular? Submissions to this interdisciplinary panel might address (but are by no means limited to) the ways in which modernist works renegotiate the pathetic fallacy; the relationship between weather and affect; good weather and bad; the effects of weather; the instability of climate; the politics of weather and empire; the intersections of modernist studies and ecocriticism; the relationship of weather and medium. <br />Please send an abstract of 300 words to Louise Hornby (lhornby@humnet.ucla.edu) by April 1st, 2012. Include your name, paper title, institutional affiliation and position, contact information, and a 2-3 sentence scholarly bio. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, US
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Louise Hornby

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MSA XIV: Behind the Scenes Modernism


This MSA XIV panel examines modernist spectacle from the vantage point of the rehearsal room, the off-stage, the ticket booth, the prop closet. We propose to explore the modernist preoccupation with the practice, time, and material and affective labor that performance and spectatorship demand. The literary and filmic texts that interest us spotlight the scaffolding and expose the seams, showcasing the minor sensations and marginal bodies that spectacle more conventionally occludes. <br /> <br />Topics: <br />-revealed labor: exposed foundations, staging, clean-up; <br />-technicians, stage hands, prop makers, scene-painters, ticket-sellers; <br />-remainders of the show: stains, costumes, smudged make-up, debris, confetti; <br />-‘minor’ sensory play (smell, touch), rather than visual spectacle; <br />-contra-modernity, the out-of-synch, off-beat, counter-rhythms; <br />-belatedness, remainders, left-overs, waste products, the spoiled, the sour, crumbs; <br />-spatial edges, peripheries, out of the spotlight, in the wings, the lateral gaze; <br />-rehearsal, practice; <br />-marginal characters, back-ups, alternates; <br />-infelicitous performatives, misfired speech acts, the peri-performative; <br />-trying too hard, flubbing your lines, failed sophistication, embarrassment <br /> <br />Send 150 word abstracts and brief bio by April 1, to Hannah Freed-Thall, Princeton University (h.freedthall@gmail.com) and Sarah Ann Wells, University of Iowa (sarah-wells@uiowa.edu). <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Sarah Ann Wells

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Analogical Modernism (MSA 14)


Analogy has a long history as a figure of rhetoric and logic. In his 1951 essay, "Effects of Analogy," Wallace Stevens makes this figure central to poetics, writing, "Poetry is incredibly one of the effects of analogy." This term, in Steven's understanding, encompasses various procedures of saying the same thing another way such that the restatement illustrates and gives definition to the thing stated. Poetry is a kind of rhetoric in which "the feeling of one man is communicated to another in words of the exquisite appositeness that takes away all their verbality." <br /> <br />This panel invites papers (on poetry, novels, philosophy, visual arts) that consider the ways in which modernism mobilizes analogical resources (including simile, metaphor, and example), for instance, as a way of making available certain kinds of experiences (not least of which includes, as Stevens suggests, feeling). A key operation of analogy is the creation of images, through which emotion is communicated. How does the image function in modernist texts? How are emotions or feelings pictured? <br /> <br />Analogy can draw illuminating parallels between disparate phenomena, as well as imagine states of affairs that do not exist. Is there an ethical dimension to be located in analogy (broadly construed) as a means by which aesthetics stages possibility? What does it mean to think one thing <i>as</i> another? What is at at stake in the formulation "as if"? <br /> <br />Topics may include but are by no means limited to: <br /> <br />- The modernist recuperation of ancient rhetorical figures, such as the epic or Homeric simile <br />- Analogy as a term in logic <br />- The relation of logic to literature <br />- The epistemological uses of metaphors and models (as theorized, for instance, by Paul Ricoeur) <br />- Image-making in verbal arts and visual arts <br />- The logic of the exemplification and exemplarity <br />- Wittgenstein and seeing aspects <br /> <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 300 words as well as a brief scholarly bio by April 1, 2012 to dyzhang@princeton.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Dora Zhang

