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Evelyn Waugh Undergraduate Essay Contest


Evelyn Waugh Undergraduate Essay Contest <br />Sponsored by Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies <br /> <br />Subject: any aspect of the life or work of Evelyn Waugh <br /> <br />Prize: $250 <br />Limit: normally 20 pages or 5000 words <br />Judged by Editorial Board <br /> <br />Deadline: 31 December 2011 <br /> <br />Submit to <br />Dr. John H. Wilson <br />Department of English <br />Lock Haven University <br />Lock Haven, PA 17745 (USA) <br />jwilson3@lhup.edu <br /> <br />“There will be a prize of half a crown for the longest essay, irrespective of any possible merit.” --Decline and Fall (1928) <br />

Conference Location: N/A, N/A
Conference Starts: December 31, 2011
Conference Ends: December 31, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: December 31, 2011

For more information, contact: Patrick Query

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Material Meanings (EAM)


<br />Material Meanings <br /> <br />Third Biannual Conference of the European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies (EAM) <br /> <br />7-9 September 2012 <br /> <br />University of Kent, Canterbury, England <br /> <br />http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/materialmeanings/ <br /> <br />This conference investigates the avant-garde's reconfiguration of matter and materials in the quest to generate new meanings and effects. <br /> <br />Its particular focus will be the manner in which different artistic disciplines adopt strategies, theories and techniques from each other, and how they translate, transform and integrate conceptions and modes of expression from other sign systems. <br /> <br />Proposals are invited for contributions which deal with any of the following: the interference or conflict of artistic disciplines; the interaction of disciplines in artistic movements; the combination of media in single artworks or artistic practices; the treatment of sign as matter and matter as sign; the materiality of art and the art of materiality; art and material environment; the world as matter and meaning; text as thing, things as texts; the transfiguration of traditional or found materials; the material effectivity of the avant-garde; the interdependency of manifestos (meaning) and art (material); technology and the transformation of meaning; the incorporation of the foreign or extraneous. <br /> <br />We welcome contributions across all areas of avant-garde activity: art, literature, music, architecture, film, artistic and social movements, lifestyle, television, fashion, drama, performance, activism, design and technology. We especially welcome contributions which explore the combination of different media or practices within a single work or within a given environment. <br /> <br />The conference languages are English, French and German. <br /> <br />Proposals are welcome from individuals, and from panels of three or four, or exceptionally double panels of six or seven. We especially welcome panel proposals. We will prefer panels where members are drawn from different institutions, preferably across different disciplines, and especially across national boundaries. <br /> <br />Panel proposals should include the following information. Panels must not consist only of graduate students. <br /> <br />1. Title of panel and language of panel (English, French, German – one only) <br />2. Name, address and email contact of Panel Chair <br />3. A summary of the panel topic (300 words) <br />4. A summary of each individual contribution (300 words) <br />5. Name, address and email contact of individual contributors <br />6. Short biography of individual contributors <br /> <br />Individual proposals should include the following information. <br /> <br />1. Title of paper and language of paper (English, French, German) <br />2. Name, address and email of contributor <br />3. A summary of the contribution (300 words) <br />4. Short biography of the contributor <br /> <br />There will also be research seminars for current graduate students conducted in English. Each seminar is for up to 12 graduate students and is led by an experienced professor. There are no auditors. Work is circulated by email before the conference and is not read aloud. There is a discussion of the work and an opportunity to develop ideas in a peer-group context. The available seminars will be listed at the website. If you are a current graduate student and you wish to participate in one of these seminars please submit the following information: <br /> <br />1 Preferred seminar group <br />2 Title of contribution (English only) <br />3 A summary of the contribution (300 words) <br />4 Name, address, and email of contributor <br />5 Short biography of the contributor <br /> <br />Please submit proposals to the conference email address eam2012@kent.ac.uk by 16 December 2011. <br /> <br />Please DO NOT submit proposals in more than one category. <br />

Conference Location: Canterbury, UK
Conference Starts: September 07, 2012
Conference Ends: September 09, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: December 16, 2011

For more information, contact: David Ayers

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Poetry &amp; Psychoanalysis


Poetry & Psychoanalysis <br />an international colloquium at Oxford University <br />30 June- 1 July 2012 <br /> <br />Keynote speaker: Adam Phillips <br />Website: www.poetryandpsychoanalysis.org <br /> <br />Just as psychoanalysts have mined poetry for examples and case studies, the insights and the problems of psychoanalysis have been a rich source of inspiration for twentieth and twenty-first century poets. Psychoanalytic readings of poetry from Romanticism to the present have moved beyond symbol-hunting and biographical decoding: recent scholarship has explored a wide range of psychoanalytically-informed reading practices and models of subjectivity. In what ways do these two discourses continue to speak to one another? What preoccupations do they share? What frictions result from their conversation? <br /> In what ways can psychoanalysis inform discussions about the lyric "I"? <br /> How well suited is psychoanalysis -- a discourse associated with depth -- to analysing the surface play of poetics? <br /> How do recent feminist and queer perspectives converge with psychoanalytic readings of poetry? <br /> To what extent can accounts of the relation between the psychoanalytic and the political address questions of poetry's relation to history? <br /> How do psychoanalytic paradigms of repetition speak to the musical and formal repetitions of verse? <br /> What do poetry's generic characteristics -- and poetry criticism's distinctive preoccupations -- offer to the broader intersection of psychoanalysis and literature? What might they suggest about that intersection's limits? <br /> <br />We welcome papers from scholars working with all psychoanalytic paradigms (Freudian, Lacanian, Object Relations, and others) and thinkers (Freud, Lacan, Winnicott, Klein, Bion, Bollas, Kristeva, Benjamin, etc.) in relation to poetry. Topics might include: body and speech; apostrophe, address, dialogue; confession; private and public; language and affect; repetition, temporality, and lyric time; trauma and mourning; play and creativity. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words and a one-to-three-sentence biographical statement by 15 December, 2011, to Reena Sastri (reena.sastri@ell.ox.ac.uk) and Julie Taylor (julie.taylor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Conference Location: Oxford, UK
Conference Starts: June 30, 2012
Conference Ends: July 01, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: December 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Reena Sastri

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Re-Visiting Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978)


Re-Visiting Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978) <br /> <br />A One-Day International Symposium hosted by the Centre for South West Writing, University of Exeter and the Dorset County Museum <br /> <br />29 June 2012 <br />Dorset County Museum, Dorchester <br /> <br />Keynote Speakers <br />Professor Mary Joannou (Anglia Ruskin University) <br />Professor Jan Montefiore (University of Kent) <br /> <br /> <br />Sylvia Townsend Warner’s writing demands renewed investigation. An expert musicologist as well as a versatile novelist, short story writer and poet, she was a controversial international figure. MI5 investigated her ‘communist activities’ while contemporaries were unsettled by her Spanish Civil War politics and the unreserved expression of her homosexuality, with these aspects of her writing having attracted some of the liveliest critical commentary by distinguished biographers, critics and novelists. Her novels, short stories, poems, letters, diaries and translations have been reprinted by publishers including the Women’s Press, Virago, Penguin, Carcanet and her own publisher Chatto. Yet despite attempts to recover Warner’s work for a wider readership, she is rarely found on university syllabi in the UK or abroad. <br /> <br />This one-day international symposium hosted jointly by the University of Exeter’s Centre for South West Writing (http://centres.exeter.ac.uk/southwestwriting/) and the Dorset County Museum (http://www.dorsetcountymuseum.org/) aims to mark the importance of Warner’s writing and highlight her place as an original, generically resourceful and politically conscious 1930s woman writer at the heart of the literary avant-garde. The conference also aims to draw attention to the rich resources of the Sylvia Townsend Warner Archive (http://www.sylviatownsendwarner.com/) housed in the Museum <br /> <br />The conference organisers welcome submission of papers from postgraduate students and established scholars on any aspect of STW’s work. <br /> <br />Topics can include but are not restricted to: <br /> <br />- STW and place (especially Dorset) <br />- STW and radical politics <br />- STW and life writing <br />- STW and music <br />- STW and other modernist writers <br />- STW and the arts <br />- STW abroad <br />- STW and sexual identity <br />- STW and translation <br /> <br /> <br />Please send 300 word abstracts, accompanied by short CV, to Dr Alex Murray and Dr Vike Martina Plock (stwconference2012@exeter.ac.uk) by 1 December 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Dorchester, United KIngdom
Conference Starts: June 29, 2012
Conference Ends: June 29, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: December 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Alex Murray

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Modernism &amp; the Folk: Beyond Primitivism Graduate Student Conference


The Rutgers University Modernist Studies Group and the Americanist Colloquium announce "Modernism and the Folk: Beyond Primitivism,"€ a transatlantic and interdisciplinary graduate student conference. This day-long event will take place at Rutgers--New Brunswick on March 23, 2012. Christopher Reed, Professor of English and Visual Studies at Penn State, will deliver the keynote lecture, "Bachelor Japanists." <br /> <br />We invite papers from across disciplines that examine the intersection of literary and artistic modernism and the seemingly opposed discourse of the folk. As modernism is increasingly subdivided into "many modernisms,"€ is a similar subdivision happening with its folk or primitivist offshoots? How does a changing definition of modernism or an expanded canon alter our definition of such categories as the folk, the "primitive,"€ and the avant-garde? How does it alter or expand our view of modernism and its others? <br /> <br />While we envision the conference as centering on the early twentieth century, we welcome proposals that challenge or expand the temporal boundaries of modernism. We also welcome papers that consider work written in languages other than English. <br /> <br />Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />The folk/avant-garde dialectic in literature, art, performance, and music <br />Primtivism in its relationship to colonialism and imperialism <br />Primitivism in an American context <br />Theories of creole degeneracy and the €œ"New World primitive" <br />"Inner primitivism"€ and the "thin veneer"€ of civilization <br />The power or potential of the folk <br />The folk and the modernist project of renewal or revitalization <br />The circulation of images, books, periodicals, films, radio <br />The postcolonial critique of "€œprimitivist" appropriation and problems with this critique <br />The relationship between animism, vitalism, and "the new materialism" <br />Fascism and the folk <br />Ethnography, auto-ethnography, counter-ethnography <br />Folklore and alternative histories <br />The history of anthropology and folklore studies <br />Please submit a 250-word abstract to modernistfolk@gmail.com by Wednesday, November 30. <br /> <br />Sponsored by the Rutgers Modernism and Globalization Seminar Series, the Rutgers Graduate Student Association, the Rutgers Americanist Colloquium and the Rutgers Modernist Studies Group.

