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D. H. Lawrence: Colonial, Modernist and Postcolonial Perspectives


<br />The D. H. Lawrence Society of North America invites you to attend the 12th international conference in Sydney, Australia, June 29-July 3, 2011. Conference organizers invite established and emerging scholars interested in all genres of Lawrence’s writing, biography, or experience of Australia to join with specialists concerned with his reception by Australian modernists or his influence on more recent post-colonial writers, composers, artists and filmmakers in Australia and around the world. While conference organizers will consider individual papers that address other aspects of Lawrence’s writing, they invite panels and papers on the following topics: <br /> <br />o Lawrence and modernist or postcolonial writing from around the world, including Lawrence’s response to modernism; responses to his work by post-modernist and post-colonial writers in the past or present; <br />o Lawrence and Australian Modernists, including Patrick White, Christina Stead, Eleanor Dark, and others; <br />o Lawrence and Australian women writers; including Katharine Susannah Prichard, Miles Franklin, Henry Handel Richardson, Christina Stead, Eleanor Dark, Jean Devanny, Judith Wright, Elizabeth Jolley, and others; <br />o Lawrence and indigenous Australians; <br />o Lawrence and music: including music in Lawrence’s novels and poetry; musical works inspired by Lawrence’s poetry, prose, or art; <br />o Lawrence and the visual arts: including Lawrence and aesthetics; Lawrence’s paintings; art works inspired by Lawrence, including work by Norman Lindsay and others; <br />o Lawrence and film: including film adaptations of Kangaroo, The Boy in the Bush, Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Rocking Horse Winner; <br />o Lawrence and twentieth-century thought, including psychoanalysis, modernist aesthetics, existentialism, fascism, nationalism, race, etc.; <br />o Lawrence’s literary reception in Australia and around the world, including censorship of his works; <br />o Lawrence on the environment: including responses to industrialism; his representations of rural life; his critique of rural development; <br />o Lawrence on sex/gender: including representations of male and female gender identities, sexuality, and/or queer identity; representations of sexuality and national identity; sexuality and transformation; sexuality and race; <br />o Lawrence and feminism: including modernist, post-modernist, and contemporary responses, including Katherine Mansfield, H. D., Anäis Nin, Rebecca West, Kate Millett, and others; <br />o Lawrence’s poetry; including influences on contemporary poetry. <br /> <br />Keynote addresses, plenary sessions, concurrent panels, and films will be offered at the Mitchell Library, Macquarie Street, in the heart of Sydney. A welcome reception and the awards dinner will be held at the Menzies Hotel, 14 Carrington Street, a short walk from the Mitchell Library. The Menzies Hotel will offer conference participants excellent discounted rates for accommodations. Conference participants are responsible for making their own room bookings directly with the hotel. <br /> <br />The program committee includes representatives from the D. H. Lawrence Society of North America, the D. H. Lawrence Society of Australia, the D. H. Lawrence Society of Japan, the director of the D. H. Lawrence Research Center at the University of Nottingham, and eminent Lawrence scholars from around the world. The committee will review abstracts and notify participants about papers and panels accepted for presentation by Feb. 1, 2011. Details about keynote speakers, related events, and the excursions to Manly, Taronga Zoo, and Thirroul will be announced soon. <br />For further information, conference registration, hotel accommodations, and membership in the DHLSNA, please visit our website: http://dhlsna.com. Conference information will also be posted on the DHLSNA page on Facebook. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of 250 words for papers or proposals for panels of three presenters in electronic files (in PDF or Word 2003) along with full contact details to the Conference Director, Dr. Nancy L. Paxton: nlpaxton60@gmail.com by December 1, 2010. <br />

Conference Location: Sydney, Australia
Conference Starts: June 29, 2011
Conference Ends: July 02, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: December 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Dr. Nancy L. Paxton