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MSA 14: Harlem Spectacles


In the chapter “Spectacles in Color” in his autobiography The Big Sea, Langston Hughes describes the famous Hamilton Club Lodge Ball as the “Strangest and gaudiest of all Harlem spectacles.” For Hughes, the ball where “men dress as women and women dress as men” is representative of Harlem life in the 1920’s. After positioning the drag ball within the broader context of Harlem life—including Countee Cullen’s wedding and the church services of Rev. Dr. Becton—Hughes comes to the conclusion that “Harlem likes spectacles of one kind or another.” <br />Recent scholarship has begun to examine the Harlem Renaissance in light of these types of spectacle. This focus on Harlem’s spectacular quality in the 1920’s has expanded previous understandings of the Harlem Renaissance, exploring it in terms of a dynamic interplay between various sexual and racial identities. Due to the unique spatiotemporal conditions of Harlem in the 1920’s as a site of migration for rural African Americans and a popular destination for whites escaping Prohibition, Harlem can be read as providing a space for interplay between various social groups, sexual identities, and ethnicities. Contemporary criticism reveals that the Harlem Renaissance’s artistic output is, in part, a product of these urban confluences. Moreover, this dynamic confrontation is apparent in the kinds of spectacles Harlem enjoys. Papers should expand upon this role of spectacle in Harlem’s historical, social, or artistic productions. <br />Please send abstract (250 words) to Matthew Hannah (mhannah@uoregon.edu) and include a brief bio. Deadline is April 1st. <br />Approaches could include: <br />-Queer Theory <br />-Narrative <br />-Historical <br />-Periodical Studies <br />-Cultural Studies <br />-Marxism <br />-Poetry/Poetics <br />-Race Theory <br />-Feminist Theory <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Matthew Hannah

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Some Things Fishy: Representing the Non-Mammalian Animal in Modernism


We are looking for one or two more speakers for the panel listed below! Please contact us at either c.setz@english.bbk.ac.uk (Cathryn Setz) or lacivita@tcd.ie (Alison Lacivita) with an abstract (250) and a short bio by 1 April! <br /> <br /> <br />Some Things Fishy: Representing the Non-Mammalian Animal in Modernism <br /> <br />This panel addresses the issue of anthropomorphization of non-human animals in Modernist literature. There are several instances in canonical Modernist texts wherein the writer reveals an anxiety over the inability to accurately represent a being so radically separate from the human consciousness. From Leopold Bloom's attempt to get inside the head of his cat and the pigeons over the River Liffey to T.S. Eliot's Book of Practical Cats and Virginia Woolf's Flush, several literary works of the early decades of the 20th century explore the issue of narratologically representing the animal. Constantly changing definitions and categories of what constitutes "the animal" during this period of course play an important role in the relationship between the animal and the question of its linguistic production. <br /> <br />Scholarship has addressed the space of the animal in modernity in terms of urban change, the ethics of non-human agency in history, and the ways in which theorizations of the animal are at the heart of much post-structural theory, and as such a product of modernism. But what this panel aims to address is in fact the spectacle of the animal in language as a currency of modernist literature. As metaphors pitched furthest from the human—the speaking animal—what does the spectacularization of the non-human offer writers of this period? What and how is the non-human pushed into the center of the human subject? <br /> <br /> <br />Speakers: <br /> <br />Alison Lacivita (Trinity College Dublin) – “D.H. Lawrence in a Half-Shell: The Tortoise poems of Birds, Beasts and Flowers" <br /> <br />Cathryn Setz (Birkbeck, University of London) — “This patient insect body”: non-mammalian animals and late modernist aesthetics, from Eluard to Ernst <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Alison Lacivita

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Voice and Modernist Spectacle (MSA 14)


