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MSA CFPs Ended in 2009

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T. S. Eliot sessions at Louisville


The 38th annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900 will be held at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, February 18-20, 2010. The T. S. Eliot Society will present two sessions of two or three papers each, with a substantial amount of time for discussion. Those interested should communicate with William Harmon (wharmon03@mindspring.com) with the following by October 10, 2009: <br /> <br />300-word abstract, clearly showing relevance to T. S. Eliot <br />Name (as it will appear in the program) <br />Address (preferably home address since materials are sent out early in December) <br />E-mail address (necessary to confirm your acceptance) <br />Telephone number <br />Academic affiliation (if applicable) <br />Title of paper/work (as it will appear in the program) <br />National origin/genre of work discussed (please be specific) <br />Personal biographical note (100-150 words) <br />

Conference Location: Louisville, USA
Conference Starts: February 18, 2010
Conference Ends: February 20, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: October 10, 2009

For more information, contact: William Harmon

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2010 Hemingway Conference in Lausanne: Hemingway's Extreme Geographies


14TH INTERNATIONAL HEMINGWAY SOCIETY CONFERENCE: <br />HEMINGWAY’S EXTREME GEOGRAPHIES <br />Lausanne, Switzerland - June 25-July 3, 2010 <br />Proposal Deadline: September 15, 2009 <br /> <br />The Hemingway Society invites paper, workshop, and panel proposals for the 14th International Hemingway conference: Hemingway’s “Extreme Geographies.” With “Hemingway’s Extreme Geographies,” the organizers wish to prompt a consideration of the ways the experience of space and geography—its physical, psychological, and emotional dimensions—informed Hemingway’s writing. Hemingway had an acute sense of space and its evocative capabilities. Hemingway also wrote about the geography of the body—the way it imposes its own limits and topography by being marked, scarred, or gendered. Even Hemingway’s sentences, grammar, and syntax suggest the importance of the material space of the story and the terrain of the words on the page. <br /> <br />Featured conference speakers: Linda Wagner-Martin, Debra Moddelmog, Noel Riley Fitch, H.R. Stoneback, Carl Eby, Kirk Curnutt, Elizabeth Bronfen, Patrick Vincent, and Allen Josephs. <br /> <br />Proposals: Organizers encourage participants to interpret the conference theme broadly. We welcome proposals on all aspects of Hemingway’s artistic and existential experience, but we are particularly interested in contributions that explore Hemingway’s penchant for intense experiences in liminal spaces (physical and psychological) as a starting point for his writing. <br /> <br />Topics of the conference may include but are not limited to the following themes: <br /> <br />Corporeal Geographies: <br />• Switzerland as a place of encounter and dis-encounter <br />• Africa, Cuba, Switzerland, Spain, France, and the place of the “other” <br />• The Gulf Stream, Key West, Michigan, The American West <br />• Ketchum, and the unhomeliness of home <br />• Warscapes (WWI, Spanish Civil War, WWII) <br />• Aviation, traveling <br />• Boundary crossing (literal and figurative) <br />• The bodily experience of space; the jubilant/sensual and the injured body <br />• The geographies of sports <br />• The gendering and the ethics of topography <br />• The carnivalesque <br />• Hemingway and the Romantic tradition <br /> <br />Mental Geographies: <br />The literary space: <br />• Hemingway’s sentences <br />• The art of omission <br />• Narrative lines and narrative interruptions <br />• The space of Hemingway’s paragraph <br />• A room with a view: the construction of aesthetics in Hemingway’s writing <br /> <br />The space identity (gender, racial, public): <br />• Remorse; or, the land of the past <br />• Regeneration through violence <br />• Masculine territories and the frontier of the “other” <br />• The construction of Authorship and the defense of authorial territory <br /> <br />Other issues: <br />• Materialism and idealism—the world here and now and worlds beyond <br />• Hemingway and religious sentiment <br />• The crisis of reality and unreality of reality <br />• Existentialism and mysticism <br />• The sublimation of injury and the extreme spaces of experience <br />• The experience of beauty and the sublime; or, Hemingway and the (post-) Romantic tradition <br />• The extremes of the reception of Hemingway <br />• Reading Hemingway in Africa, Europe, Asia <br /> <br />All proposals are due by Sept. 15, 2009. Proposals should be sent to the conference organizers (Suzanne del Gizzo and Boris Vejdovsky) at hemingway2010@comcast.net. <br /> <br />To see the full “Call for Papers,” including more information on proposing a paper, panel or workshop, and for more information on the current program please visit: www.hemingwaysociety.org (click on Lausanne) or email the conference organizers at hemingway2010@comcast.net. <br />