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ASLE 2011 Conference


ASLE 2011 Conference: Species, Space, and the Imagination of the Global <br />June 21-26, 2011 <br />Indiana University <br />Bloomington, IN <br /> <br />CFP <br /> <br />The Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) invites proposals for its Ninth Biennial Conference, to be held June 21-26, 2011, at Indiana University in Bloomington, on the theme of "Species, Space, and the Imagination of the Global." We seek proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, and other public presentations connecting language, nature, and culture. As always, we welcome interdisciplinary approaches; readings of environmentally inflected fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, practitioners, activists, and colleagues in the social and natural sciences. <br /> <br />The conference theme seeks to engage with questions of humans' relation to nonhuman species, both plant and animal, and to explore intersections between work on nonhuman species in disciplines such as biology, anthropology, philosophy, neuroscience, literature, and art. Our goal is to do so in a transnational framework that will allow us to reflect on how different historical, geographical and cultural contexts shape our encounters with the natural world and with environmental crises. <br /> <br />The following topics are of particular relevance to the conference theme; we also encourage submissions on other, related issues: <br /> <br /> * Visions and theories of globalization in their relationship to the environment, including the resistance to globalization <br /> * Cultural geography in its contributions to environmentalist thought <br /> * Postcolonial ecocriticism and the geopolitical relationships that have shaped different human populations' uses of natural environments in the past and the present <br /> * Environmental justice <br /> * Environmental literature as world literature, including comparative literature, cross-cultural approaches, borderlands writing, and travel writing <br /> * Environmental disasters and their repercussions, including their representations and cultural reactions to them (including both natural and human-caused disasters), in their local, regional and global ramifications <br /> * Environmental diseases,their local, regional and global spread, prevention and countermeasures <br /> * New media for envisioning local and global processes, including GIS, maps, graphs, visualization, databases, and other digital and nondigital media <br /> * Studies of migration, both human and nonhuman <br /> * Wildlife conservation, including the policies and practices of parks, refuges, and assisted migration <br /> * Ethnozoology and ethnobotany <br /> * Critical animal studies, including the question of a "posthuman" turn <br /> * Biotechnology and its transformations of biodiversity <br /> * The politics, cultures and pedagogies of climate change <br /> <br />Paper Formats <br /> <br />Participants are invited to submit paper proposals for 90-minute sessions. ASLE welcomes scholarly panels and creative writing presentations; proposals for hybrid or nontraditional panels should indicate the nature and purpose of the presentations' unique features. As in the past few years, we expect to receive more proposals than we can accommodate; therefore, not all proposals will be accepted. Proposals for fully constituted panels, which provide a thematic unity the program committee cannot always provide, will be given priority over individual paper proposals. We will accept paper and panel proposals in English and in Spanish, and we welcome panels in Spanish at the conference. We invite submissions for the following formats: <br /> <br /> * 600-word proposals for 20-minute presentations in a traditional session, three per session, or 15-minute presentations in a traditional session, four per session <br /> * 300-word proposals for informal presentations/position papers in a roundtable organized around a single issue or question, four to twelve per session <br /> * 300-word proposals for 8 minute presentations in a paper jam, six to seven per session <br /> <br />Proposals for pre-formed panels and roundtables should also include a 300-word abstract describing their purpose and the names and contact information of the participants. Accepted abstracts will be posted on the conference web site. For more detailed information on the different formats and for submission guidelines, please visit the conference website: http://www.indiana.edu/~asle2011/. <br /> <br />All proposals must be submitted by Friday, November 5, 2010. <br />Notifications of accepted and rejected proposals will be e-mailed by February 15, 2011. <br />Conference Site <br /> <br />Bloomington, Indiana, is a vibrant and friendly college town in the rolling hills of southern Indiana, an hour's drive from the Indianapolis International Airport and four hours from Chicago. The city has a lively arts scene with half a dozen theater companies, a wide range of music performances (including folk punk), colorful murals, and the Bloomington Arts & Entertainment District (BEAD), established in 2006 with lots of galleries, artworks and entertainment opportunities. IU Bloomington is home to the Lilly Rare Books Library, the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, as well as the internationally renowned Jacobs School of Music, which each summer hosts a high-profile classical music festival that attracts thousands of visitors. Plentiful restaurants and the Bloomington Community Farmers' Market highlight the city's investment in locally grown food. Griffy Lake, a 1,200-acre nature preserve, lies just minutes from downtown Bloomington. The region also offers many possibilites for hiking, birdwatching and aquatic adventures. National Geographic recently ranked Bloomington one of America’s "top adventure towns" thanks to the many opportunities for recreation it offers. <br /> <br />Indiana University's campus, which landscape artist Thomas Gaines has called one of the five most beautiful in America, is located near downtown Bloomington. The campus is fully wired and wireless, and all classrooms for concurrent sessions are equipped for computer projection and Internet access. Conference housing will be provided in the university’s newly built residence center offering 2, 3, or 4-bedroom suites. Accommodations will also be available at the Hilton Garden Inn, within easy walking distance from campus (http://hiltongardeninn.hilton.com). Downtown Bloomington can be reached via regular shuttle bus service from the newly built Indianapolis International Airport (http://www.indianapolisairport.com/). Both Indiana University and ASLE are committed to making the conference as accessible for the disabled as possible; the conference website will provide more detail. <br />Field Sessions and Post-Conference Field Trips <br /> <br />As with past conferences, there will a number of half-day field excursions on Friday afternoon and several post-conference field trips on Sunday. Destinations will include the Lilly Rare Book Room; Goose Pond, one of the largest restored wetland areas in the Midwest; Lake Monroe, a successful bald eagle restoration site; the Stone Age Institute; New Harmony, site of two of America's utopian communities; and the Audubon Museum in Kentucky. <br /> <br />Questions about the program? Email Ursula Heise at uheise@stanford.edu. <br />Questions about the conference site and field sessions? Email Christoph Irmscher at christoph.irmscher@gmail.com. <br />IU Indiana University | IU Bloomington | College of Arts & Sciences | ASLE 2011 <br />Copyright 2010, The Trustees of Indiana University | Copyright Complaints | Last Updated: 19 July 2010

Conference Location: Blooomington, IN, USA
Conference Starts: June 21, 2011
Conference Ends: June 26, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: November 05, 2010

For more information, contact: Ursula K. Heise

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Uncovering the Tradition of Vitalism in 20th Century Literature (NEMLA)


Call for Papers <br /> <br />Uncovering the Tradition of Vitalism in 20th Century Literature <br /> <br />42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) <br />April 7-10, 2011 <br />New Brunswick, NY – Hyatt New Brunswick <br />Host Institution: Rutgers University <br /> <br />Critics of 20th century literature have begun to focus their attention on the relationship between literature and theories of vitalism, the belief that the material world and humans are best understood as being shaped by a dynamic field of energy and flow. As Deleuze and Guattari argue in *Anti-Oedipus* (1972), a given person is “a conjunction of flows of life and of society that this body and this person intercept, receive, and transmit.” Developing out of Henri Bergson’s scientific theory of élan vital (vital force), in the early 20th century vitalism moved into literature and theoretical work as it became increasingly discredited in science. Within modernist literature, vitalism’s ontological claims are often coupled with ethical and political claims that argue for the free flow of instinct, libido and passion against institutional repression and control. For example, the historical avant-garde favored an explosion of life force against an increasingly mechanized society. Similarly, the New Left and counterculture movements of the mid-century developed their radical politics by equating authoritarian oppression with instinctual repression. As such, Herbert Marcuse in *Eros and Civilization* (1963) claims, “Today the fight for life, the fight for Eros, is the political fight.” Literature from modernists like D.H. Lawrence and Henry Miller and postmodernists like Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon and Toni Morrison features prominently in discussions of vitalism in the political-theoretical works of Deleuze and Guattari, Marcuse and contemporary critics of vitalist literature. In imaginative literary work, theorists see modes of knowledge, being, and politics which are anti-dialectical, anti-rational, and accordingly, potentially liberatory. This panel seeks to examine literary texts that may be termed “vitalist,” as well as to account for the historical rise of vitalism and its influence on modernist literature. <br /> <br /> <br />Submission Instructions <br /> <br />This panel seeks submissions that address literatures of vitalism as well as ones that examine vitalist theories and politics. We are primarily interested in twentieth century literature, but also welcome submissions about vitalism in other periods (e.g. Romanticism and the Renaissance). Please submit 250-500 word abstracts to Philip Longo, plongo@gmail.com. <br /> <br />Deadline: September 30, 2010 <br /> <br />Please include with your abstract: <br /> <br />Name and Affiliation <br />Email address <br />Postal address <br />Telephone number <br />A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration) <br /> <br />The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 360 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2011 Convention will be posted in June: www.nemla.org. <br /> <br />Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. Do not accept a slot if you may cancel to present on another session. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Conference Starts: April 07, 2011
Conference Ends: April 10, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2010