CFP: Proposed panel on Voice and Modernist Spectacle <br />MSA 14, Las Vegas (Oct. 18–€“21, 2012) <br /> <br />Visuality and visibility are central to definitions of spectacle; however, spectacles are rarely silent or voiceless. This panel will consider modernist spectacles wherein voice plays a primary or significant role, whether in concert with or separate from the visual and other senses. <br /> <br />Possible topics might include, but aren't limited to: <br /> <br />—Modern sound technologies and technologized voice. <br />—The modernist sensorium; modernism or modernity and the senses. <br />—Embodied and/or disembodied voice in film or theater. <br />—Voice and political spectacle. <br />—€”Spectacles of failure: faltering or weakened voice, "€œchoking,"€ blundering. <br /> <br />If interested, please send a 250-word abstract and a brief (2-3 sentences) scholarly bio by April 1, 2012 to Sara Bryant at slb4ca@virginia.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, U.S.
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Sara Bryant

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Modernism and the Forms of Totality


Modernism and the Forms of Totality (MSA 14) <br /> <br />Major theories of modernism from Lukacs to Jameson have read modernism as a rejection of totality, even as numerous novels and poems of the period are defined by their encyclopedic, totalizing impulses. This panel seeks to conceptualize that tension through a focus on the influence of more small-scale and popular encyclopedic forms and genres on the aesthetics and aims of the modern novel: travel guidebooks, censuses, phone books and street directories, dictionaries, etc. How do modern novels both mirror and subvert the functions and structures of these emerging textual forms? How do these genres intervene in how writers represent geographic space and human bodies, and how do they serve to map the relationship between England and Europe and its colonial possessions? Any approaches to these questions are welcomed. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of 300 words, as well as a brief bio, to Jesse Schotter (jesse.schotter@gmail.com) by April 1st.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, US
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Jesse Schotter

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Modernism and the Essence of Technology (MSA 14)


Heidegger’s famous essay “The Question Concerning Technology” begins with the claim that “technology is not equivalent to the essence of technology.” In his terms, the essence of technology precedes any particular, historical, concrete manifestation of technology, any particular device and constitutes the “technologicalness” that pervades every particular piece of technology. In order for people not to be “unfree and chained to technology,” he argues, we must consider technology’s essence, rather than only pursuing or evading, loving or hating particular developments in the endless stream of new devices. <br /> <br />This proposed panel seeks to examine how modernism and modernists understood what Heidegger calls the essence of technology. How did modernist writers define technology as a category? For these writers, what “technologicalness” tied together technologies in all of their various concrete manifestations? How did their understanding of technology’s essence differ from and dovetail with that of other philosophers of technology, both contemporary to the modernists (Heidegger, but also Mumford, Benjamin, McLuhan, Marcuse, etc.) and to us (Stiegler, Siegert, Kittler, etc.)? How did writers’ understanding of the essence of technology affect or shape their definitions of art or the literary? What role might spectacle play in modernism’s philosophies of technology? <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstract and brief bio to Heather Fielding (hfieldin@pnc.edu) by March 30. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2012

For more information, contact: Heather Fielding

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Women Modernists and Right-Wing/Reactionary Politics


For at least two decades, scholars have addressed the striking convergence between modernist writers and reactionary, right-wing, or fascist regimes. From Andrew Hewitt's Fascist Modernism and Fredric Jameson's Wyndham Lewis: the Modernist as Fascist to Leon Surette's just-published Dreams of a Totalitarian Utopia: Literary Modernism and Politics, critics have sought to determine why so many modernist innovators were drawn to right-wing or reactionary politics. Yet the discussion has still largely been confined to the political leanings of male modernists, adverting to a fairly standard set of usual suspects: Eliot, Yeats, Pound, Lewis, Marinetti. This panel seeks to bring gender more squarely into this discussion, asking whether (or if) female modernists shared tendencies similar to their right-wing or reactionary male counterparts. Were female modernists equally drawn to reactionary or right-wing political regimes? If so, how did gender inflect the nature of their attraction? We encourage papers that tease out the complexities of this historical moment and the specific possibilities of right-wing or reactionary thought available to early twentieth-century female modernists (authoritarianism, National Socialism, Fascism, Maurrasianism, Royalism, Communism,etc.). Prospective panelists should send a 500-word abstract and a short (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography to Annalisa Zox-Weaver (annalisazoxweaver@gmail.com) and Barbara Will (barbara.will@dartmouth.edu) by March 30, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2012