Conference Location: Lausanne, Switzerland
Conference Starts: June 25, 2010
Conference Ends: July 03, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: September 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Suzanne del Gizzo

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A Room of Their Own: The Bloomsbury Artists in American Collections


Call for Papers <br /> <br />The Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University will host a one-day symposium on Saturday, February 27, 2010, to explore topics related to the exhibition "A Room of Their Own: The Bloomsbury Artists in American Collections." <br /> <br />We invite proposals for presentations on such topics as Bloomsbury art production, criticism, display, and collecting; the Omega Workshops; design of books, fashion, gardens, architecture, domestic spaces, ceramics, furniture; ekphrastic writing; and other aspects of visual culture related to the Bloomsbury group or its influences. <br /> <br />Please submit by email a 250-300 word proposal with a title, your name, email and mailing addresses, phone number, and institutional affiliation to Professors Christine Froula at cfroula@northwestern.edu and Christopher Reed at creed@psu.edu by September 11, 2009. The museum will offer all speakers a small honorarium and will cover travel expenses and accommodations. <br />

Conference Location: Evanston (Chicago), IL, USA
Conference Starts: February 27, 2010
Conference Ends: February 27, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: September 11, 2009

For more information, contact: Christopher Reed

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T. S. Eliot Society: Seminar on &quot;Mid-Century Eliot&quot;


CALL FOR SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS: "MID-CENTURY ELIOT" <br /> <br />This year's seminar will be led by Marina MacKay of Washington University in St. Louis. Professor MacKay is the author of MODERNISM AND WORLD WAR II (Cambridge UP), editor of THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO THE LITERATURE OF WORLD WAR II, and co-editor of BRITISH FICTION AFTER MODERNISM (Palgrave). She has articles published or forthcoming in PMLA, Modern Fiction Studies, ELH, Twentieth Century Literature, and the Journal of Modern Literature, as well as in several essay collections. <br /> <br />The seminar invites participants to share and discuss short papers that read Eliot's later poetry, drama, and criticism in relation to their political and cultural contexts at mid-century (1935–55). Important political contexts might include, for example, World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, the rise of the welfare state, and trans-formations of liberalism and conservatism in the era of the totalitarian regime. Among the cultural contexts we may wish to explore are those supplied by reading the later Eliot alongside other mid-century artists and thinkers, canonical or neglected, including (but not restricted to) the writers whose work Eliot edited or championed in those years. Other useful cultural contexts might include contemporary literary- and cultural-critical phenomena such as Leavisite humanism, the rise of the New Criticism, and the emergence of Cultural Studies. Participants are welcome to supplement or replace the specific examples named above with mid-century political and cultural contexts of their own. <br /> <br />The seminar is open to the first 15 registrants; registration will close July 1st. Seminarians will submit 4–5 page position papers by e-mail, no later than September 1st. To sign up, or for answers to questions, please write Jayme Stayer (jayme.stayer@gmail.com). <br />

Conference Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Conference Starts: September 25, 2009
Conference Ends: September 27, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: July 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Jayme Stayer

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The Sign of Stieglitz/ Carrefour Alfred Stieglitz