Conference Location: New Brunswick, USA
Conference Starts: March 23, 2012
Conference Ends: March 23, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: November 30, 2011

For more information, contact: Mark DiGiacomo

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T.S. Eliot and Italy


Call for Papers: <br /> T.S. Eliot and the Heritage of Rome and Italy in Modernist Literature <br />An International Symposium <br />Florence, Italy <br />February 4th – 11th 2012 <br /> <br />The symposium topic deals with one of the most interesting aspects of Eliot’s exceptionally complex and erudite poetry, and that is the deep impact that the literature and culture of Rome and Italy had on his work and on Modernist Literature in general. <br /> <br />Hence the symposium topic is focused on, but not limited to, T.S. Eliot and his work. In fact, it encompasses the whole complexity of the Ancient Roman and Italian cultural influence on the most important literary movement of the 20th century Europe and America. <br /> <br />All proposals on the impact of Rome and Italy on English Language Modernist Literature regardless of their immediate connection to T. S. Eliot will be considered relevant to the topic of the conference and will be accepted for consideration by the co-organizers. <br /> <br />Participants are expected to make presentations of approximately 15 or 20 minutes duration to allow time for discussion and interaction. Participants will be invited to attend all the sessions and to participate in cultural events related to the symposium. <br /> <br />Participants should be scholars or critics of literature and/or other arts. Attendance of younger researchers is encouraged. The symposium will take place under the sponsorship of the Romualdo Del Bianco Foundation (http://www.fondazione-delbianco.org), and the number of participants is restricted to 50. <br /> <br />For the Symposium website please click here: http://www.fondazione-delbianco.org/seminari/progetti_prof/progview_PL.asp?start=1&idprog=347 <br /> <br />Proposals of 100 to 250 words or completed papers may be sent by regular mail or as email attachments to any of the co-organizers: <br /> <br />&#9644; Professor Temur Kobakhidze, School of Humanities, Caucasus University, 77 Kostava Street, Tbilisi 0175, Republic of Georgia. (email: tk282@cam.ac.uk) <br />&#9644; Dr. Patrick Query, U.S. Military Academy - West Point, NY - U.S.A. (email: Patrick.Query@usma.edu) <br /> &#9644; Dr. Stefano Maria Casella, Libera Università di Lingue e Comunicazione IULM - <br /> Milan – Italy (email: stefanomaria.casella@alice.it). <br /> <br />Participants will experience the pleasures of intellectual exchange in the environs of Florence, staying at a three-star hotel and enjoying daily excursions and activities, as well as free time to explore the city. DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: NOVEMBER 20, 2011 <br />

Conference Location: Florence, Italy
Conference Starts: February 04, 2012
Conference Ends: February 11, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: November 20, 2011

For more information, contact: Patrick Query

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Desiring Statues: Statuary, Sexuality and History Conference


Desiring Statues: Statuary, Sexuality and History Conference <br /> <br />Keynote Speakers <br /> <br />Dr Stefano-Maria Evangelista (University of Oxford) <br />Dr Ian Jenkins (British Museum) <br /> <br />Statuary has offered a privileged site for the articulation of sexual experience and ideas, and the formation of sexual knowledge. From prehistoric phallic stones, mythological representations of statues and sculptors, e.g. Medusa or Pygmalion, to the Romantic aesthetics and erotics of statuary and the recurrent references to sculpture in nineteenth- and twentieth-century sexology and other new debates on sexuality, the discourse of the statue intersects with constructions of gender, sex and sexuality in multiple ways. <br /> <br />As historical objects, statues give insight into changing perceptions of the sexed body and its representation; they tell stories of ownership and appropriation of sexualities across diverse cultural locations and historical moments. As an imaginary site, statues can serve to trouble the distinction between subject and object, reality and unreality, presence and absence, and present and past, thereby offering rich possibilities for thinking about the relation between individual and communal identities,sexuality and the past. <br /> <br />This interdisciplinary conference seeks to investigate how statues facilitate this interplay of sexuality and history. It explores the numerous different ways in which statues - as historical and/or imagined artefacts - allow us to think about the past and its relation to sex, gender and sexuality. <br /> <br />The conference brings together contributors from a wide variety of disciplines, including history, gender and sexuality studies, literary and cultural studies, art history, classics, archaeology and philosophy. <br />Contributions from postgraduate research students are very welcome. <br /> <br />Papers should explore how statuary intersects with questions of sexuality and gender, and temporality, specifically history. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />- Uses of Statuary in Sexual Science <br />- Statues in Colonial and Postcolonial Contexts <br />- Representations of Statues and Sculptors (in Literature, Visual <br />Arts, New Media) <br />- Sculptures and the Construction of Gender, Racial and National Identity <br />- Use of Statuary in Sexual Reform Movements <br />- Psychoanalytic Uses of Statuary <br />- Statues, Gender and Sexuality in Myths, Legends and Their Adaptations <br />- Sculpture and Figurations of Desire <br />- Statuary Representations of the Gendered Body <br />- Reception Histories of Individual Statues <br /> <br />The conference is organised by Dr Jana Funke (j.funke@exeter.ac.uk) and Jennifer Grove (jeg208@exeter.ac.uk) as part of the interdisciplinary Sexual History, Sexual Knowledge project, funded by the Wellcome Trust, and led by Drs Kate Fisher and Rebecca Langlands. <br /> <br />Please send 300-500 words abstracts to j.funke@exeter.ac.uk and <br />jeg208@exeter.ac.uk. The deadline for abstract submissions is 1st October 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Exeter, UK
Conference Starts: April 27, 2012
Conference Ends: April 27, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: October 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Jana Funke

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Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity


Call for Papers: Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity <br /> <br />Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) <br />March 15-18, 2012-Rochester, New York <br /> <br />For better and for worse, modernity has surely left its mark on the food we daily eat. Two hundred years ago in 1812, Bryan Donkin purchased from a London broker the patent for canning food items inside tin containers. Within the next decade canned goods were widespread in Britain and France (Robertson 123). One hundred and fifty years ago in the spring of 1862, Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard's experiments with heating liquids eventually led to pasteurized drinks--first wine and beer and then, later, milk (Greene, Guzel-Seydim, and Seydim 88). <br /> <br />This panel explores how literature has addressed the last two hundred years of rapidly modernizing food--a path involving hybridization, preservation, pasteurization, synthesizing, and genetic manipulation. If Brillat-Savarin's aphorism is still telling today ("Tell me what you eat, and I shall tell you what you are"), what does literature tell us about the modern alimentary subject consuming and or pondering the foods altered by modernity? Always already integrated into our lives on multiple levels, food could not be modernized without other far reaching implications. When discussing food marked by modernity, what larger social or cultural preoccupations does literature engage? How do different authors, historical periods, literary movements, or genres posit the "the mark of modernity" on food? How might literary explorations of modernity and food inform our own contemporary food concerns? <br /> <br />Please send 300-500 word abstracts and a brief bio to Michael D. Becker, mdbecker@my.uri.edu with "Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity" as the subject. Please include your name, affiliation, email address, and A/V requirements ($10 fee with registration). <br /> <br />Deadline: September 30, 2011 <br /> <br />The 43rd annual convention will be held March 15-18th in Rochester, New York at the Hyatt Regency Hotel downtown, located minutes away from convenient air, bus, and train transportation options for attendees. St. John Fisher College will serve as the host college, and the diverse array of area institutions are coordinating with conference organizers to sponsor various activities, such as celebrated keynote speakers, local events, and fiction readings. <br /> <br />Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however, panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. http://www.nemla.org/convention/2012/cfp.html <br /> <br />Cited: <br />Greene, Annel K., Zeynep B. Guzel-Seydim, and Atif Can Seydim. "The Safety of Ready-to-Eat Diary Products." Ready-to-Eat Foods: Microbial Concerns and Control Measures. Ed. Andy Hwang and Lihan Huang. Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis, 2010. 81-123. Print. <br /> <br />Roberts, Gordon L. Food Packaging: Principles and Practice. Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis, 2006. Print.

Conference Location: Rochester, New York, USA
Conference Starts: March 15, 2012
Conference Ends: March 18, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2011

For more information, contact: Michael D. Becker

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TSE sessions at Louisville


The T. S. Eliot Society will again offer two 90-minute sessions at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900. The first of these will be an open session that invites abstracts on any subject reasonably related to Eliot. The second will specifically examine the interdisciplinary dimension of Eliot's inspirations, poetry, thought, and process by bringing to light correspondences between his work and extra-literary art forms, both ancient and modern. Papers on Eliot and music/musicians, the visual arts/artists, and the performing arts/artists are particularly welcome. Those interested should send a 300-word abstract to John Morgenstern (j.morgenstern@chch.oxon.org) by September 15, 2011. Please include the following information with your abstract: <br /> <br />Name <br />Home Address <br />E-mail address <br />Telephone number <br />Academic affiliation (if applicable) <br />Paper title <br />Personal biographical note of no more than 150 words <br /> <br />For further information, please visit the conference website: www.thelouisvilleconference.com. <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Conference Starts: February 23, 2012
Conference Ends: February 25, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: September 15, 2011

For more information, contact: John Morgenstern

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Wallace Stevens and the New York School