For more information, contact: Annalisa Zox-Weaver

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Modernist Spectacles of Destruction


Much of modernist art and writing features or reflects on images of destruction, those of war and mass violence being primary among these. As advances in film, radio, and photography made it possible to bring representations of violence home to viewers, listeners, and readers, questions of the ethical use of these spectacles as aesthetic commodities arose, and these dilemmas were often foregrounded in modernist work/art. We seek a third panelist for a panel focused on the ethics and aesthetics of modernist depictions of destruction, whether written or visual, poetic, narrative, musical, or performative. Please send 300 word abstracts to Mark Hussey (mhussey@pace.edu) and Brenda Helt (helt0010@umn.edu) by March 26th.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 26, 2012

For more information, contact: Mark Hussey and Brenda Helt

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The Spectacle of Modern Sport (MSA14)


In keeping with the MSA14 conference theme, this panel invites papers that address the spectacle of modern sport in historical, literary, and/or sociological terms. Possible topics might include the architecture of mass sport, the celebrity of the athlete, the emergence of national and transnational bureaucracies of sport (e.g., the International Olympic Committee, the International Tennis Federation, the Professional Golfers' Association, etc.), the relationship between sports and nationalism (e.g., the Gaelic Athletic Association, the 1934 FIFA World Cup, the 1936 Berlin Olympics, etc.), and the quantification of modern sports in terms of records and statistics, as well as literary and filmic representations of sport (e.g., Ernest Hemingway, Ring Lardner, Leni Riefenstahl, etc.). Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Alexander McKee at abmckee@udel.edu by March 26, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 26, 2012

For more information, contact: Alexander McKee

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Poetics + Ethics


Robert Volpicelli/ Penn State University <br /> <br />contact email: <br />rav140@psu.edu <br /> <br />In his 1913 essay, "The Serious Artist," Ezra Pound (perhaps ironically, considering his career trajectory) suggests that writing "good" poetry is as much a matter of aesthetics as it is ethics. The last few years have seen an increased amount of scholarship pertaining to the ethics of modernism. The majority of these critical inquiries, however, have centered on fiction in general and novels in particular. What if we took Pound's claim seriously as a way of shifting the attention of this conversation away from plot and toward poetics? What would an ethical poetry look like? How might poetic form be implicated in philosophical considerations of ethics? Is there a mode of poetry worth condemning, ethically speaking? This panel is accepting abstract submissions that entertain these questions and any others that engage the relationship between poetics and ethics. Submissions on any modernist poet, school of poetry, or poetry-related practice will gladly be considered. <br /> <br />Please submit a 300 word abstract and a C.V. (as separate documents) to Bob Volpicelli at rav140@psu.edu. The deadline for submissions will be March 25th. <br /> <br />More information on the conference can be found at the MSA's website: http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/index.html <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, U.S.A.
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 25, 2012

For more information, contact: Bob Volpicelli

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Appropriation, Plagiarism, Theft (MSA 2012)


<br />From The Waste Land and The Cantos, to Duchamp’s readymades and Benjamin’s Arcades, to Sherrie Levine’s photography, to sampling in hip hop, much of twentieth century art is characterized by a willingness to borrow or steal the materials of others. Why does this matter? <br /> <br />Please send a brief CV and an abstract or completed paper. Papers addressing arts other than literature are especially welcome. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 25, 2012

For more information, contact: Bill Freind

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Modernist Necrophilia (MSA14)