For more information, contact: Philip Longo

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Twentieth-Century Blake


Call for Papers <br /> <br />Twentieth-Century Blake (Abstracts Due 9/30/2010; NeMLA Conference April 7-10, <br />2011) <br /> <br />Jon Gagas / Temple University <br />contact email: <br />jongagas@temple.edu <br /> <br />Abstract Deadline: September 30, 2010 <br /> <br />42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) <br />April 7-10, 2011 <br />New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick <br />Host Institution: Rutgers University <br /> <br />Recent scholarship has explored William Blake’s influence on a number of twentieth-century writers, <br />from W.B. Yeats to Philip K. Dick and Laura Moriarty. This panel seeks to find new links between Blake <br />and the twentieth-century writers with whom he is most often associated – Yeats, Huxley, Joyce, and <br />Lawrence, among others – and to put Blake’s art in dialogue with other artists, including graphic <br />novelists, filmmakers, and non-Anglo-American writers. Submissions that address Blake’s relationship to <br />issues in twentieth-/twenty-first-century philosophy, such as subject formation, vitalism, and <br />posthumanism, will also be considered. <br /> <br />Panelists are encouraged to examine Blake’s work with new critical lenses, such as masculinity studies <br />and postcolonialism, and to trouble Blake’s relationship to periodization. This panel aims to discover <br />aspects of Blake’s work muted under the rubric of British Romanticism. By discussing continuities <br />between Blake and the twentieth century, the panel invites considerations of modernity broadly defined <br />and ways that canonical authors have been appropriated in a century characterized by allusion and <br />pastiche. Papers on teaching Blake in dialogue with twentieth-century figures are also welcome. <br /> <br />Please send 300-500-word abstracts as Word or PDF attachments to Jon Gagas, jongagas@temple.edu, <br />along with a brief (250 words or less) bio detailing your research interests and relevant <br />publications/conference presentations. <br /> <br />Please include with your abstract: <br />Name and Affiliation <br />Email address <br />Postal address <br />Telephone number <br />A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration) <br /> <br />Fifteen- to twenty-minute papers due at the conference, April 7-10, 2011. Multimedia use is encouraged. <br />Final presentation time limits will be announced when the session is finalized. <br />Notification of acceptance will be provided by October 15, 2010. <br /> <br />The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 360 sessions, as well as pre-conference <br />workshops, dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2011 <br />Convention will be posted in June: www.nemla.org. <br /> <br />Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can <br />only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and <br />also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. Do not accept a slot if you may cancel to <br />present on another session.

Conference Location: New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Conference Starts: April 07, 2011
Conference Ends: April 10, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: September 30, 2010

For more information, contact: Jon Gagas

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MSA 12: &quot;Arrivals, Departures, and Delays: Navigating Modernity&quot;


This is a late CFP for the Modernist Studies Association Annual Conference, November 11-14, 2010, in Victoria, B.C. <br /> <br />This panel explores modernism's preoccupation with travel and mobility by shifting the discussion from its wandering masses to its more purposive journeys. The exile and the flâneur are often heralded as emblems of modernist detachment; Raymond Williams credits these "restlessly mobile" figures for ushering modernism's "intense, singular narrative of unsettlement, homelessness, solitude and impoverished independence." Yet travelers--those with fixed destinations, whether or not they reach them--are equally important modernist figures. Travelers mark out the temporal and socio-political dynamics of modernism through the textual traces of their journeys (maps, schedules, identification papers) and in their navigation of modern spaces like stations, trains, checkpoints and borders. Would-be travelers, in turn, reveal the journeys that modernism's upheavals could not permit. Their frustrated arrivals, premature departures, and interrupted journeys map a modernism fueled by unfulfilled itineraries of desire, grounded by both a literal and literary sense of what Marina MacKay calls "going nowhere." If the exile serves as the go-to figure for modernist detachment, travelers map instead modernism's disparate attachments. Their intentions--why they are departing and where they hope to arrive--chart a different story of modernity. <br /> <br />Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to, travel writing and documentaries, emigration and immigration, war and displacement, cosmopolitanism, geopolitics, speed and modernist temporalities. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a short biographical statement to Sarah Townsend (sltownse@berkeley.edu) by September 24. <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: September 24, 2010

For more information, contact: Sarah Townsend

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Modernism, Mediation, and the Image Space


This panel will explore the intersection of non-canonical modernist spaces with the images and image-producing mechanisms which create and define them. Papers will pursue the shifting modernist response to the visuality of such image-spaces, engaging with the perception/consumption of these image environments, the relative materiality or insubstantiality of such images and spaces, the reciprocal relationship between image and space in the manufacture of such environments, and the technologies or media implicated in such spatio-image constructions. <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a 2-3 sentence biographical statement by July 16.

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: July 16, 2010

For more information, contact: Graham Fraser

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T. S. Eliot Summer School


The program for the second annual T. S. Eliot International Summer School at the University of London (July 10-17) is now online (http://ies.sas.ac.uk/events/TSE/index.htm). <br /> <br />The Summer School will be opened by Sir Tom Stoppard and will bring together some of the most distinguished international scholars of T. S. Eliot and modern literature. Directed by Ronald Schuchard and open to all readers of Eliot, the School will present two lectures each morning on aspects of Eliot's life and writing. Ten afternoon seminars are devoted to a week-long, in-depth study of Eliot's work. An extensive social program will include poetry readings by Robin Robertson and prominent actors of the Josephine Hart Poetry Hour, walking tours of Eliot's London and literary Bloomsbury, and excursions to Burnt Norton, Little Gidding, and East Coker. <br /> <br />Application and scholarship forms are available on the website, where brochures and posters may be downloaded. The School is limited to 110 students; admission to seminars, which are listed on the website, is on a first-come basis. A limited number of bursaries (scholarships) will be available to deserving international students.

Conference Location: London, UK
Conference Starts: July 10, 2010
Conference Ends: July 17, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: July 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Zoe Holman

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T. S. Eliot Society


The 31st Annual Meeting of the T. S. Eliot Society <br /> <br />Keynote speaker: Michael Levenson, University of Virginia <br /> <br />1. CALL FOR PAPERS. The Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at the annual meeting in St. Louis. Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be forwarded by June 14, 2010, to the President, David Chinitz (dchinit@luc.edu). <br /> <br />Papers given by graduate students and scholars receiving their doctoral degrees no more than two years before the date of the meeting will be considered for the Fathman Young Scholar Award. Those eligible for this award should mention the fact in their submission. <br /> <br />2. CALL FOR PEER SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS: "ELIOT AMONG THE MODERNS." Led by Kevin Dettmar, this MSA-style seminar will articulate a number of intra- and extra-modernist relationships--relationships of influence, homage, anxiety. How was Eliot's influence felt among his modernist peers? What would it mean to frame the period as The Eliot Era, rather than The Pound Era? How did Eliot's example--both as embraced and rejected, consciously and unconsciously--influence his peers and inheritors? And how did those modernist peers affect Eliot's own work? A variety of approaches very welcome here: e.g., Eliot & Another Modernist Figure; the influence of Eliot's thinking on a small group of other modernists; Eliot's impress on the title and ideology of modernism itself. <br /> <br />Kevin J. H. Dettmar is the W. M. Keck Professor and Chair of English at Pomona College. He has served as President of the Modernist Studies Association and the Midwest Modern Language Association, and has published widely on modernist literature and culture, especially on Joyce. With Mark Wollaeger, he edits the series Modernist Literature & Culture for Oxford University Press. He also writes often about the intersections of popular music and contemporary life; his column "Pop Life" runs bi-monthly in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Most recently, he edited The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan. <br /> <br />The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close July 1. Seminarians will submit 4-5 page position papers by e-mail, no later than September 1. To sign up, or for answers to questions, please write Jayme Stayer (jayme.stayer@gmail.com). <br />