Call for Papers <br />The Wallace Stevens Society <br />The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900 <br />February 23-25, 2012 <br /> <br />Wallace Stevens and the New York School <br /> <br />Wallace Stevens is a poet invoked to define what the New York School is just as frequently as he is invoked to describe what the New York School is not. In "Fresh Air," Kenneth Koch lists Stevens with William Carlos Williams and various "French poets" in response to the mock-didactic question "Who are the great poets of our time, and what are their names?" And while Frank O'Hara was the first reviewer to associate John Ashbery with Stevens, calling Ashbery's first book Some Trees "the most beautiful first book to appear in America since Harmonium," O'Hara was coyer about his own allegiance in "Biotherm": "I don't get any love from Wallace Stevens no I don't." Of course, it was the Stevens influence that allowed Harold Bloom to canonize Ashbery, effectively isolating him from the rest of the New York School. <br /> <br />Following recent studies such as Andrew Epstein's Beautiful Enemies, Maggie Nelson's Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions, and Timothy Gray's Urban Pastoral--books that have revised early readings like Bloom's by situating the group in other traditions and wider fields of artistic production such as the Cold War, collaboration, and the pastoral mode--this panel invites papers on any aspect of the relationship between Stevens and the New York School broadly conceived. Contributions that address Stevens' influence on the first and subsequent generations of the New York School of poets are welcomed, as are papers that examine Stevens' relation to the New York School of painters. How, we might ask, has Stevens been used to construct the New York School, and how has the New York School contributed to constructing Stevens? How can new understandings of this relationship help us to reevaluate categories like "the New American Poetry," postwar American poetry, modernism, the avant-garde, and world literature? Further, how might such a comparison open up a productive reassessment of abstraction along both aesthetic and political lines? Also welcomed are papers considering inheritors of both traditions (e.g., women poets influenced by both Stevens and Barbara Guest). <br /> <br />Please send 300-word proposals for 20-minute papers to josh.schneiderman@gmail.com by September 15, 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Conference Starts: February 23, 2012
Conference Ends: February 25, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: September 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Josh Schneiderman

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Disability Studies and Virginia Woolf - Special Panel for the 22nd Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf, 2012


This panel seeks 20-minute papers that examine representations of disability in Woolf's writings or use her work to think about the relationship between disability and literary modernism or literary studies more generally. It is a special panel for "Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf", the 22nd Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf to be held from 7-10 June 2012 at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. <br /> <br />Deadline for Abstracts: September 15, 2011 <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract as a Word attachment. <br /> <br />Include with your abstract: <br />Name and Affiliation <br />Email address <br />Postal address <br />Telephone number <br />A/V requirements <br /> <br />Proposals and inquiries should be directed to: sfoster2@washcoll.edu <br /> <br />Conference Website: <br />http://www.usask.ca/english/woolf/index.html

Conference Location: Saskatoon, Canada
Conference Starts: June 07, 2012
Conference Ends: June 10, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: September 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Sherri Foster

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UPDATED: CFP for essay collection on James Joyce and D. H. Lawrence


Call for Papers for an edited essay collection addressing areas of congruence between James Joyce and D. H. Lawrence. The collection will look beyond the more traditionally observed differences between these two modernist writers, and will draw new parallels between their works, aesthetics, and lives. Contributors should submit a full-length text (20-25 pp) with a CV to ( joyce.and.d.h.lawrence@gmail.com) by Thursday, September 1, 2011. Proposals should be new work and previously unpublished. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />• Treatments of religion <br />• Exile and outcast <br />• Sexuality <br />• Genre <br />• Italian influences <br />• Colonial experience <br />• Homosexuals and homosexuality <br />• Portrayal and treatment of women <br />• Portrayal of education institutions <br />• Depiction of masculine Identity and scripts <br />• Publication in literary magazines <br />• Treatments of the politics of Empire <br />• Censorship & obscenity trials <br />• On reading each other <br />• Autobiography <br />• The fringes of taboo <br />• The Everyman <br />• Animal imagery <br />• Sterility

Conference Location: Las Vegas, USA
Conference Starts: August 31, 2011
Conference Ends: September 01, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: September 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

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AMSN Symposium 2012: Modernism, Intimacy and Emotion


Hosted by the Writing and Society Research Group and the <br />School of Humanities and Languages, University of Western Sydney <br /> <br />Date: 6th-7th February 2012 <br />Venue: Grace Hotel, Sydney <br />Confirmed keynote: Professor Gail Jones (Writing and Society, University of Western Sydney); other keynote speakers to be advised. <br /> <br />The Australian Modernist Studies Network is pleased to invite proposals for its inaugural international symposium on the theme 'Modernism, Intimacy and Emotion'. Since the special Critical Inquiry issue on 'Intimacy' edited by Lauren Berlant in 1998, there has been an increasing interest in the relationship between emotion and the aesthetic. Recent volumes include Rei Terada's Feeling in Theory (2001), Brian Massumi's Parables for the Virtual (2002), Sianne Ngai's Ugly Feelings (2005), Patricia Ticineto Clough's The Affective Turn (2007) and Jonathan Flatley's Affective Mapping: Melancholia and the Politics of Modernism (2008). The topic has attracted a diverse range of critical approaches from areas including cultural studies, historicism, psychoanalysis and neuroscience. This conference explores the role of intimacy and emotion in modernist studies and welcomes papers from a wide range of disciplinary (e.g. literature, visual cultures, art history, philosophy, music), interdisciplinary and critical perspectives. Possible topics include: <br /> <br />-the representation of, and cultural values surrounding, emotion in modernism; <br />-the relationship between the body, the social sphere and modernist aesthetics; <br />-the critical and rhetorical registers of intimacy in modernist texts and practices; <br />-modernism and structures of feeling; <br />-the processes and aesthetics of attachment; <br />-the role of, and effect on, audience. <br /> <br />Please submit proposals of 300 words for individual papers or panels (involving 3 speakers) as Word attachments to: amsn2012@amsn.org.au by 15 August 2011. As this is a blind submission process please do not include name(s) on the abstract. Please provide your name(s), paper/panel title, institutional affiliation(s), a brief bio, and email address(es) on a separate page of the document. Notification of acceptance: 15 September 2011. <br /> <br />Papers should be 20 minutes in length (followed by 10 minutes discussion time). All participants must be current members of the Australian Modernist Studies Network. Information on how to join the network can be found on the AMSN website (www.amsn.org.au). <br /> <br />For further information please contact one of the conference conveners: <br />Dr Lorraine Sim, University of Western Sydney (lorraine.sim@uws.edu.au) <br />Dr Ann Vickery, Deakin University (ann.vickery@deakin.edu.au). <br /> <br />Further details about the event and registration will be available on the AMSN website in the coming months (www.amsn.org.au).

Conference Location: Sydney, Australia
Conference Starts: February 06, 2012
Conference Ends: February 07, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: August 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Dr Lorraine Sim

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Queer Places, Practices, and Lives: A Symposium in Honor of Samuel Steward


CALL FOR PAPERS <br /> <br />QUEER PLACES, PRACTICES, AND LIVES: A SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF SAMUEL STEWARD <br />THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY <br />COLUMBUS, OH <br />MAY 18-19, 2012 <br /> <br />Deadline for proposals: Aug. 12, 2011 <br /> <br />Confirmed speakers <br />Joseph Boone, Tim Dean, Kale Fajardo, Roderick Ferguson, Brian Glavey, Scott Herring, Eithne Lubhéid, Victor Mendoza, Deborah Miranda, José Esteban Muñoz, Hoang Tan Nguyen, Juana María Rodríguez, Nayan Shah, Justin Spring, Susan Stryker, Shane Vogel <br /> <br />*** <br /> <br />We invite proposals for the inaugural queer studies conference at The Ohio State University. The title is meant as an expansive call to consider a host of issues evoked by queer places (local/global, urban/rural, North/South, East/West, public/private, mobility/immobility …), queer practices (sexual cultures, expressive cultures, political activism, academic work …), and queer lives (biography, hagiography, psychology, sexology, history, development …). We envision the conference as an opportunity both to take stock of inter/disciplinary trends as well as provoke new ideas and frameworks for future work. <br /> <br />The inspiration for this expansiveness and reevaluation is Samuel Steward, an OSU alum of the 1930s and the subject of Justin Spring’s critically acclaimed biography Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist, and Sexual Renegade (2010). As a literary studies academic, writer, and visual and tattoo artist, Steward lived a highly varied life, coming into contact, and in some cases formed long-lasting friendships, with such figures as Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Thornton Wilder, André Gide, Thomas Mann, Alfred Kinsey, Albert Camus, Christopher Isherwood, George Platt Lynes, and Paul Cadmus. As something of a gay Casanova (and a scrupulous archivist of his sexual encounters), Steward also “linked in,” as he might say, with such movie stars as Rudolf Valentino and Rock Hudson. <br /> <br />In 1995, Steward’s estate donated funds to the OSU English department to further research in LGBTQ scholarship, but these funds have only recently been “rediscovered.” To pay tribute to this queer Buckeye who studied at, taught at, and invested in OSU, we are taking our points of departure for panel themes from Steward’s life and work. Papers may thus address any of the following (or related) topics: <br /> <br />Aestheticism, decadence, Catholicism <br />Archives and material culture <br />Biography, autobiography, life-writing <br />Body art and modification <br />Colonialism, imperialism, decolonization <br />Expatriatism, migration, diaspora <br />Genealogies, invented traditions <br />Modernism <br />Performativity, self-elaboration, world-making <br />Popular genres (pulp, erotica, mystery novels) <br />Public intellectuals and subcultural lives <br />Queer life in the academy, 1920-present <br />Race and ethnicity <br />Regionalism (especially the Midwest) <br />Rural, urban, suburban sexual geographies <br />Sailors, seamen, and other seafarers <br />Sexology (especially Havelock Ellis and Kinsey) <br />Sexual pleasure and perversity (BDSM, porn, hustling) <br />Visualities (painting, photography, film) <br /> <br />In addition, we are planning to publish a collection of essays on Samuel Steward after the conference. Thus, papers that focus on any aspect of Steward’s life and work are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Send 500-word abstract and 2-page CV by Aug. 12, 2011 to Joe Ponce ponce.8@osu.edu. <br /> <br />Direct inquiries to Debra Moddelmog moddelmog.1@osu.edu or ponce.8@osu.edu. <br /> <br />Conference organizing committee <br />Mollie Blackburn <br />Andrea Breau <br />Debanuj DasGupta <br />Tommy Davis <br />Ally Day <br />Nikki Engel <br />Meg LeMay <br />Chris Lewis <br />Corinne Martin <br />Debra Moddelmog <br />Joe Ponce <br />Jim Sanders <br />Mary Thomas <br />Blake Wilder <br />Shannon Winnubst <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Conference Starts: May 18, 2012
Conference Ends: May 19, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: August 12, 2011

For more information, contact: Tommy Davis

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SHAW: The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Call for Papers for SHAW 32: “Shaw and the City”