Modernist Necrophilia <br /> <br />This panel will consider modernist responses to the intersections among death, intimacy, and erotic life. The following topics would be welcome, but potential contributors are certainly not limited to this list: <br /> <br />+ modernist gothic <br />+ the uncanny <br />+ spiritualism <br />+ fiction, poetry, art dealing with the death of a beloved <br />+ representations of corpses, ghosts, etc. in film, art, dance <br />+ generic considerations: memoir, elegy, etc. <br />+ approaches: psychoanalytic, feminist, queer, trauma studies, affect/emotion studies, narrative theory <br /> <br />300-word abstracts and CVs should be sent by email to Janine Utell at jmutell@widener.edu no later than March 25, 2012.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, NV, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 25, 2012

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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Modernism and the Circus


MSA14 “Modernism and Spectacle” <br />October 18-20, 2012 Las Vegas <br />http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa14/cfp.html <br /> <br />“Modernism and the Circus” <br />In keeping with the MSA 14 theme, this is a CFP for a panel on the significance of the circus to modernism. The circus has become almost synonymous with empty spectacle, disorganized activity, sensational distortions of human and animal form and popular amusement. At the same time the transport and organization required for moving a circus from town to town also seems to exemplify modernity’s capacities for rationalization and its penetration of provincial regionalisms. The massive 3-ring American form emerged roughly in the late 1880s and peaked in the mid-1920s. In England and Europe, the development of the modern circus emerged from smaller and different traditions around the same time. The circus is referenced across the modernist arts, but to what end? How is the form or content of the circus spectacle part of modernism’s modernity? Issues might include but are not limited to: <br />-the combination of modern performance technologies with older arts from vaudeville or music hall <br />-the combination of abstraction and specificity in the circus <br />-artificiality and performance; “freaks” and fake science <br />-“high” and “low” culture <br />-the circus in modernist visual arts and literatures <br />-circus in relation to rise of cinema <br />-animal and human forms and behaviors <br />-construction of the ethnic, racial and colonial <br /> <br />Please send *detailed* proposals with contact information by March 20, 2012 to pchu@albany.edu <br />Patricia E. Chu <br />University at Albany-SUNY <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 20, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 20, 2012

For more information, contact: Patricia E. Chu

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Modernism and Cosmopolitanism (MSA 14)


CFP: Modernism and Cosmopolitanism (MSA 14; Oct. 18–21, 2012) <br /> <br />The past few years have witnessed a revival of interest in cosmopolitanism as scholars in a variety of disciplines seek new ways to define community in an increasingly interdependent world. Cosmopolitanism once represented an ethical and political ideal that championed a commitment to humankind as a whole and devalued local attachments. Now “new” or “counter” cosmopolitanisms have emerged; challenging the implications of traditional cosmopolitanism (ethnocentrism, imperialism, elitism), this new generation locates cosmopolitanism within the realities of a globally integrated world that recognizes and values local attachments. <br /> <br />A handful of studies have already applied this new cosmopolitanism to modernism and, in so doing, have reconceived the spatial and temporal boundaries of modernism. This panel seeks submissions that extend or contest previous studies as well as submissions that explore the heretofore unexamined convergences between new cosmopolitanism theory and modernist practices. <br /> <br />Some potential questions include (but are by no means limited to) the following: <br /> <br />* Can cosmopolitan “style” be located beyond the English novel? <br />* Does cosmopolitanism, as manifested in ways of reading and writing as well as in modes of being, represent anticolonial critique or neocolonial practice? <br />* Do modernist artists anticipate contemporary forms of transnational belonging? <br />* How do they negotiate the inherent contradictions of new cosmopolitanisms, be it “rooted,” “discrepant,” or “vernacular” cosmopolitanism? <br />* How much does a cosmopolitanism outlook depend on travel, migration, exile, and displacement? <br />* How do works of modernism represent the interplay between forces of nationalism and cosmopolitan visions? <br />* In what ways do modernist texts articulate cosmopolitan memory and what are the implications of cosmopolitan memory on conceptions of culture and identity? <br /> <br />If interested, please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Michael Spiegel (spiegel@virginia.edu) by March 19. <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 19, 2012