Conference Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Conference Starts: September 24, 2010
Conference Ends: September 26, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: June 14, 2010

For more information, contact: David Chinitz

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Old Left, New Modernisms


Call for Papers <br /> <br />Special issue of Canadian Literature <br /> <br />Old Left, New Modernisms <br /> <br />Guest editor: Dean Irvine, Dalhousie University <br />dean.irvine@dal.ca <br /> <br />By bringing together a multidisciplinary cast of scholars who work at the intersection of leftist and modernist studies, this special issue of Canadian Literature will negotiate between competing cultural discourses, allowing their coextensive narratives to engage in dialectical exchange and reanimating debates between leftists and modernists of the early to mid-twentieth century. This dialectical approach seeks to address the conjunctures and contradictions of modernist and leftist cultural formations in interwar, wartime, and Cold War Canada, a dialectic that recognizes the anti-modernism and social-political radicalism of the old left as mediating discourses in the formation of modernist aesthetic practices. Whatever the storied antagonisms between modernists and leftists, and however distorted the retellings by critics and historians of the late twentieth century, new scholarship on literature, theatre, and visual art in early to mid-twentieth-century Canada has shifted over the past decade toward more complex conceptions of the leftist social and political orientations of modernist cultural production. <br /> <br />Contributors to this special issue are invited to submit papers that address a wide dispersion of disciplinary and interdisciplinary interests related to modernisms in Canadian literature. Essays are welcome on the relationship between modernisms in Canadian literature and the social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural histories of the left. Of particular interest are essays that address, but are not limited to, the following topics in the context of modernist literatures in Canada: <br /> <br />Modernisms and Modernities <br />

Conference Location: Vancouver, Canada
Conference Starts: June 01, 2010
Conference Ends: June 01, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: June 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Dean Irvine

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MSA 12: Modernist Revivals and the Politics of Appropriation


This panel seeks to re-evaluate practices of Modernist appropriation, from the primitivisms of the African Interior and American South to performances of the music hall and the troubadours of Provence. Harlem holidays and mornings in Mexico, Celtic revivals and Smithsonian folkways, Modernist occultisms, ritualisms and ventriloquisms - such exercises in spatial and temporal tourism signal the familiar recourse of literary modernity to cultural forms perceived as anterior, antithetical or elsewhere, for the means wherewith to renew itself. On both sides of the Atlantic, and in ways that we have long been able to critique, these antiquarian and anthropological detours return with interest on the metropolitan subject and the Modernist artwork. Such romances of the primitive, the non-commercial and the naïve, traffic in a complex play of intention and irony, love and theft, inseparable from unequal structures of power and (cultural) capital. <br /> <br />The papers gathered here will re-examine the cultural work attempted in Modernist and mid-century projects of appropriation and revival, declining to side with either the consolations of aesthetic innovation or with the insights of ideological critique. Attentive rather to more compromised forms of commodified authenticity, awkward identification and impossible intimacy, we propose to explore the equivocal politics of Modernist affiliation. We will ask how incorporative aesthetic strategies engineer new communities of feeling, new social imaginaries, be they utopian or nostalgic, emancipatory or exclusionary. How might modernist writers position vernacular forms and histories to both challenge and shore up the redemptive agency of the state and the normalizing discourses of national belonging? How, for example, might performances of racial masquerade encode forms of affective solidarity and fantasies of liberal universalism that complicate and exceed erotic investments in the racialized other? How might the cultural work undertaken in the name of imagined community and invented tradition, the national popular and the labour metaphysic, still afford progressive possibilities? Alternatively, how might the failures of these projects of appropriative allegiance still help us read the history of Modernism within, across and beyond the limits of the metropolitan nation state? <br /> <br />Please submit a brief abstract and title by noon of May 3rd to Todd Carmody (carmodyt@sas.upenn.edu) or John Connor (jtconnor@sas.upenn.edu). The completed panel will be submitted for consideration to the MSA that same day. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 03, 2010

For more information, contact: John Connor

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[Update] MSA 12: Classical Sound Film and Cultures of Modernism


This proposed panel will consider classical sound film, or the "talkies," within literary, artistic, and cultural contexts of modernism/modernity. While many influential studies within the field of modernism have explored the transition to sound film, the role and influence of sound film within 1930s and 1940s cultures of modernism have yet to be considered more comprehensively. Proposed papers should have a significant focus on what comes _after_ the coming of sound film, but revisitations of the shift from silent to sound film can certainly be addressed. <br /> <br />Possible topics might include: <br />--Sound and the public sphere. <br />--Networks of social connection between classical Hollywood cinema and literary/artistic modernism. <br />--Literary and artistic engagement with sound film experience. <br />--Censorship and production codes; sound and obscenity. <br />--Transnationalism and the talkies. <br />--Hollywood studio consolidation, capitalism, and the role of the artist. <br />--Sound and film technology, e.g. recording, reproduction, and transmission; technologies of perception; discourse networks. <br />--Automata and the talkies. <br />--Connections between individual films or oeuvres and contemporaneous socio/cultural discourse. <br /> <br />Deadline extended to May 2, 2010; send abstract to Sara Bryant at slb4ca@virginia.edu. The completed panel will be submitted on May 3 for consideration by the MSA.

Conference Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2010

For more information, contact: Sara Bryant

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MSA 2010: Modernism and the New Persuasions


Modernism and the New Persuasions <br />This panel will explore the ambivalent and complex relationship between modernist literature and the corresponding rise of political propaganda. While the interaction between mass culture and modernism is a topic of interest in modernist studies, this panel seeks to focus specifically on forms of mass culture that participate overtly in the propagation of political messages. Paper proposals may consider the connection between modernists and their politics, including the potential influence of propaganda posters, newspapers, political organizations (left or right), or the rise of radio and film on the literary field. Panelists might consider the way that condensed political messages and increased studies of public opinion have been interpolated into modernist works. Finally, papers might explore how artists both participate in an increasingly dire political environment and keep in abeyance the “politicized” labels that might undermine any idealization of the literary field as distinct from its political counterpart. <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief biographical statement to Megan Faragher (faragher@buffalo.edu) by May 2, 2010. <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2010

For more information, contact: Megan Faragher

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Where's Dada?