<br />What inexpensive pleasure can be greater than that of strolling through London of an evening, and reconstructing it in imagination? . . . You make Notting Hill low and exalt Maida-vale by carting the one to the other . . . you extend the embankment from Blackfriars to the Tower as an eligible nocturnal promenade. . . you build an underground London in the bowels of the metropolis, and an overhead London piercing the fog curtain above on viaducts, with another and another and another atop of these, until you have piled up, six cities deep, to Alpine altitudes with a different climate at each level. . . . For purposes of transit you will devise a system of pneumatic tubes, through which passengers, previously treated by experienced dentists with nitrous oxide, can be blown from Kensington to Mile-end in a breath. . . . What a London that would be! <br /> <br /> ~Bernard Shaw, “Ideal London,” Pall Mall Gazette (5 October 1886) <br /> <br />SHAW 32 will be devoted to the theme “Shaw and the City,” with Desmond Harding as guest editor. “Shaw and the City” will provide a composite picture of Shaw coming into his several roles as dramatist, critic, and cultural commentator in active exchange with the metropolis as a site of convergent literary traditions and histories, as well as a crossing-point of emerging national, cultural, political, social, and artistic boundaries. Inquiries and manuscript submissions should be sent to him at hardi1d@cmich.edu or mailed to Dr. Desmond Harding, Department of English Language and Literature, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859. Deadline: 1 August 2011. <br /> <br />Link: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_shaw.html <br /> <br />The editor welcomes contributions from a variety of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives that speak to Shaw’s diverse representations of urban modernity, which may include but are not limited to: <br /> <br /> <br />I. Literary and Dramatic London <br />Literary, political, media, and popular cultures <br />Libraries, archives, publishers, markets <br />Cosmopolitan art and political commitment <br />International and/or geomodernism <br />London theater/British theater/Irish theater/international theater <br />West End theater and East End drama <br />Perceptions of boundaries, streetscapes, and neighborhoods <br />“Polyphonic” London <br />II. Metropolitan Identities <br />The flâneur in the city <br />London as “contact zone”: or, colonial and/or postcolonial geographies and identities <br />The metropolis and mental life <br />Ideologies and/or mythologies of empire <br />Modernism/modernity <br />Home, homeland, and “Home Rule” <br /> <br />Sex and the city; or, the “erotics” of space and/or place <br />Deviance, disorder and criminality <br />III. The Urban Imaginary <br />The poetics and polemics of industrial modernity <br />The city at war and peace <br />Textual inscriptions of urban technologies; or, “planes, trains, and automobiles” <br />Alienation and ghettoization <br />Victorian and/or Edwardian understandings and/or theorizations of metropolitan urban space <br />Metropolis/metropole <br />Capitalist urbanization and space <br />London’s political and urban landscapes <br />Urban identities of migration, displacement, and mobility <br /> <br />

Conference Location: print journal, print journal
Conference Starts: July 31, 2011
Conference Ends: August 01, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: August 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Desmond Harding

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Submissions for a Book collection addressing areas of congruence in James Joyce and D. H. Lawrence


Contact e-mail: <br />joyce.and.d.h.lawrence@gmail.com <br /> <br />Call for Papers for an edited essay collection addressing areas of congruence between James Joyce and D. H. Lawrence. The collection will look beyond the more traditionally observed differences between these two modernist writers, and will draw new parallels between their works, aesthetics, and lives. Contributors should submit a full-length text (20-25 pp) with a CV to (joyce.and.d.h.lawrence@gmail.com) by Wednesday, June 1, 2011. Proposals should be new work and previously unpublished. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: <br /> <br /> <br />• Treatments of religion <br />• Exile and outcast <br />• Sexuality <br />• Genre <br />• Italian influences <br />• Colonial experience <br />• Homosexuals and homosexuality <br />• Portrayal and treatment of women <br />• Portrayal of education institutions <br />• Depiction of masculine Identity and scripts <br />• Publication in literary magazines <br />• Treatments of the politics of Empire <br />• Censorship & obscenity trials <br />• On reading each other <br />• Autobiography <br />• The fringes of taboo <br />• The Everyman <br />• Animal imagery <br />• Sterility <br />

Conference Location: Not Applicable, Not Applicable
Conference Starts: January 01, 2011
Conference Ends: June 01, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

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Rhys Matters: Critical Essays on Jean Rhys


Rhys Matters: Critical Essays on Jean Rhys <br /> <br />We seek submissions of completed essays for a collection on the writings of Jean Rhys. Although Rhys’s critical reputation has steadily grown since the publication of _Wide Sargasso Sea_ in 1966 and her death in 1979, only one edited collection of Rhys criticism has been published to date. In fact, given the sense that there is an emerging “industry” devoted to Rhys and her work, the lack of a collection of current scholarship on Rhys is puzzling and perhaps speaks to the challenges of categorizing a writer who crosses the boundaries of modernism, postcolonial studies, Caribbean studies and women’s and gender studies. <br /> <br />This book will seek to position Rhys as an important writer in multiple genres and fields of study. We envision this collection as a wide-ranging examination of the variety of Rhys’s work, including consideration of her letters, short stories, and memoirs as well as the novels. We encourage submissions that examine Rhys’s work through the lens of any of the fields listed above, or that use Rhys’s work to examine the connections between them. We are particularly interested in essays that expand the critical discourse about Rhys beyond _Wide Sargasso Sea_. <br /> <br />Possible topics include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />• Domesticity and Rhys <br />• Rhys and National Identities <br />• Rhys and Reading / Reading in Rhys <br />• Landscape in Rhys / Rhys and place <br />• Rhys's Short Stories <br />• Rhys and Other Colonial Women Writers <br />• Rhys and Transnational/Plantation/Caribbean Modernisms <br />• Maternity in Rhys <br />• Rhys’s Personal Narratives <br />• Teaching Rhys <br />• The “Rhys Industry”/Rhys’s Place in Literary Studies <br /> <br /> <br />Complete essays of 20-25 pages are due by June 1, 2011. Contributors will be advised of whether their submission has been accepted by August 1, 2011. Please send any questions to Mary Wilson (mary.wilson_at_cnu.edu) or Kerry Johnson (kerry.johnson_at_merrimack.edu). <br />

Conference Location: n/a, n/a
Conference Starts: June 01, 2011
Conference Ends: June 01, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Mary Wilson

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Renovating Masculinity


This call for papers has been removed.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 26, 2011

For more information, contact: Sara Marzioli

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CFP SECAC 2011: Incorporating Culture: Corporate Patronage of Art and Architecture in the United States


CALL FOR PAPERS for SECAC 2011 SESSION: <br /> <br />Incorporating Culture: Corporate Patronage of Art and Architecture in the United States <br /> <br />While examples of both governmental patronage and private commissions of art and architecture in the United States have been well documented, the history of corporate commissions has not received the same degree of critical attention. This session invites papers which explore examples of corporate patronage of art and architecture addressing a wide variety of media from any moment in American history. Papers can consider, but certainly are not limited to, the following themes: corporate modernism; corporate sponsorship of exhibitions and partnerships with cultural institutions; corporate art collections; collaborations between corporate entities and artists or architects; commercial commissions such as fashion, illustrations, advertisements, and industrial design; corporate commissions that engage communities in both private and public spaces; examples of resistance, debate, and controversy surrounding corporate commissions; and how the history of corporate commissions has changed attitudes towards art's relationship to capital, commodities, and the market. <br /> <br />Information about SECAC, abstract guidelines, and abstract submission procedure available at: http://www.secollegeart.org/annual-conference.html <br /> <br /> <br />Please follow all SECAC guidelines and send proposal form and cv to both session chairs no later than APRIL 20, 2011. <br /> <br />Thank you, <br /> <br />Melissa Renn, Harvard Art Museums, melissa_renn@harvard.edu <br /> <br />Monica Jovanovich-Kelley, University of California, San Diego, m.jovanovich.kelley@gmail.com <br />

Conference Location: Savannah, GA, USA
Conference Starts: November 09, 2011
Conference Ends: November 12, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2011

For more information, contact: Monica Jovanovich-Kelley

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Music, Gender, and Modernist Intersubjectivity


This panel will explore how the modernist music salon, modernist musical event, and the poetics and rhetoric of music within modernist writing, call attention to moments of failed artistic autonomy, and thus permit the articulation of social relationships that might seem otherwise foreclosed. In particular, it asks how the gendering of music informs modernism's claims for autonomy, and how such claims might be challenged or revised through a critical exploration of modernism's diverse discourse of music. In the case of Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot's portraits of women, for example, the parody of "feminine" musicality - meaning affective, lyrical, and traditional poetic forms - ironically suggests their sustained fascination with, rather than contempt for, romantic aesthetics. Similarly, Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson's collaboration on the operettas Four Saints in Three Acts (1927) and The Mother of Us All (1946) highlight the pageantry of the avant-garde so as to draw attention to a communal aspect of Stein's seemingly singular aesthetic practice. And Muriel Draper's memoir of her London music salon, Music at Midnight (1927), which was admired for sounding "just like her talk," underscores the ineffability of salon chatter, and thus grants a feature of stereotypical female sociability, chattiness, the same privileged status occupied by music within the modernist imagination. Submissions to this panel should explore ways in which the gendered form and figure of music in modernism animates concerns over intersubjectivity and aesthetic autonomy as they play out in a wide range of texts, genres, and performance contexts.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2011

For more information, contact: Cecily Swanson

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Modernist Revivals and the Politics of Appropriation


This panel seeks to re-evaluate the practices of Modernist appropriation from its primitivisms of the African Interior and American South to its covetings of music-hall minstrelsy and troubadour song. Harlem holidays and mornings in Mexico, Celtic revivals and Smithsonian folkways, Modernist occultisms, ritualisms and ventriloquisms - such exercises in spatial and temporal tourism signal the familiar recourse of literary modernity to cultural forms perceived as anterior, antithetical or elsewhere for the means wherewith to renew itself. On both sides of the Atlantic, and in ways that we have long been able to critique, these antiquarian and anthropological detours return with interest on the metropolitan subject and the Modernist artwork. <br />The papers gathered here will re-examine the cultural work attempted in Modernist and mid-century projects of appropriation and revival, declining to side exclusively with either the consolations of aesthetic innovation or with the insights of ideological critique. Attentive rather to more compromised forms of commodified authenticity, awkward identification and impossible intimacy, we propose to explore the equivocal politics of Modernist affiliation. We ask how incorporative aesthetic strategies engineer new communities of feeling, new social imaginaries, howsoever utopian or nostalgic, emancipatory or exclusionary. How, for example, might modernist writers position vernacular forms and histories to both challenge and shore up the redemptive agency of the state and the normalizing discourses of national belonging? How might performances of racial masquerade encode forms of affective solidarity and fantasies of liberal universalism that complicate and exceed erotic investments in the racialized other? Might the cultural work undertaken in the name of the national popular and the labour metaphysic still afford progressive possibilities? Or do the failures of these and other projects of appropriative allegiance help us read the history of Modernism within, across and beyond the limits of the metropolitan nation state? We welcome submissions that engage a range of literary traditions and methodological approaches to these and related questions. Please send a paragraph-length abstract and a biographical note of a few sentences.