For more information, contact: Michael Spiegel

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From Weimar to Los Angeles: Modernism in Literature and Film (MSA 14)


CFP: From Weimar to Los Angeles: Modernism in Literature and Film <br />MSA 14, Las Vegas (Oct. 18-21, 2012) <br /> <br />This panel will focus on the relationships between late modernism (both pre- and post-WWII) and film. We welcome submissions on any topic in this area; however, we are especially interested in discussions on the city, the flâneur, spectacle, the avant-garde, and Situationism, or papers that explore questions of influence, anxieties about representation, formal strategies, and politics.  <br /> <br />Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief (2-3 lines) biographical statement to both Tara Thomson (tst@uvic.ca) and Angus McFadzean (gusmcf@yahoo.co.uk) by Thursday, March 15.

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2012

For more information, contact: Tara Thomson

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The Spectacular Ordinary


This panel seeks submissions for papers addressing the particular focus on spectacularizing the ordinary, in certain types of literature during the late 1800s/early 1900s. <br /> <br />New scholarship on notions of the ordinary, and its relationship to the spectacle will be especially considered. While the main focus of the panel is set to be on literary works, other types of art or forms of inquest will also be welcome. <br /> <br />Short abstracts and bios to mlundell@ucsd.edu by March 11-ish. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 11, 2012

For more information, contact: Michael Lundell

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&quot;The Spectacular Modern Woman&quot;


CFP: "The Spectacular Modern Woman" <br /> <br />In keeping with this year's conference theme, modernism and spectacle, we are proposing a panel (or roundtable) discussion of Liz Conor's highly stimulating book, The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s (2004). Arguing that "it was specifically through visual images—spectacles—that women could appear modern to themselves and others, Conor coins the useful phrase 'techniques of appearing' to describe the phenomenon in which women self-consciously constructed themselves as visual spectacles.” Jane Garrity, whose review of the book we quote here, will chair the panel, and Liz Conor will present a response to the papers. We welcome any approach taken to Conor's book—theoretical, historical, transnational, pedagogical. We're not looking for a love fest but a sustained engagement with the book's arguments, insights, and approach. <br /> <br />Abstracts (app. 500 words) should be sent to Pamela Caughie (pcaughi@luc.edu) by March 1, 2012. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Las Vegas, US
Conference Starts: October 18, 2012
Conference Ends: October 21, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2012

For more information, contact: Pamela Caughie

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Generation M: Resetting Modernist Time


CALL FOR PAPERS <br />Generation M: Resetting Modernist Time <br />11-12 May 2012 <br />Amsterdam <br /> <br />Keynotes: <br />Chris Baldick (Goldsmiths College, London) <br />Siegfried Zielinski (Universität der Künste, Berlin) <br /> <br />Are Modernists aware of themselves as Modernists? Certainly, there is consciousness of shared enterprise – taking part in a “grrrreat littttterary period,” as one of Pound's memorable eruptions has it. Yet, even before period or style, comes the inevitable frame of shared generation. Before the “simultaneous order” of “the whole of literature of Europe from Homer,” as Eliot has it, the talented author must feel “his own generation in his bones.” The concept of generation – in the bones, beneath the skin, consumed and digested – serves to provide modernism with a vital undercarriage drawn from the human lifespan that continues to shape not least our own scholarly conceptions of “the movement,” and hence merits detailed examination.  <br /> <br />To this end, our international two-day conference to be held at the University of Amsterdam is concerned with exploring, firstly, how exactly and why the generational note is struck by the writers and artists it helps to identify. Secondly and in contrast to recent trends away from Modernism as a qualitatively distinct cultural mode, we are interested in how the concept of “generation” can either help or hinder Modernist Studies. Thus we welcome not only case studies of individual texts or artifacts that deal with Modernism in generational terms, but also theoretical papers concerned with the role of generational (periodizing, temporal) thinking in modernist studies and historiography. We’re interested in both big and small M modernism - that is the brand "Modernism" and the expanded version "modernity" in all its interdisciplinary, transnational, critical dimensions. We thus hope to bridge generation with periodicity and time as well as elicit the attention of those working in the fields of philosophy and critical theory. <br /> <br />As outcomes of the conference we envisage the establishment of an international transatlantic network called “Generation M” and the publication of selected contributions. While our thematic focus is obviously very much on the modernist period (including its periodization and time theories), we still also aim to link up, wherever possible, with already existing collaborations on the generation topic more broadly. In practical terms, the mini-conference format will be designed, above all, to foster in-depth critical dialogue and open, collaborative discussion. This means there will be no parallel sessions and presentation times will be 15-20 minutes with plenty of time for exchanges between presenters and attendees. To facilitate this interaction, we will ask participants for updated abstracts and handouts for pre-conference circulation a few weeks before the event. <br /> <br />Proposal deadline: extended to January 20, 2012 <br />Please submit proposals to genm2012@gmail.com <br />The committee will notify those selected by February 3, 2012 <br /> <br />Organizers: Rudolph Glitz (U of Amsterdam), Lois Cucullu (U of Minnesota), and Aaron Jaffe (U of Louisville) <br />