Announcing a bi-lingual colloquium at Cerisy on art, literature and culture in America as it developed around, or near, or against the figure of the photographer Alfred Stieglitz and his galleries in New York City. <br /> We are interested in papers on all aspects of the birth and evolution of modernist and avant-garde expression in the first third or so of the 20th Century, especially in this first rough metropolis of modernity. A fuller description of the topic and its possible inclusions than can be fit here is now on the Discuss list, where you will also find a short description of the interesting venue for this colloquium. <br /> Papers will run 45-50 minutes, four a day for a week (but attendees often do not stay the full week), with some less formal presentations in the evenings. We expect European scholars to apply and attend, so we are hoping for an interesting international meeting, with a healthy confrontation of positions. Interested parties who do not want to give presentations are welcome and can sign in to Cerisy in the same manner as presenters. <br /> Your proposal, under a page in length, should reach the organizers by June 15. You can write to me, Jay Bochner, for further information.

Conference Location: Cerisy-la-Salle (Normandy), France
Conference Starts: July 02, 2010
Conference Ends: July 09, 2010

CFP Submission Deadline: June 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Liliane Louvel, Jean-Pierre Montier, Jay Bochner

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T. S. Eliot Society: General CFP


CALL FOR PRESENTATION PROPOSALS <br /> <br />Clearly organized proposals of about 300 words, on any topic reasonably related to Eliot, along with biographical sketches, should be forwarded by June 15, 2009, to the President, William Harmon, 400 Broad St., Oxford, NC, 27565; or preferably by email to wharmon03@mindspring.com. <br /> <br />This year's keynote speaker will be Ronald Bush, the Drue Heinz Professor of American Literature at St. John's College, Oxford. He is the author of THE GENESIS OF EZRA POUND'S CANTOS and T. S. ELIOT: A STUDY IN CHARACTER AND STYLE; the editor of T. S. ELIOT: THE MODERNIST IN HISTORY; and co-editor of books on modernist primitivism and cultural property. Among his recent publications are articles on Eliot, Pound, Joyce, Nabokov, and Roth, as well as the chapter on "Modernist Poetry and Poetics" in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. <br /> <br />For further information, please see our website at http://www.luc.edu/eliot.

Conference Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Conference Starts: September 25, 2009
Conference Ends: September 27, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: June 15, 2009

For more information, contact: William Harmon

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Stefan Zweig’s Transatlantic Connections


Papers are invited for an international Stefan Zweig Symposium to be held at SUNY Fredonia on Oct 1-3 2009. This symposium, the first major scholarly event on Zweig to take place in the United States in over two decades, intends to bring together scholars, artist, critics, and students from around the world to discuss Zweig’s life and works. It will include keynote lectures by Klaus Weissenberger (Rice University) and Zweig biographer Oliver Matuschek as well as a manuscript exhibition with archival materials from SUNY Fredonia’s extensive Stefan Zweig collection. The symposium will also feature the United States premiere of Sylvio Back’s award-winning feature film Lost Zweig (2003) in the presence of the director. <br /> <br />Whereas recent Zweig symposia in Berlin and Jerusalem have focused their attention primarily on Zweig’s relationship to Europe, the SUNY Fredonia symposium hopes to particularly attract papers that explore Zweig’s “transatlantic connections,” i.e. the way in which his writings establish a dialogue—much like the first successful transatlantic telegraphic exchange that so much fascinated the Austrian modernist himself—between Europe (both British and Continental) and the Americas. Possible topics of exploration include: <br /> <br />Zweig’s categorization of Brazil as the “land of the future” <br />Zweig and exile <br />Zweig’s reception in Europe and in the United States <br />Representations of the old and the new world in Zweig’s works <br />Zweig and “world literature” <br /> <br />All paper presentations will be plenary. There is no registration fee for this conference. <br /> <br />Scholars are also kindly invited to prolong their stay after the symposium to do research at SUNY Fredonia’s Stefan Zweig Archives. <br /> <br />Please send a 500-word abstract of your paper to vanweseb@fredonia.edu by May 15 2009. Participants will be notified by May 30 2009. <br /> <br />Symposium Organizers: <br /> <br />Birger Vanwesenbeeck, Department of English, SUNY Fredonia <br />Jeremy Linden, Head of Archives, SUNY Fredonia <br />