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2011

For more information, contact: John Connor

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Modernist Faces


This panel examines connections between modernist constructions of the face as it conventionally consolidated an individual organized around personality and subjectivity, along with the more general modernist critique of anthropomorphism in art and literature. As Rei Terada has observed, the face, with its “alleged ability to externalize invisible emotions,” is the consistent visual subject of hermeneutic inquiry (53). Similarly, Tom Gunning has argued that in western culture, the “expressive human face” has served “as a pivot between individuality and typicality, expression and destiny, body and soul” (1). In Anatomy of the Passions, François Delaporte historicizes this function of the face in more detail, claiming that the face did not exist before Darwin and the French anatomist Guillaume-Benjamin Duchenne, even though it had long been the subject of aesthetic inquiry and debate by figures such as Descartes and Le Brun. We welcome papers examining any of these or related aspects of the face, historical or theoretical. We also welcome papers on related topics. Of particular interest is the relation between face and expression, authorial or poetic voice, and modernist anti-humanism more generally. Please send 150-200 word abstracts and a brief bio to Rochelle Rives (rrives@bmcc.cuny.edu) by Wed, April 13, 10 pm!

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 14, 2011

For more information, contact: Rochelle Rives

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The Reality of Things in the Modernist Novel


The Reality of Things in the Modernist Novel <br /> <br />Papers on the relationship between realism and modernist fiction; phenomenological approaches to the modernist novel; experimentation and innovation in the novel form; approaches that incorporate “thing theory” and material culture theory. Papers that compare different national traditions of the modernist novel are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please send 200-300 word abstracts to Gregory Castle by April 13 (dedalus@asu.edu). <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 13, 2011

For more information, contact: Gregory Castle

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Modernism’s Global Reach and the “British World”


Recent landmark works in imperial historiography by such noteworthy scholars as John Darwin, James Belich, and Simon Potter have noted how conceptions of the British Empire began to change over the last two decades of the nineteenth century. Where before overseas migration to the colonies had born an innate stigma, the development of faster communication technologies, the expansion of international finance capital, and the emergence of a cultural sense of pan-Britishness all contributed to a reevaluation of the role of settler colonies within the British Empire during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In this respect, this panel proposes to interrogate the role that new ideas about a dispersed “British world” played in the formation and institutionalization of modernism as a distinct cultural movement. To what extent did modernist-era notions of cultural difference and/or universalism rely on an imagined global space that was dependent upon, in dialogue with, or contaminated by notions of a decentered “British world”? How did ideas of a “British world” intersect with or diverge from other aspiring global movements, such as communism, pan-Africanism, and cosmopolitanism? How did the formal properties of modernist works engage with the peculiarities of semiperipheral dominions like South Africa, Australia, and Canada? And how does an attention to “British world” space impact upon our histories and geographies of modernism? <br /> <br />By placing modernism within an emerging “British world” space, this panel seeks to investigate both the commonalities and the divergences between historical scholarship on the “British world” and the “global” turn in modernist studies. Potential paper topics include (but are not limited to): <br /> <br />• Communications technologies and global space <br />• The creation of an imperial British news service <br />• The impact of international finance capital upon modernist representations (especially as it relates to the interwar “Sterling bloc”) <br />• Modernist experimentalism in the dominions <br />• Home rule, nationalism, and the changing status of colonial Anglo elites <br />• Theorizations of semiperipheral modernism <br />• The position of non-Anglo immigrants in the “British world” <br />• Modernist primitivism, British civilization, and the middle space of neo-British dominions <br />• Colonial masculinity in the dominions <br />• Modernist theorizations of the historical and geographic breadth of the “British world” <br />• Reimaginings of “old” Anglo elites (the Anglo-Irish, Anglo-Indians, etc.) within the context of the “British world” <br />• Comparative diasporas within the “British world” <br />• “Plantation modernism” as a global phenomenon <br />• Publishing networks that bound together colonial territories with the British metropole <br /> <br /> <br />Interested parties should send a 300-word abstract and a brief CV to Matt Eatough (matthew.eatough@vanderbilt.edu) by April 12, 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 12, 2011

For more information, contact: Matt Eatough

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The Beats and Modernism


The Beats and Modernism <br /> <br />Modernist Studies Association Conference, Buffalo, NY, October 6-9, 2011 <br /> <br />I visited Pere Lachaise to look for the remains of Apollinaire... <br />--Allen Ginsberg <br /> <br />The Beat movement can be situated within a number of US, Western, and world traditions. One of the most immediate, yet often overlooked, of these Beat contexts is modernism. This panel seeks to explore the manifold ways in which Beat writing is shaped by, responds to, contests, and transforms modernist legacies. Please send a 250-word abstract and brief professional bio (2-3 sentences) to Jimmy Fazzino at jfazzino@ucsc.edu by April 10, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Jimmy Fazzino

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(After) Conceptualism


What we now call conceptual art began as a radical interrogation of the basic premises of art, but it’s worth asking if familiarity has diluted the power of conceptualism. Is conceptual art played out, or does it still retain some sort of power? That question has perhaps become more significant with the publication of Against Expression, Craig Dworkin and Kenneth Goldsmith’s anthology of conceptual writing. <br /> <br />Papers might examine work that is explicitly or peripherally conceptual, e.g. Duchamp, Dada, Oulipo, Yves Klein, Joseph Beuys, Yoko Ono, Damien Hirst, Language Poetry, Flarf, Kenneth Goldsmith, etc. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Bill Freind

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Memory, Modernism and the Country Estate


We invite submissions for a proposed panel for MSA 2011 that will examine how modernist writers across a range of geographical locations contain, transmit, and transform personal and national memories within the structure of the country estate (broadly defined). <br /> <br />Modernist literature is frequently defined and identified by its focus on urban spaces, and their rootless and mobile inhabitants. However, the apparently antithetical spaces of country estates – rooted, rural, and trapped in the past – also proved fruitful imaginative locales for modernist literary experiment, especially (though not exclusively) by women writers. These sites richly demonstrate the importance of memory in modernism – how an era so vocally concerned with innovation so often seems weighed down by its past and haunted by its ghosts. <br /> <br />300-word abstracts + brief bio/CV by April 10, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Joanna Scutts

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Aging and Inheritance in Modernist Literature


David Rosen, in Power, Plain English, and the Rise of Modern Poetry, proclaims that "Modern poetry was never young." Can any similar claims be made for the Modernist novel? Miss La Trobe, the aging playwright in Woolf's Between the Acts, listens to the fertile mud of the history of language, hoping to re-absorb her cultural inheritance in preparation to write another play. Lady Slane, the octogenarian protagonist of Vita Sackville-West's All Passion Spent, refuses the inheritance of a large sum of goods as a form of resistance to capitalist worldliness. This panel will explore the way that modernist authors take up the position of maturity or old age in order to confront their cultural inheritance. How does the older subject, steeped in the past herself, deal with the metaphorical and literal inheritances that connect the Modernist period with what came before? Is the mature subject in Modernist works world-weary, marked by conservatism and the renunciation of new possibilities? Or is he or she capable of drawing on a long life to assist her in the creative, critical, and dynamic re-interpretation of the even longer historical past that Modernists must negotiate? Papers that address issues of aging and gender are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-400 word abstract and a bio of 2-3 sentences by April 10 to glenn.clifton@utoronto.ca <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Glenn Clifton

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Technology and Modernity


CFP for MSA Panel Organized and Chaired by Irene Gammel (Ryerson) and John Wrighton (Ryerson and Brighton) <br /> <br />As Stephen Kern argued in his influential (1983) work, The Culture of Time & Space, 1880-1918, technological developments revolutionize the acutal experience of time and space; and cultural change revisions our perceiving and conceptualizing of these experiences. Amelia Jones argues that the "malfunctioning" machines drawn by the Dadaists can be read as expressions of a "neurasthenic modernism" during the World War I era, with the machine also expressing ambivalence vis-a-vis capitalism, industrialism and traditional masculinity; while Alex Goody argues that modern women writers "confronted the possibility of fashioning a New Woman liberated by the technological forces of the twentieth century." With recent scholarship on what Thomas Misa has called, the "co-construction of technology and modernity," how have avant-garde artists used new technologies as a mode of collaboration and resistance to urban hegemony, as participatory and democratising, rather than regulatory and isolationist? In this panel we seek to investigate the material use of emergent technologies in individual modernist or avant-garde aesthetic practises and to examine how this cultural work has been formative in our notions of the fashioning of the modern(ist) self and community. We are interested also in locating technology and modernity in spaces not typically looked at in this context, such as, for example, the rural, the interior, the feminized, the queered, the racialized, and the other. Please submit abstracts of no more than 500 words together with a scholarly bio of two to three sentences to the co-chairs Irene Gammel (gammel@english.ryerson.ca) and John Wrighton (john.wrighton@mlc.ryerson.ca) by April 10, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Irene Gammel

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Modernism and the Nineteenth-Century


In keeping with the theme of "Structures of Innovation," this panel seeks papers that demonstrate an innovation on rather than a rupture from tradition, and question the so-called radical break from nineteenth-century standards for form, content, and the place of poetry or fiction in society. This panel welcomes submissions that demonstrate concrete connections between modernist American and British texts and the nineteenth-century through formal, political, and cultural modes of inquiry. <br /> <br />Please include a brief bio note with your abstract. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Stephanie Farrar

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Modernist Marriage and Divorce