Conference Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference Starts: May 11, 2012
Conference Ends: May 12, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: January 20, 2012

For more information, contact: Lois Cucullu

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T.S. Eliot at the American Literature Association


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2012 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 24–27, at the Hyatt Regency in San Francisco. Please send proposals (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 16, 2012. <br /> <br />For information on the ALA and its 2012 meeting, please see the ALA website at http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/ala2. For information on the Eliot Society, please visit us at http://www.luc.edu/eliot. <br />

Conference Location: San Francisco, USA
Conference Starts: May 24, 2012
Conference Ends: May 27, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: January 16, 2012

For more information, contact: Nancy K. Gish

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Essays on Teaching the Popular


Essay contributions are sought for a volume entitled Teaching Tainted Lit: Popular American Fiction and the Perils and Pleasures of the Classroom, to be edited by Janet G. Casey. Taking as its premise the idea that popular fiction has secured a solid position in higher education classrooms, this collection seeks to explore its pedagogical implications. Possible topics may include: unusual or insightful uses of the popular in the context of college English; historical or contemporary struggles over the teaching of popular texts; the politics and intersections of popularity and canonicity as they pertain to the classroom; anxieties and pleasures (on the parts of students and/or teachers) located in reading the popular; differences in attitudes about studying historical and contemporary popular texts; relations between teaching the popular and the perceived crisis in the humanities; teaching the American popular outside the U.S.; issues of publication and dissemination that affect teaching (e.g., working with magazines; problems associated with out-of-print materials). Essays that focus on a particular text and its pedagogical ramifications are also welcome, especially if they put broader questions into play. Personal/anecdotal postures invited. Please send a 300-word abstract and cv to jcasey@skidmore.edu by 15 Jan. 2012. Invited essays will be due in late 2012. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Saratoga Springs NY, USA
Conference Starts: September 21, 2011
Conference Ends: January 15, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2012

For more information, contact: Janet Casey

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H.D. at the American Literature Association


The H.D. International Society invites papers to be delivered in a panel at the American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, May 24-27, 2012. Presentations on any topic are welcome, and we look forward to showcasing new research on H.D. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250-500 words by January 13 to Annette Debo (adebo@wcu.edu) and Lara Vetter (LVetter@uncc.edu). <br /> <br />Annette Debo <br />Co-Chair of the H.D. International Society & <br /> Associate Professor, Department of English <br />Western Carolina University <br /> <br />Lara Vetter <br />Co-Chair of the H.D. International Society & <br /> Associate Professor, Department of English <br />University of North Carolina at Charlotte <br />

Conference Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Conference Starts: May 24, 2012
Conference Ends: May 27, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: January 13, 2012

For more information, contact: Annette Debo

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