Where was Dada? Where is Dada? Papers might address the geographical orientations of the movement(s) (Zurich, Berlin, Paris, New York, etc.), or may examine the way Dada has influenced movements such as surrealism, Fluxus, the New York School, the Beats, or Flarf. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract or completed paper and a brief CV to Bill Freind, freind@rowan.edu <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2010

For more information, contact: Bill Freind

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Modernist Circulations


To consider better the ways in which the hermeneutical act requires the movement within and between networks, this panel reemphasizes the term

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 02, 2010

For more information, contact: Patrick Moran

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East Asia and Modernist Criticism


East Asia and Modernist Criticism <br /> <br />The study of modernism

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Kevin Piper

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MSA 12: Modernist Circles


Modernist Circles <br /> <br />While many Modernists worked in movements that defined membership by signatures to manifestos proclaiming an

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Robert Hurd

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MSA12: Modernism, Amateurism, and Specialization


This panel will explore how Modernists understood the increasing specialization and institutionalization of the arts during the modernist period. Modernist literature was uniquely impacted by the establishment of English literature as a university discipline and the simultaneous founding of specialist literary journals and societies in the early twentieth century. Critical projects by figures like T. S. Eliot, I .A. Richards, and F. R. and Q. D Leavis condemned the undisciplined (in both senses) approach of the amateur "man of letters" who had thrived prior to the twentieth century. Challenges to the way English literature was talked and written about influenced the critical and literary works of Modernists like Virginia Woolf and Ford Madox Ford, who actively fought against literary specialization and argued for the preservation of an amateur engagement with literature. Their position is reflected in Gerald Graff's recent lamentation of the specialist's "habit of domesticating difference by compartmentalizing it, enforcing quarantines to prevent contagion, fertilization, fermentation, and other signs of life." Although Modernists expanded and collapsed the meaning of the terms "specialist" and "amateur" in various ways, many critical studies of Modernism published over the last two decades presume the terms to be stable and uncontentious. This panel invites papers that investigate all aspects of Modernist cultural, institutional, and artistic specialization and/or amateurism. <br /> <br />Papers may address the topics of literature, film, history, or philosophy <br /> <br />Possible topics include: <br /> <br />Cultural and Institutional Modernity <br />Race, Class, Gender and Specialization/Amateurism <br />Marxism and Specialization <br />Theorizing specialist and/or amateur modes of thought <br />Institutional Histories related to Specialization and its Discontents <br /> <br />Please send a proposal of no more than 300 words and a brief biography by May 1 to Daniel Harney at daniel.t.harney@gmail.com <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Daniel Harney

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MSA 12: Modernism and the Bildungsroman


While Franco Moretti's influential study of the Bildungsroman in Europe argued that the genre was primarily the symbolic form of the 19th Century, a number of more recent studies have revealed an interest in the wide variety of ways Modernism engaged with the genre. In addition to the tendency to identify Modernism with well-known novels about the development of artists (Joyce, Lawrence), the Modernist interest in concepts of time and interiority potentially opens up new possibilities for accounting for the growth and transformation of selfhood. Possible topics might include: How do Modernist experiments with form and language resist or align themselves with the linear narrative of "coming-of-age"? How is the Bildungsroman used to reconfigure growing up, socialization, and aging in the early 20th Century, both for those coming of age in centers of power and for those on the colonial periphery? Is it possible to have a Bildungsroman about an older person, rather than a youth? Is the Bildungsroman fluid enough to incorporate new 20th Century understandings of subjectivity (inflected by the rise of psychoanalysis, for one), or do new approaches to "the self" inevitably bend the form beyond recognition? And what do we make of the persistence of conventional coming-of-age novels alongside more experimental variants? Papers that deal with the intersections between the Bildungsroman and theories of subjectivity are especially welcome. <br /> <br />Please send proposals of 300 words and a short biographical statement by May 1 to Glenn Clifton at glenn.clifton@utoronto.ca

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Glenn Clifton

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MSA 12: Reparative Reading and Form


Discussions of literary form are often caught between perspectives that presuppose formal coherence as the defining feature of literariness on the one hand and alternatives that see it as mere mystification on the other. Though this impasse has been felt in recent years by critics in all fields of literary studies, modernism

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Brian Glavey

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MSA 12: Modernist Salons


During the early twentieth century, artists and authors came together in the cultural capitals London, Paris, Berlin, Chicago and New York where they frequently met in salons, caf

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Birgit Van Puymbroeck

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MSA 12: Formalist Modernism


Modernism tends to be defined by formal experiment, and yet a high proportion of the innovative and influential poets writing and publishing between 1900 and 1950 employ received poetic and musical structures with some frequency

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 29, 2010

For more information, contact: Lesley Wheeler

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MSA 12: English/Malay/Indonesian Modernisms: Exchanging Modernities


<br />The proposed panel for the 2010 MSA conference will consider the interrelation between English-language and Indonesian- or Malay-language texts, discourses, and traditions. The aim of the panel will be to consider how an attention to Indonesian/Malay studies may change the way we conceive English studies. <br /> <br />Abstracts (approximately 300 words) on any aspect of the relation between English and Indonesian or Malay modern cultural formations will be considered. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts (and a brief biographical statement) to Chris GoGwilt (gogwilt@fordham.edu) by April 27. <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 27, 2010

For more information, contact: Chris GoGwilt

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MSA 12 Proposed Round Table: The Exilic Network and Its Impact on Modernism


THE EXILIC NETWORK AND ITS IMPACT ON MODERNISM <br />This proposed roundtable for the 2010 meeting of the Modernist Studies <br />Association is focused on the successive waves of exiled writers from <br />1890-1945 and the ways they formed unexpected connections across languages <br />and national boundaries. How were the many forced displacements of writers, <br />artists, musicians, film directors, and theorists part of the rapid changes <br />and expansion of experiment during modernism? What were the choices of <br />language change, translingualism, or cultural adaptations that were caused <br />by the successive political upheavals and shifts from the pogroms through <br />World War II and how were these shown in the creative work by modernists <br />(not their individual biographies)? How did they influence each other? What <br />did they suppress, sublimate, distort, or silence form their experiences and <br />how does this persist in their work? <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a 75-word biographical statement to <br />Leonard Orr by April 26 (as e-mail attachment to orr@wsu.edu). The panel <br />proposal will be submitted by May 2nd to the conference organizers for a <br />decision about whether it is included in the conference. All scholars who <br />submit an abstract will receive a response. <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 26, 2010

For more information, contact: Leonard Orr

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Conservatism, Cosmopolitanism, Modernism


In his famous discussion of the development of national consciousness, Frantz Fanon derided the post-independence national bourgeoisie for its