From the rise of no-fault divorce to nativist anxiety about exogamy, the shifting structure of marriage is a defining preoccupation of modernist fiction. This panel will examine the cultural innovations that reshaped marriage in the modernist moment. How do representations of marriage relate to teleology/futurity? What formal structures and aesthetic strategies arise to represent the dissolution of the institution that traditionally represents narrative closure? Does divorce signify differently in American and British modernisms? Despite the spike in the divorce rate, is marriage itself resistant to modernization? Is marriage a site of nostalgia, a yardstick of historical change, an antiquated relic? How does sexuality (de)form the foundations of marriage in Britain and America? We welcome paper proposals no longer than 250 words that engage with questions of marriage and divorce in American and British modernisms. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 10, 2011

For more information, contact: Holly Jackson

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Modernist Ecologies


Behind, beside or within the Unreal Cities of modernism, are there also Unreal Natures? Among the sparks, ghosts and shells of the human, are there also Unreal Animals? Abstracts are solicited for an MSA 13 panel of three to four papers that consider non-realist, avant-garde or fantasy representations of nature and the animal in modern literature, comics, painting or other arts. How are such representations susceptible to the ecological or economic discourses of ecocriticism, or to the biopolitical stakes of human-animal studies? Send a paragraph abstract and scholarly bio of 2 to 3 sentences to Glenn Willmott at gw12@queensu.ca by April 7, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Glenn Willmott

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Modernism and Picture Writing


How and why do modernist writers and artists write with images or pictorialize with words, whether in experimental literature and fine arts, or in popular arts such as children’s literature or comics? What connections might such aesthetics have with ideologies of biopower, cosmopolitanism, primitivism, futurism, or with other cultural discourses? Abstracts are solicited for an MSA 13 panel of three to four papers. Send a paragraph abstract and scholarly bio of 2 to 3 sentences to Glenn Willmott at gw12@queensu.ca by April 7, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Glenn Willmott

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The Ruins of Modernism


Given a conference theme of "Structures of Innovation", papers are invited for a panel which will explore ruins and ruination as counter-structures or complementary structures within modernism, with special attention to the intersection of ruins with modernist aesthetics. <br /> <br />Abstracts are welcome for papers which look into ruins or ruination as a central aesthetic metaphor or practice in modernist thought. Possible topics might include architectural expressions of ruin, ruined manuscripts, textual or linguistic ruins, the aesthetics of decay, the urban ruin, structures of ruin (vs ruined structures), the "new ruin", ruins and artifice, the relation of ruins to fragments, the body in ruins, ruined machines, ruins as structures of memory/nostalgia/futurity, or readings of modernism itself as a ruin. <br /> <br />Please forward 300-500 word abstracts and 2-3 sentence biography by April 7 to graham.fraser@msvu.ca

Conference Location: Buffalo, US
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Graham Fraser

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Leisure Modernism


This panel aims to present a significant intervention in new modernist studies by contending that the dialectic of labor and leisure, which has not received sustained attention within modernist scholarship, is a key category through which modernists imagined, critiqued and reconfigured modernity. Not only a concept but also a set of specifically modern cultural practices and institutions, leisure is set against competitive and coercive work, on the one hand, and mere conspicuous consumption and abstention from labor, on the other. This panel seeks not only to explore influential representations of modern leisure, but also to uncover how modernists reflexively defined themselves and their art through concepts of leisure. <br /> <br />Prospective papers are encouraged to tackle the question of leisure as an intellectual or cultural problem for modernists. Particularly welcome are considerations of leisure from a transnational or postcolonial perspective, or from interdisciplinary perspectives (such as architecture, sociology, or geography). Send 300-500 word abstracts, along with a 2-3 sentence biographical statement, to both Christian Gerzso at christian.gerzso@nyu.edu and Shawna Ross at smr343@psu.edu by April 7. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Shawna Ross

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THE INCONVENIENT POLITICS OF MODERN EUROPEAN ARTISTS AND WRITERS


CALL FOR PAPERS: THE INCONVENIENT POLITICS OF MODERN EUROPEAN ARTISTS AND WRITERS <br /> <br />FOR: Modernist Studies Association conference, Buffalo, NY, October 6-9, 2011 <br /> <br />DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: April 7, 2011 <br /> <br />Scholars who study an artist or writer that has a clear political dimension to their work, or who is politically engaged, must at some point determine how to handle the politics of their subject. If their subject’s politics are deemed acceptable, for instance broadly progressive, then the task may be easier. There is no dearth of studies on the art and politics of Dada. However, what if the subject’s politics are considered far less acceptable: fascist, anti-Semitic, totalitarian, etc.? Often, research on the politics of these artists and writers lags far behind that done on their cultural production—Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and Louis-Ferdinand Céline are two examples that readily come to mind. <br /> <br />If you are working on an artist or writer whose ‘inconvenient’ politics are in fact under-studied, and are attempting to incorporate your subject’s politics into a more holistic analysis, please submit a proposal for this panel. <br /> <br />To be considered, send a 250 word abstract and your CV by April 7, 2011 to: <br /> <br />eialongo@hostos.cuny.edu and eialongo@yahoo.com <br /> <br />Sincerely, <br /> <br />Dr. Ernest Ialongo <br />Assistant Professor of History <br />Dept. of Behavioral and Social Sciences <br />Hostos Community College, <br />The City University of New York <br />500 Grand Concourse, B-317 <br />Bronx, NY 10451 <br />718-319-7933 <br />http://hostos.digication.com/ialongo <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Ernest Ialongo

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Detective Fiction, Professionalism, and the Modern Bureaucratic State


This panel explores the simultaneous emergence of the crime writing genre, the modern bureaucratic state, and professional society. Does the amateur private eye in British or American detective fiction represent an effort to subvert the professional police force and offer a corrective to the corruption within the modern bureaucratic state? Or is the private eye (and by extension the genre) ultimately conservative in maintaining the status quo, following a professional code amidst romantic temptations, and perpetuating the "evident failure of the unfettered free market to deliver a just society" (McCann, 2000, 6)? More broadly, what does detective fiction tell us about forms of resistance to the rise of professional society during the modernist period? How do innovations by authors such as Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, James M. Cain and others alter the crime genre and contribute to our understanding of modernism and modernity? Prospective papers are encouraged to address the issue from a range of perspectives including interdisciplinary, cultural history, race, class, and gender. <br />Send a 300-400 word abstract and a bio of a 2-3 sentences to Daniel Harney at dan.harney@utoronto.ca by April 7, 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 07, 2011

For more information, contact: Daniel Harney

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Architecture and Spectacle


Modern architecture emphasizes function over form, incorporating modern materials and a rebellion against traditional styles. This panel seeks to present several diverse studies of modern architecture in the public eye, i.e. for public consumption. In particular, papers exploring political spectacles of architecture (i.e., the aesthetics of the architectural revival in Mussolini’s Italy; World Fair exhibitions of architectural design; government building projects designed to reinvent cultural identity) are welcome, as well as papers emphasizing elements of modern architecture across cultures and traditional schools. Please send 500-word abstracts to Heather Lusty at heather.lusty@unlv.edu by April 1, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 11, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

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Modernist Writing and the Challenge of New Media


This is a proposed panel for the 2011 Modernist Studies Association Conference. A complex network of complicities and parallelisms between writing and emerging media—photography, film, sound recording, and the like—have been associated with modernism, a period roughly analogous with Walter Benjamin’s paradigmatic “age of mechanical reproduction” (or “technological reproducibility”). Modernist poets and novelists often refer to and draw upon such media in formulating their own representational strategies. How do these media provide the technical, social, and aesthetic context within which modernist innovation takes place? How do such media confound distinctions within the arts between subjectivity and objectivity, between material production and culture, between perception and language? How are they employed in representing racialized or gendered bodies? How do conceptions of the writer as producer (Benjamin) or technician (John Dos Passos) address the changing status of the writer? This panel seeks papers that trace, problematize, and generally scrutinize the uneasy alliance of writing with new, mechanized modes of inscription, reproduction, and dissemination.

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Justin Parks

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Modernism and Justification


This panel takes inspiration from recent work in pragmatist sociology - particularly Luc Boltanski and Laurent Thevenot's landmark "On Justification: Economies of Worth" - that seeks to move beyond sociology's disciplinary focus on how unconscious collectivities exert pressure on unknowing individuals, on the one hand, and economists' disciplinary focus on rational actors engaging in self-interested commerce on the other. Boltanski and Thevenot ask instead: how do people construct agreement and settle disputes in everyday life? What higher principles, physical objects and stable institutional arrangements do they draw upon in order to justify their own behavior and make criticisms of others, and under what notions of the common good do they form agreements? Turning away from Foucauldian, Bourdieuvian and Althusserian analytical traditions that focus on pre-existing - and thus agentless - forces of ideology, symbolic violence, and power, On Justification seeks to describe the making of the social itself, no longer as a coercive force but a situated relation that works or fails to work. <br /> <br />For modernist studies, Boltanski and Thevenot's book - along with the work of their colleague Bruno Latour, and other recent works of theory that have broached the topic of justification, like Sianne Ngai's "Merely Interesting" - offers the possibility of de-reifying some of our own discipline's most persistent concepts: notions of the deep social (as expressed in anthropological primitivism, Marxist base-superstructure theory, T.S. Eliot's "mind of Europe" and Lionel Trilling's "authenticity"); of the artwork or literary work that arise as counterpart or in opposition to an existing social totality (in Hegel, Adorno, Pound and Eliot); of notions of the public as implicitly rational (Habermas, Dewey) or irrational (Gustave Le Bon, Walter Lippmann); or, indeed, the notion of modernist artists and writers as a permanent minority within a larger, relatively homogeneous, and hostile collectivity (so common to sociologically inflected discussions of modernism and the coterie, the "expert" group, or the highbrow audience). <br /> <br />Against these familiar understandings of modernism's place in society, the concept of "justification" puts us back on the flattened plane on which the original modernists acted and draws our attention to the different ways of arguing for and creating worth (as well as arguing against and critiquing worth) that they took advantage of. How did modernist poets, writers, critics, reviewers, teachers, editors, or archivists make references and build realities to form criticisms or agreements? What would a canon of (failed as well as successful) modernist justification look like? What how-to manuals, epistolary disputes, pieces of advice, modes of complaint, forms of talk, and irrefutable evidence would it include? <br /> <br />Submit abstracts of 200-300 words and brief biography to evankindley@gmail.com or l.a.heffernan@gmail.com by April 1, 2011.