Conference Location: Fredonia, NY, USA
Conference Starts: October 01, 2009
Conference Ends: October 03, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Birger Vanwesenbeeck

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MSA 11: The Languages of Modernism


CALL FOR SEMINAR, PANEL, AND ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS <br /> <br />The annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association will take place at the Hotel Delta Centre-Ville in Montreal, Quebec, November 5-8, 2009. The MSA conference brings together more than 600 scholars from a variety of disciplines from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and elsewhere. This year the MSA XI conference, co-hosted by McGill University, Concordia University, and Université de Montreal, is devoted to the general theme

Conference Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 11, 2009

For more information, contact: Organizers

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MSA 11: Boxing and Modernism


This panel seeks to explore the historical and aesthetic connections between boxing and modernism, or early 20th century arts more broadly conceived. From Gene Tunney

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 10, 2009

For more information, contact: Evan Rhodes

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Modernism and the Languages of Modern Media


MSA 11: CFP Modernism and the Languages of Modern Media <br /> <br />This panel seeks to investigate the relationship between literary modernism and the languages of modern media forms

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 09, 2009

For more information, contact: Jennifer Sorensen Emery-Peck

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MSA 11: Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age


Conference: MSA 11, Montreal, Canada, Nov 5-8 2009 <br />Abstract deadline: May 9, 2009 <br /> <br />“Youth’s cry of perplexity and pain, typical of this our post-war age of unrest, when, the old values being submerged, youth, in hot revolt against Victorian standards, questions life as never before . . .“ (Rose Macaulay, Keeping up Appearances). <br />The modernist era is often described as a period when an emerging youth culture asserted itself with innovations in literary and aesthetic form. Tension between generations was also, however, a ubiquitous and lucrative theme in popular fiction and journalism. This panel seeks papers on any aspect of this generational divide in middlebrow writing of the period. Sample topics include: <br />• the rhetoric of youthfulness <br />• middle age and its discontents <br />• the social space of old age <br />• youth, age, and the literary marketplace <br />• technologies of youthfulness (e.g., cosmetic surgery, rejuvenation procedures) <br />• temporality and aging in middlebrow narrative <br />• satires of the generation gap <br />• family drama <br />• youth/age and romance/sex <br /> <br />Please send 300-word abstract and short bio by May 9th to Cynthia Port: cport@coastal.edu. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 09, 2009

For more information, contact: Cynthia Port

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MSA 11: The Talkies


Much of the work on cinema's relationship to modernism has focused on avant-garde and silent film. Sound film is always on the horizon, or just starting to be heard, but sound film in and of itself, or successful sound film ventures, are rarely considered within the scope of modernism. This is in large part due to the avant-garde and modernist resistance to sound film, making connections between sound film and modernism less apparent. This panel will reconsider the relationship between the

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 09, 2009

For more information, contact: Sara Bryant

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MSA 11: Modernist Mediums


In his 1891 essay "The Soul of Man Under Socialism", Oscar Wilde claimes,

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 07, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 08, 2009

For more information, contact: Heather Lusty

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MSA 11: Re-Fashioning Modernism


Since Baudelaire famously equated the changeability of fashion with the ephemerality of modern life, debates have raged about the intrinsic link between the processes of modernity and concurrent changes in the visual and material cultures of fashion as an inherently modern phenomenon. Fashion theorists such as Elizabeth Wilson and Christopher Breward have acknowledged and explored this relationship in nuanced and sophisticated ways. What remains to be investigated are the historical sites within the fashion world where the modern was questioned, challenged, or otherwise re-formulated. This panel invites papers on the multivalent discourses surrounding the modern nature of fashion. Particularly welcome are papers which seek to complicate or subvert the accepted link between modernity and the processes/procedures of fashion. <br /> <br />Please submit an abstract of 300-400 words along with a short bio to Kim Wahl (kwahl@ryerson.ca) no later than May 8, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 08, 2009