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 26, 2010

For more information, contact: Matt Eatough

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Contemporary Poetries of Witness


Contemporary Poetries of Witness <br /> <br />In her landmark anthology of witness poetry, Against Forgetting (1993), Carolyn Forch

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 26, 2010

For more information, contact: Johanna Skibsrud

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A Fighting Modernism: Canadian Literature and War


This proposed MSA 2010 panel seeks to explore modernist articulations within Canadian war literature in order to map connections between the country’s participation in international conflict and its literature’s place in the field of transnational modernism. Does Canadian modernism develop, as some critics have argued, out of the country’s participation in the First World War? How do Canadian texts about war employ, question, or contest modernist aesthetics? How do representations of war change throughout modernism’s tenure? Papers might address how Canada’s decolonization and growing independence from England affects literary representations. In contrast, papers might also address the decisions of individual citizens to enlist independently and against the wishes of their government, as in the Spanish Civil War. Papers that respond to the conference theme of “modernist networks” are particularly welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a short biographical statement to Bart Vautour (bart_at_dal.ca) and Emily Robins Sharpe (sharpe_at_psu.edu) by April 25. <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2010

For more information, contact: Emily Robins Sharpe

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MSA 12: Modernist Faces


Modernists such as Yeats, Eliot, and Pound were known for their theories of personae and masking, but how do we theorize modernism’s conception of the face? This panel will examine the specific challenge the face itself presented to modernist intellectuals, examining more particularly the relationship between “face-making” and its potential erasure, or “de-facement.” Papers addressing the following questions are of particular interest: How might the face, as it seems to guarantee individual distinction and expression, function with a modernist aesthetic invested in individual effacement? To what extent is “face-making,” as Paul de Man suggests, an act of “disfiguration”? How did modernists envision the relation between face and expression, be it visual or vocal? How do modernists engage with physiognomy, as a hermeneutic practice of reading the face? <br />We invite proposals engaging various disciplines, texts, and methodologies, including studies of portraiture, painting, photography, and film, as well as poetry and prose. Please send a proposal of no more than 200 words an a brief biography of 2-3 sentences by April 25 to Rochelle Rives at rrives@bmcc.cuny.edu. <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 25, 2010

For more information, contact: Rochelle Rives

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MSA 12: Modernist Patronage


Modernism witnessed the revival of literary patronage on a surprising scale: a partial list of beneficiaries includes James Joyce, Djuna Barnes,H.D., Jean Rhys, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. The proposed panel will examine the ways that writers and patrons negotiated this often uneasy relationship. On the one hand, patronage seemed to create a space for literary production that was insulated from mass culture and the marketplace; on the other hand, a patron could be as capricious as a mass audience. Critics have often focused on the detrimental effects of patronage on the modern artist

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2010

For more information, contact: Carey Snyder

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Other Rooms, Other Modernisms: Mapping the Alternative Spaces of Modernity


Granting Franco Moretti's claim that “geography is not an inert container, is not a box where cultural history 'happens,' but an active force that pervades the literary field and shapes it in depth,” this panel will explore what other modernisms or modernities emerge if we turn our gaze away from the canonical spaces of modernity (the metropole, the cafe, the train station, the coterie salon or country house) and turn it towards different spaces: yachts, prisons, lobbies, public baths, sanatoria, street fairs, experimental communities, Salvation Army shelters, working-class teashops, etc. How are modernist works shaped within these unusual spaces? Do these spaces offer an isolated or distinct environment that critiques, supplements, or neutralizes the forces of modernization? Of particular interest are papers that consider the degree to which such spaces can host or cultivate alternative political, economic, interpersonal, or poetic identities or behaviors. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a two- to three-sentence biographical statement to Shawna Ross (smr343@psu.edu) by April 20.

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2010

For more information, contact: Shawna Ross

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MSA 12: Archaeological Modernism


This panel will explore the interplay of archaeology and modernist art and literature. While archaeology may initially conjure up images of museums and dusty relics, its methodological goals are thoroughly modernist-

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 20, 2010

For more information, contact: Stephen Park

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MSA 12: The Social Self of Twentieth-Century Poetry


How is the lyric social? How do poets, poetic speakers, and poetry readers use or presume an intersubjective situation? Among literary genres of the twentieth century, poetry is often taken to be the least socially inflected, a description which slights the varying ways in which verse can engage common or mutual experience. This panel would resist such neglect, and bring together "new lyric studies" and twentieth-century aesthetics, by questioning a stark division of inner and outer in accounts of poetic subjectivity. We seek papers about modernist and contemporary verse that challenge the dichotomy of self and other, as well as the related dualisms of lyric and society, person and culture, poetry and history, and aesthetics and politics. How can we use ideas from philosophical, psychological, and sociological scholarship, as well as literary studies, to describe more accurately the connections between a lyric self and its contexts? How can we apply such formulations to significant instances of twentieth-century poetic practice? <br /> <br />Relevant topics may include address, apostrophe, collaboration, dedications, epistolarity, privacy, publication, quotation, performance, sincerity and authenticity, lyric freedom and social contingency. We are particularly interested in papers that develop a theoretical paradigm through close attention to an exemplary text. <br /> <br />Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words and a one- to three-sentence biographical statement by April 15th to Siobhan Phillips (skphill@fas.harvard.edu) and Reena Sastri (reena.sastri@ell.ox.ac.uk). <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2010

For more information, contact: Reena Sastri

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MSA 12: Modernism and the Machine


This proposed panel will explore modernist preoccupations with the machine in its various permutations. Proposed papers may address the tensions, both productive and antagonistic, that surface within modernism through emerging technologies and the social, cultural, or political networks they produce. Prospective panelists might also wish to consider how and where technology threatens to deconstruct and destabilize identity, allowing for the blurring of the boundaries between reality and fantasy, man and machine, self and other. Finally, panelists should consider how preoccupations with the machine anticipate and provoke twenty-first century responses and/or inspire new approaches to Modernist Studies. Papers that aim to be in conversation with the conference theme are especially welcome. <br />Please submit 250-word abstract and brief c.v. by 4/15/10 to amy.woodbury@tufts.edu.

Conference Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 15, 2010

For more information, contact: Amy Woodbury Tease

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The efficacy of activism in modernist magazines


This panel will ask in what ways modernist magazines have been able to contribute to social and political activism? One avenue through which print culture might enable activism is via the networks of individuals that it engenders (to draw on the conference's theme of "networks"). This panel will also investigate other ways that magazines might engage in activism. By examining case studies, the panel will begin to try and address the question of how efficacious print culture can be in effecting change? Also of interest is the question of whether the conditions of possibility for such activism changed through the 20th century and/or in varying locations, or if they remained fairly constant. Therefore, of particular interest will be papers that span a range of time periods and geographic locations. <br /> <br />Please send me a one page abstract and a cv by April 2, 2010.