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: April 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Evan Kindley

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Defining Academic Work in Modern Languages and Literatures


[for the Modern Language Association Conference] <br />The current economic climate has intensified discussion of the academic job market, although many trends in academic staffing pre-date the recession of 2008. As a complement to recent journalistic and anecdotal representations of academic labor, this panel seeks to analyze the nature of faculty work in modern languages and literatures from an interdisciplinary, scholarly perspective. What characterizes faculty labor in these fields and the humanities in general, especially as compared to work in other academic disciplines such as the natural and social sciences? How do configurations of academic work as variable combinations of teaching, scholarship and service justify or fail to justify different career tracks for faculty members? We seek papers that advance historical, philosophical, and theoretical analyses in order to explain current configurations of faculty work and help us to imagine new ones. 500 word abstract by March 15, 2011. Janet Casey (jcasey@skidmore.edu). <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Seattle, USA
Conference Starts: January 05, 2012
Conference Ends: January 08, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Janet Casey

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Jewishness and Modernism


This panel will focus on Jews and Jewishness in literature and other cultural texts (for example, political documents, polemical publications, medical research, and popular journalism) during the modernist period. Papers for the panel should present innovative pairings between literary and cultural texts, challenging the way Jews and Jewishness in modern literature have traditionally been viewed. They may concern, but are not limited to, the following topics: constructions of Jewishness, stereotype, images and sources, Biblical readings, the relation between Yiddish modernism and Anglo-modernism, Jewishness and the post-colonial, immigration, and anti-Semitism. <br />Send 500-word abstracts to beth.rosenberg@unlv.edu by March 15, 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Beth Rosenberg

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Family Structures


FAMILY STRUCTURES (OF INNOVATION) <br /> <br />This panel challenges clichés of modernist individualism in order to consider the ways that families have influenced modernism, and the ways that modernism has helped to re-frame the notion of family. We invite papers that investigate how modernist authors and artists re-imagined relationships between parents and children, between siblings, as well as among members of extended families and chosen domestic units, such as utopian communities and communes. We are especially interested in the relationship between forms of familial innovation lived out in the experience of exemplary modernists and played out in their work. Please send submissions by March 15th to Chris Reed (English and Visual Culture, Penn State) at cgr11@psu.edu and Libby Bischof (History, University of Southern Maine) ebischof@usm.maine.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Chris Reed

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Women of the Woolf: Influence, Affinity, Obscurity


MLA 2012. International Virginia Woolf Society special panel submission: "Women of the Woolf: Influence, Affinity, Obscurity" <br /> <br />This panel will explore Virginia Woolf's literary, aesthetic, or epistemological influence on early-twentieth-century women writers and artists (defined broadly) now far less known than she. Interdisciplinary and transatlantic/transnational engagements are encouraged. <br /> <br />Please note that this panel is sponsored by the IVWS, but will need to go through MLA program review to be accepted. <br /> <br />Please send 500 word abstracts to Brenda Helt at helt0010@umn.edu by March 15. <br />

Conference Location: Seattle, USA
Conference Starts: January 05, 2012
Conference Ends: January 08, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Brenda Helt

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2011 North American James Joyce Conference


2011 North American James Joyce Conference <br />San Marino, California <br />June 12-16, 2011 <br />Sponsored by: The Huntington Library, the Los Angeles County Public Library, and other local institutions <br /> <br /> <br />Theme: Joyce in Science and Art <br /> <br />Although proposals for papers, panels, and presentations on any and all aspects of Joyce studies will be considered for the 2011 meeting, the Conference Committee especially encourages submissions that address scientific and artistic aspects of Joyce's work and its subsequent influence. Possible areas of emphasis for the 2011 meeting include, but are not limited to: <br /> <br />* Scientific foundations of Joyce's work <br />* The union of Bloom and Stephen under the designations

Conference Location: San Marino, CA, U.S.A.
Conference Starts: June 12, 2011
Conference Ends: June 16, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Jim LeBlanc

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Strindberg and Modernism


MLA 2012: Scandinavian Studies Discussion Group <br /> <br />Strindberg and Modernism: Strindberg's influence on modernism and modernist influence on Strindberg. <br /> <br />Papers invited addressing any aspect of Strindberg's work, for example in a global context, and covering aesthetics, polemics, avant-garde, multilingualism or any other topic relevant to panel topic. <br /> <br />Abstract Deadline March 1 to aws@illinois.edu

Conference Location: Seattle, USA
Conference Starts: January 05, 2012
Conference Ends: January 08, 2012

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2011

For more information, contact: Anna Stenport

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Theories of Life Conference/Feb. 26, 2011/Rutgers-New Brunswick, NJ


Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries <br />Rutgers Interdisciplinary Humanities Conference <br /> <br />"Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries" brings together <br />scholars from across the humanities to investigate the centrality of <br />theories of "life" to twentieth and twenty-first century theory and <br />cultural production. In fields as diverse as vitalism, feminism, <br />animal studies, political theory, aesthetics and psychoanalysis, <br />presenters will highlight how the humanities investigates the <br />ontological properties and ethical imperatives of life. <br /> <br />Plenary Speaker: Donna V. Jones, UC-Berkeley English: "The Career of <br />Living Things is Continuous" <br /> <br />Saturday, February 26, 2011 <br />9am-7pm <br />Murray Hall, Plangere Center <br />Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ <br />More Information and free registration at: <br />http://theoriesoflifeconference.wordpress.com/ <br />----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- <br />Schedule: <br />9:00 am Coffee and Tea <br /> <br />9:15 Introduction <br /> <br />9:30-11:00 Panel 1: Philosophies and Life: Values, Objects, Methods <br />moderator, Octavio Gonzalez, Rutgers University English <br /> <br />- "Hunger and Happiness" - Richard Dienst, Rutgers University, English <br />- “The Strange Fact of Critical Theory: Medusa, Feminist Poetics, and <br />the Wonder of Ekphrasis”- Anne Keefe, Rutgers University, English and <br />Tyson Lewis, Montclair State University, Department of Educational <br />Foundations <br />- “Life After Death: Freud’s Biogonic Myth”- Benjamin Fong, Columbia <br />University, Religion <br />- “What is a Lichen?: Species, Symbiosis, Reduction” - Derek Woods, <br />University of British Columbia, English <br /> <br />11:15 -12:45 Panel 2: Vitalist Traditions in Cultural Expression <br />moderator, Fred Solinger, Rutgers English <br /> <br />- “The Vitalist Debate in American Literature, 1950-2000”- John <br />McClure, Rutgers University English <br />- “Nietzschean Vitalism in German Musical Modernism”- Jonathan Gentry, <br />Brown University History - <br />- “The Limits of Life in the 20th and 21st Century: The Fetus and the <br />Refugee”- Heather Latimer, University of Manchester, English and <br />American Studies <br />- “History in the Service of Life: Nietzsche and Deleuze” - Allison M. <br />Merrick, University of Southampton, Philosophy <br /> <br />12:45-1:45 Lunch <br /> <br />2:00-3:15 Panel 3: Posthuman Ontologies and Subjectivites <br />moderator, Becca Klaver, Rutgers University, English <br /> <br />- "Life or Lives: The Question of 'Actually Existing Animals' " - <br />Marianne DeKoven, Rutgers University, English <br />- “Life After Humanism”- Rachel Greenwald Smith, Saint Louis University, English <br />- “"Artificial Life: Figuring the Robot and the End of the Human(ist) <br />World” - Bryan Conn, Case Western Reserve University, English <br /> <br />3:30-4:45 Panel 4: The (Bio)Politics of Life: Regulating and Organizing Life <br />moderator, Candice Amich, Rutgers English <br /> <br />- “Life at War: Biopower and Feminist Dissensus” - Harriet Davidson, <br />Rutgers University, English and Women and Gender Studies <br />- “Liberated Futures/ Multi-Dimensional Ruptures: Late Marcuse and <br />Black Critical Theory"- Carter Mathes, Rutgers University, English <br />- “When Thought and Life Coincide: Plasticity and Agamben’s <br />Form-of-Life”- Kelly Kawar, UC-Santa Barbara, English <br /> <br />5:00 - 7:00 Plenary Session: Donna Jones, UC-Berkeley English, <br />"The Career of Living Things is Continuous" - Introduced by Carter <br />Mathes, Rutgers University, English <br /> <br />A reception will follow. <br /> <br />For complete schedule, abstracts and registration: <br />http://theoriesoflifeconference.wordpress.com/ <br />Contact: Philip Longo, phlongo@eden.rutgers.edu, Tyler Bradway, <br />tyler.bradway@gmail.com

Conference Location: New Brunswick, USA
Conference Starts: February 26, 2011
Conference Ends: February 27, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: February 26, 2011

For more information, contact: Tyler Bradway

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Impersonality beyond &quot;Tradition&quot;


Impersonality is usually linked to

Conference Location: Buffalo, USA
Conference Starts: October 06, 2011
Conference Ends: October 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: February 22, 2011

For more information, contact: Claire Laville

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[Pre]Occupations: Working, Seizing, Dwelling


[Pre]Occupations: Working, Seizing, Dwelling (Saturday, April 16th, 2011) <br />The 5th Annual Graduate Student Conference hosted by the Department of English at the University of Rhode Island <br /> <br />Keynote Speaker: Dr. Timothy Brennan, Professor of English, Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature, and American Studies at The University of Minnesota, and author of several books, including Secular Devotion: Afro-Latin Music and Imperial Jazz (2008), Wars of Position: The Cultural Politics of Left and Right (2006), and At Home in the World: Cosmopolitanism Now (1997). <br /> <br />The Latin root of

Conference Location: Kingston, Rhode Island, USA
Conference Starts: April 16, 2011
Conference Ends: April 16, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: February 20, 2011

For more information, contact: Michael Becker & Kim Evelyn

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TS Eliot Society 2011 (Paris)