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: April 02, 2010

For more information, contact: Rachel Schreiber

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Networked Selves: Relationality and Modernist Life-Writing


This proposed panel will explore the theory and practice of life-writing in modernism, particularly the ways in which the self is represented as “networked”: the subject as social being in relation to others. Papers examining all genres of life-writing are welcome, especially those informed by conceptualizations of connection, networks, systems, relations, webs and their concomitant epistemologies. 500-word abstracts and CVs by March 30 to Janine Utell (jmutell_at_widener_dot_edu).

Conference Location: Victoria, Canada
Conference Starts: November 11, 2010
Conference Ends: November 14, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: March 30, 2010

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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EMiC] Editing Modernism in Canada


Call for Papers <br />EMiC] Editing Modernism in Canada <br />Conference on Editorial Problems <br />University of Toronto <br />23-24 October 2010 <br /> <br />The past two decades have witnessed a resurgence in transnational modernist studies and the emergence of a new generation of scholars working on Canadian modernist literature and drama. This period has seen the publication of critical monographs, biographies, essay collections, anthologies, and critical editions, the organization of several international conferences, and the launch of major collaborative research projects. The Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC) project plays a leading role in this emergent generation of modernist studies. For its first major public event, EMiC is hosting the Conference on Editorial Problems at the University of Toronto, 23-24 October 2010. Sean Latham, Past President of the Modernist Studies Association, will deliver the keynote address. <br /> <br />We invite proposals not only from EMiC-affiliated researchers (co-applicants, collaborators, postdocs, and graduate fellows) but also from unaffiliated scholars whose work in the fields of modernist literature and theatre, scholarly editing, book history, and the digital humanities intersects with our project. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: case studies of digital or print editions in progress; rationales for prospective or hypothetical editions in print or digital media; exhibitions of collaborative digital editing tools and publication engines; reports on experiential-learning pedagogies used to train students and new scholars in editorial theory and practice; strategies for the development of relationships among universities, publishers, the media, public libraries and non-profit cultural organizations (book clubs, reading groups, reading series, literary festivals) to promote Canada's modernists; re-assessments of canons and curricula posed by the introduction and/or reinterpretation of Canadian modernist texts in new critical editions; analyses of series of editions (New Canadian Library, Laurentian Library, Collected Works of A.M. Klein, Collected Works of E.J. Pratt, etc.) and how these series have shaped editorial and critical practice; findings based on research into the archives of modernist authors, their editors and anthologists, and their publishers. <br /> <br />We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers for panels or 5-minute position papers for roundtables. Panel sessions will feature the standard sequence of 3 or 4 speakers delivering 15-20 minute talks followed by a question period and discussion. Roundtables will consist of 5 or 6 speakers gathered around issues or topics of common concern in order to generate discussion among the participants and with the audience. Roundtable participants will be asked to deliver short (5 minute) position statements in response to questions distributed in advance by the session organizer, and they will take turns responding to the moderator's and audience's questions and comments. <br /> <br />Selected papers by conference participants will be collected in a planned volume of conference proceedings, which will be published as part of the University of Toronto Press's Conference on Editorial Problems series and co-edited by the conference convenors. In addition to this collection, we will publish a special issue of Essays on Canadian Writing with contributions from a select group of the conference's panel and roundtable participants. <br /> <br />A limited number of subventions for EMiC participants (co-applicants, collaborators, postdocs, and graduate fellows) and affiliated students will be available to defray travel and accommodation expenses. For eligibility guidelines see the Travel Subventions page of the project website. <br /> <br />Please submit 500-word proposal, 100-word abstract, and 50-word biographical statement via email to the conference organizers, Dean Irvine (dean.irvine@dal.ca) and Colin Hill (colin.hill@utoronto.ca), by 15 March 2010. <br /> <br />For more information about the EMiC project, please visit our website at http://editingmodernism.ca or contact us at emic@dal.ca. <br /> <br />EMiC is funded by a Strategic Knowledge Cluster grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Conference Location: Toronto, Canada
Conference Starts: October 23, 2010
Conference Ends: October 24, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2010

For more information, contact: Dean Irvine

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Bloomsbury and Africa (MLA)


Bloomsbury and Africa, MLA 2011, hosted by the International Virginia Woolf Society <br /> <br />Welcomed subjects include Woolf's imaginative uses of Africa, the Dreadnought Hoax, Bloomsbury and African art, Leonard Woolf and Africa, and Hogarth Press publications. Abstracts of 500 words due March 12, 2010, to Danell Jones (danelljones@bresnan.net).

Conference Location: Los Angeles, US
Conference Starts: January 06, 2011
Conference Ends: January 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: March 12, 2010

For more information, contact: Danell Jones

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T. S. Eliot and Violence (MLA)


For an MLA special session sponsored by the T. S. Eliot Society. Violence in Eliot's work and thought--in relation to, e.g., modernity, world war, gender and sexuality, religion, politics, art, or language itself. Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio to David Chinitz (dchinit@luc.edu).

Conference Location: Los Angeles, USA
Conference Starts: January 06, 2011
Conference Ends: January 09, 2011

CFP Submission Deadline: March 04, 2010

For more information, contact: David Chinitz

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Carried Across: Translations, Temporalities, and Trajectories




Conference Location: Kingston, RI, USA
Conference Starts: April 24, 2010
Conference Ends: April 24, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2010

For more information, contact: uriconference2010@gmail.com

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Belief and Disbelief in the Space Between: Extended


Call for Papers: <br />Belief and Disbelief in the Space Between, 1914&#8208;1945 <br />University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, June 17&#8208;19, 2010 <br />The interwar years have often been regarded as a period of secularization, <br />disillusionment, and disenchantment, yet many of the period’s cultural <br />productions engage questions of faith, Belief, and spirituality. This <br />interdisciplinary conference invites literary and cultural critics, historians, and <br />scholars of modern religion and philosophy to explore a range of topics relating <br />to the collision of belief and disbelief in the years between 1914 and 1945. <br />Possible topics include: <br />• religious themes and traditions in the arts and popular culture <br />• the impact of war on faith and the apprehension of the unseen <br />• new conceptions of the sacred and the profane <br />• the rise of faith&#8208;infused nationalisms <br />• political propaganda as secular dogma <br />• artistic representations of the supernatural or the fantastic <br />• aesthetic principles informed by belief or disbelief <br />• the public and private dimensions of faith and doubt <br />• disillusionment in traditional institutions <br />• the coexistence of magic and science <br />• the role of class, gender, and/or ethnicity in religious identification <br />• engagement with non&#8208;Western religions and those crossing cultural, <br />ethnic, and national boundaries <br />Please send 300&#8208;word abstract and one&#8208;page CV to Geneviève Brassard <br />(Brassard@up.edu). <br />Deadline (extended): February 1, 2010. <br />Keynote Speaker: Gauri Viswanathan, Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities <br />at Columbia University and author of Outside the Fold: Conversion, Modernity, <br />and Belief (1998) and "Secularism in the Framework of Heterodoxy" (PMLA <br />2008). <br />

Conference Location: Portland, Oregon
Conference Starts: June 17, 2010
Conference Ends: June 19, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: February 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Geneviève Brassard

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Wallace Stevens Society at ALA


The Wallace Stevens Society invites submissions for a panel on "Wallace Stevens Among Others" at the American Literature Association, San Francisco, May 27-30. <br /> <br />How is Wallace Stevens, that remarkably unique poet, typical? Singular stylist and thinker that he is, Stevens has often seemed a poet best understood in his own terms, a figure whose distinctive poetic idiom—like his notorious personal reticence—sets him apart from other poets, other problems, and other people. Although recent scholarship has illuminated some of the ways Stevens’ literary, philosophical, political, social, and even business interests connect him to his time and place, Stevens scholars have continued to place him in a singular, often distant or mediated relation to such shared concerns. This panel invites contributions that put Stevens back into the mainstream of literary and social history. Possible topics include: Stevens’ changing reputation in literary history; Stevens’ literary relations (friendships, rivalries, influences, legacies); Stevens within and beyond modernism; Stevens’ poetry among other media; Stevens and social change. <br /> <br />Send 350-word abstracts to Andrew Goldstone by January 20, 2010 at andrew.goldstone@stanford.edu

Conference Location: San Francisco, USA
Conference Starts: May 27, 2010
Conference Ends: May 30, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: January 20, 2010

For more information, contact: Andrew Goldstone

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T. S. Eliot at ALA


The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2010 Annual Conference of the American Literature Association, May 27–30, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in San Francisco. Please send proposals or abstracts (up to 250 words), along with a curriculum vitae, to Professor Lee Oser (leeoser@holycross.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 15, 2010. <br /> For information on the ALA and the 2010 meeting, see http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/ala2. <br />

Conference Location: San Francisco, USA
Conference Starts: May 27, 2010
Conference Ends: May 30, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2010

For more information, contact: Lee Oser

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William Faulkner Society at ALA


CALL FOR PAPERS <br />AMERICAN LITERATURE ASSOCIATION <br />MAY 27 – 30, 2010 <br />SAN FRANCISCO, CA <br /> <br />The William Faulkner Society <br /> <br /> <br />The William Faulkner Society seeks 20-minute papers for presentation at its two sessions on Faulkner at the American Literature Association conference, May 27-30, in San Francisco. <br /> <br />Topics: Open. We welcome papers that pursue innovative approaches to Faulkner’s writings, propose new directions and strategies for the teaching of Faulkner’s work, or offer significant critical appraisals or reappraisals of the field of Faulkner studies. For this year’s conference we are particularly interested in papers exploring philosophical approaches to Faulkner. <br /> <br />Contact information: Inquiries, 300-500-word abstracts, or session proposals to Jay Watson, President, at jwatson@olemiss.edu or c/o Department of English, C-135 Bondurant Hall, University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, University MS 38677-1848. Electronic submissions preferred. <br /> <br />Submission deadline: Friday, January 15, 2010. But submissions in advance of this date are of course welcome! <br />

Conference Location: San Francisco, USA
Conference Starts: May 27, 2010
Conference Ends: May 30, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: January 15, 2010

For more information, contact: Jay Watson

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Kay Boyle Society Panel at the American Literature Association (ALA) Conference


Reconsidering Kay Boyle's Transatlantic Poetry and Prose <br /> <br />Recent critical approaches have underscored the significance of Kay Boyle's modernist and avant-garde approaches to literature, philosophical ideas, and politics. This panel invites further reflection on her relationship to transatlantic modernism. <br /> <br />Papers might address the following topics and approaches: <br /> <br />*Boyle's position as a woman writer in modern and contemporary literature and her life in transatlantic communities <br /> <br />*The role of little magazines or reviews in developing Boyle's modernist aesthetics <br /> <br />*Interrogation of Boyle's work in tandem with artistic movements or "-isms" <br /> <br />*Examination of Boyle's experimentation or the modernist aesthetics present in her work <br /> <br />*Comparison of Boyle and her work with the life and work of a canonical contemporary <br /> <br />*Boyle's commitments to political platforms and the subsequent impact of those commitments on her literary output <br /> <br />*Canonization and Boyle's modernist legacy <br /> <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstracts to Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick (juligood@iupuc.edu) by January 6, 2010. <br /> <br />The official website for the Kay Boyle Society is located at http://homeweb1.unifr.ch/austenfe/pub/KBS/KBS.htm <br />

Conference Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Conference Starts: May 27, 2010
Conference Ends: May 30, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: January 06, 2010

For more information, contact: Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick

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The Space Between


Call for Papers: Belief and Disbelief in the Space Between, 1914-1945 <br />Proposals requested for the 12th Annual Conference of <br />The Space Between Society: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945 <br />University of Portland <br />Portland, Oregon <br />June 17-19, 2010 <br /> <br /> The Interwar years have often been regarded as a period of secularization, disillusionment, and disenchantment, yet many of the period’s cultural productions engage questions of faith, Belief, and spirituality. This interdisciplinary conference invites literary and cultural critics, historians, and scholars of modern religion and philosophy to explore a range of topics relating to the collision of belief and disbelief in the years between 1914 and 1945. <br />Possible topics include: <br />--religious themes and traditions in the arts and popular culture <br />--the impact of war on faith and the apprehension of the unseen <br />--new conceptions of the sacred and the profane <br />--The rise of faith-infused nationalisms <br />--Political propaganda as secular dogma <br />--artistic representations of the supernatural or the fantastic <br />--aesthetic principles informed by belief or disbelief <br />--The public and private dimensions of faith and doubt <br />--Disillusionment in traditional institutions <br />--The coexistence of magic and science <br />--The role of class, gender, and/or ethnicity in religious identification <br />--Engagement with non-Western religions and those crossing cultural, ethnic, and national boundaries <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstract and one-page CV to Genevieve Brassard (Brassard@up.edu). <br />Deadline for submission: January 15, 2010. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Portland, Oregon, USA
Conference Starts: June 17, 2010
Conference Ends: June 19, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: January 01, 2010

For more information, contact: Brassard Genevieve

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