CALL FOR PAPERS <br /> <br />The T. S. Eliot Society's annual meeting will be held in Paris to commemorate the centenary of Eliot's vital postgraduate year in that city. Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be forwarded by February 13, 2011, to the President, David Chinitz. <br /> <br />Conference sessions will be held in the Latin Quarter, at the centrally located Institut du monde anglophone of the University of Paris III Sorbonne nouvelle. The keynote speaker will be Jean-Michel Rabate (University of Pennsylvania). In addition to panel sessions and a peer seminar (see below), excursions such as a walking tour of relevant sites and visits to the old Opera House, the Louvre, and the new National Library are being planned for the week. Please watch the Eliot Society's website (http://www.luc.edu/eliot) for further information. <br /> <br />CALL FOR PEER SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS: "Eliot and France" <br /> <br />This year's peer seminar, to be led by Andrzej Gasiorek (University of Birmingham), will focus on Eliot's relation to France, broadly construed to include, for example, the influence of the Symbolists and other French writers; of Bergson, Maritain, Maurras and other thinkers; all aspects of Eliot's year in Paris, including his experience of French culture, his studies, his friendships with Jean Verdenal and Alain-Fournier, and his later recollections; Eliot's poems in French; his use of the French language in his other writings; his publication of Proust, Valery, Cocteau, etc.; his attitude toward French intellectual culture in comparison with those of his modernist contemporaries; and his influence in France. This list of possible topics is not meant to be exhaustive, and participants are welcome to focus on other aspects of the general topic. <br /> <br />Andrzej Gasiorek is a Reader in Twentieth-Century Literature at the University of Birmingham. He has published widely in twentieth-century literary studies and is co-editor of the journal Modernist Cultures and editor of the Journal of Wyndham Lewis Studies. <br /> <br />The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close March 15th. Participants will submit 4-5 page position papers by e-mail, no later than June 15th. To sign up, or for answers to questions, please write Jayme Stayer at jayme.stayer@gmail.com. <br />

Conference Location: Paris, France
Conference Starts: July 18, 2011
Conference Ends: July 22, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: February 13, 2011

For more information, contact: David Chinitz

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Middle Brow Writing


CALL FOR PAPERS <br />&#8232; <br />The Popular Imagination and the Dawn of Modernism: &#8232;Middlebrow Writing 1890-1930 <br />15-16 September 2011 <br /> <br />Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London <br /> <br />Keynote speaker: Professor Ann Ardis, University of Delaware <br /> <br />The increase in modernist and avant-garde cultural manifestations in the early years of the twentieth century displaced realist and traditional literary works from, in Bourdieu's sense, "legitimate" culture. The former came to represent "highbrow", with a concomitant exclusion of all that highbrow was not. Even influential and critically acclaimed writers, such as H. G. Wells, were derided for maintaining their realist style as well as for catering to popular taste. Retrospectively, the conception of modernism has been expanded in order to be able to accommodate less obviously avant-garde works, but this expansion may not be continued indefinitely. Lines of demarcation between high, low, mass, and middle, in their varying media and forms, need to be identified to enable a more nuanced understanding of the evolution of literary and other cultural forms in this period, and the contemporary reception of the texts and ideas expressed therein. <br /> <br />This conference seeks to examine the emergence of modernism outside elitist, avant-garde notions, particularly focussing on middlebrow literature in its relation to these socio-cultural developments. We assume that, even though middlebrow fiction usually adheres to conspicuously affirmative structures of plot development in order to meet genre expectations and publishers' requirements, this narrative framework is often in a disintegrative state, in form and subject. Such narratives raise disturbing issues concerning the crumbling Empire, collapsing class structures and the deterioration of the Victorian family ideal. For women, in particular, the middlebrow novel provided a space for the negotiation of and experimentation with alternative social and gender roles. In this sense, middlebrow writing can be regarded as a domestication of modernist themes also prevalent at the time; allowing unsettling issues to be raised while maintaining at least a superficial impression of (narrative) stability and security. Based on the assumption that such works reached a far wider audience than those of the avant-garde, by exploring such issues of stability and disintegration this conference aims to advance research on the production, dissemination and reception of middlebrow and popular fiction between 1890-1930. <br /> <br />Papers are invited which address these themes, and those linked to them, with the common factors being the study of textual works produced during the period 1890-1930, in the "British" world. <br /> <br />The conference is organised by Professor Christoph Ehland (University of Paderborn) and Dr Kate Macdonald (University of Ghent). Please send proposals to kate.macdonald@ugent.be and to cornelia.waechter@uni-paderborn.de, by 31 January 2011. <br /> <br />The School of Advanced Study is part of the central University of London. The School takes its responsibility to visitors with special needs very seriously and will endeavour to make reasonable adjustments to its facilities in order to accommodate the needs of such visitors. If you have a particular requirement, please feel free to discuss it confidentially with the organiser in advance of the event taking place. <br /> <br />Enquiries: Jon Millington, Events Officer, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU; tel +44 (0) 207 664 4859; Email jon.millington@sas.ac.uk. <br />

Conference Location: London, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: September 15, 2011
Conference Ends: September 16, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 31, 2011

For more information, contact: Jon Millington

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&quot;Print Modernities&quot; Graduate Conference


“Print Modernities, 1845 – 1945” <br />A Graduate Conference at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. <br />2-3 May 2011. <br /> <br />***KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Professor Mark Morrisson, Pennsylvania State University; author of Modern Alchemy: Occultism and the Emergence of Atomic Theory (2007) and The Public Face of Modernism: Little Magazines, Audiences, and Reception 1905-1920 (2001)*** <br /> <br />This graduate conference will be concerned with the relationships between “modernity” and print production. “Modernity” and “print” should be understood in the broadest sense, and interdisciplinary papers are especially encouraged. We are interested in the commercialization of literary modernism, in the visual representations of modernity, and in the social impact of technical innovations in the printing industry from 1845 to 1945. <br /> <br />Possible considerations are: <br />_Little magazines and the publication of modern literature <br />_Periodicals and international networks of modernism <br />_Modern writings in mass-market magazines <br />_Commercial publishers and the mainstreaming of modernism <br />_Modernist women writers and publishing <br />_Posters, advertisements and the visual culture of modernity <br />_Walter Benjamin and the mechanized reproduction of modern art <br />_Technical innovations and modern typography <br />_Illustrations and representations of the natural world in scholarly journals <br />_Scientific communication in manuscript and printed forms <br />_Non-Western modernities — print and digital revolutions in Asia, the Middle East, and beyond <br />_The complex relationships between printed text and printed image in modern media <br />_The proliferation of artists’ biographies, changing the relationship between artists and their audiences <br /> <br />The committee also welcomes proposals on any aspect of Victorian and early twentieth-century print culture. <br />The conference will be held at University of British Columbia on May 2-3, 2011. <br /> <br />If you are interested in giving a paper, send a proposal (250 words) and a short biography to printmodernities2011@gmail.com. Presentations should be limited to 20 minutes delivery time. <br />DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: January 30, 2011.

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: May 02, 2011
Conference Ends: May 03, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 30, 2011

For more information, contact: Lise Jaillant

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Reminder: &quot;Print Modernities&quot; graduate conference deadline for proposals, 30 January 2011


Print Modernities, 1845 - 1945 <br />A Graduate Conference at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. <br />2-3 May 2011. <br /> <br />***KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Professor Mark Morrisson, Pennsylvania State University; author of Modern Alchemy: Occultism and the Emergence of Atomic Theory (2007) and The Public Face of Modernism: Little Magazines, Audiences, and Reception 1905-1920 (2001)*** <br /> <br />This graduate conference will be concerned with the relationships between modernity and print production. Modernity and print should be understood in the broadest sense, and interdisciplinary papers are especially encouraged. We are interested in the commercialization of literary modernism, in the visual representations of modernity, and in the social impact of technical innovations in the printing industry from 1845 to 1945. <br /> <br />Possible considerations are: <br />_Little magazines and the publication of modern literature <br />_Periodicals and international networks of modernism <br />_Modern writings in mass-market magazines <br />_Commercial publishers and the mainstreaming of modernism <br />_Modernist women writers and publishing <br />_Posters, advertisements and the visual culture of modernity <br />_Walter Benjamin and the mechanized reproduction of modern art <br />_Technical innovations and modern typography <br />_Illustrations and representations of the natural world in scholarly journals <br />_Scientific communication in manuscript and printed forms <br />_Non-Western print and digital revolutions in Asia, the Middle East, and beyond <br />_The complex relationships between printed text and printed image in modern media <br />_The proliferation of artists biographies, changing the relationship between artists and their audiences <br /> <br />The committee also welcomes proposals on any aspect of Victorian and early twentieth-century print culture. <br />The conference will be held at University of British Columbia on May 2-3, 2011. <br /> <br />If you are interested in giving a paper, send a proposal (250 words) and a short biography to printmodernities2011@gmail.com. Presentations should be limited to 20 minutes delivery time. <br />DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: January 30, 2011.

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: May 02, 2011
Conference Ends: May 03, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 30, 2011

For more information, contact: Lise Jaillant

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Katherine Anne Porter Society at ALA


The Katherine Anne Porter Society will sponsor a session at the American Literature Association conference in Boston, MA, May 26-29,2011. The topic of the session will be "Katherine Anne Porter and Kay Boyle: Connections." The Society seeks papers analyzing a variety of connections between the writers, including connections reflecting their roles as modernists and innovators in the short story form. Please email proposals of 250 words or less to Christine Hait, Columbia College, Columbia, SC, at chrishait@columbiasc.edu. The deadline for submissions has been extended to January 21, 2011. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: May 26, 2011
Conference Ends: May 29, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 21, 2011

For more information, contact: Christine Hait

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T. S. Eliot at ALA


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2011 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 26

Conference Location: Boston, MA, USA
Conference Starts: May 26, 2011
Conference Ends: May 29, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2011

For more information, contact: Nancy K. Gish

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Kay Boyle Society at ALA


The Kay Boyle Society invites paper proposals for an open topic sponsored session at the American Literature Association Conference in Boston, May 26-29, 2011. <br /> <br />We invite presentations on any aspect of Kay Boyle’s life and work, including her relationships with particular places, publishers, or periodicals; with literary, historical or cultural movements; or with other artists, writers, and activists. <br /> <br />Presentations will be limited to 20 minutes. <br /> <br />Please submit 1-2 page proposals or abstracts, plus a brief cv or bio, to the program chair by January 6, 2011: Sandra Spanier, Department of English, Penn State University, sxs74@psu.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Boston, US
Conference Starts: May 26, 2011
Conference Ends: May 29, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: January 06, 2011

For more information, contact: Sandra Spanier

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