For more information, contact: Kim Wahl

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MSA 11: Modernist Affective Labor and Biopolitics


Modernist Affective Labor and Biopolitics <br /> <br />In _Multitude_, Hardt and Negri write, “A worker with a good attitude and social skills is another way of saying a worker adept at affective labor” (108). This panel invites papers that deal with some aspect of affective labor, knowledge work, service economies, the “feminization” of labor, creativity and innovation, cultural capital, the multitude, or biopolitics. If we understand the period of high modernism (between the World Wars) as transitional between a regime of industrial capitalism founded on colonial empires and postindustrial capitalism founded on globalization, how can we trace the emergence of the “creative class” in modernist culture? Are the famous protagonists (e.g., Stephen Dedalus or Jacob Flanders) of modernist literature predecessors of postindustrial cubicle workers? How did film and popular culture address transformations of the consumer society and the culture industry as they pertain to new forms of labor and capital? <br /> <br />Please send 300 word abstract and short bio to Enda Duffy, msa2009biopolitics@gmail.com.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 07, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 08, 2009

For more information, contact: Enda Duffy

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MSA 11: Modernism and/against Empire


Modernism and/against Empire <br /> <br />Literary modernism reached its peak, between the world wars, just as European empires fell into their inevitable decline. Imperial modernity was marked, first, by its frenetic pace, technologies and appropriations of alterity (of other peoples, territories, markets, myths, languages or cultural forms), but also, paradoxically, mounting skepticism or critique of empire at home, and revolutionary indictments of empire from abroad. <br /> <br />How, this panel asks, do modernist forms and techniques speak to -- or speak against -- the disciplines of empire? What do modernist texts reveal about the anxieties of imperial power, or about the tactics and voices of anti-imperial dissent? How do writers from the colonies appropriate, challenge, or reinvent modernist forms? <br /> <br />I welcome studies of empire in any modernist media -- literary, visual, film, music, architecture, radio -- from 1890 to 1947. Topics to consider include (but are not limited to): <br /> --transnational politics, geographies, or economics <br /> --reframing imperial narratives through myth or history <br /> --ethnographic or autoethnographic critiques/reappraisals of empire <br /> --transnational poetics; the relation between western writers and writers from the colonies; the new "world literature" <br /> --the aesthetics of imperial violence <br /> --hybridity (in race, language, culture, etc) <br /> --questions of language or translation <br /> --nationalist/anti-imperial resistance within the colonies <br /> --the revisiting/repercussions of empire in the metropole <br /> --cosmopolitanism <br /> --transnational discourses of social justice or human rights <br /> --the role of modern science/medicine/technologies within or against empire <br /> <br />Please send abstracts (250-500 words) and a CV or scholarly bio to Kate Merz (mkmerz@wisc.edu) by 8 May 2009.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 08, 2009

For more information, contact: Kate Merz

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MSA 11: Death Imagery and Narrative Ambivalence about the Future


In response to the pronounced intellectual, philosophical, historical and social flux of the teens, twenties and thirties, many modernist writers wavered between lapsarian despair and utopian confidence about the direction of the future. Literary images of death and destruction register both fatalism and loss as well as phoenix-like creative renewal, alternately as well as simultaneously. <br /> <br />I am looking for abstracts of papers that explore modernist ambivalence about the future through death imagery, to be selected for a proposed panel at the 11th Annual Modernist Studies Association Conference on November 5-9, 2009 in Montreal. Preference will be given to papers that read their novels as self-reflexive and/or concerned with the state of literary modernism. Please send abstracts of one page or less and short bios to Dr. Jennifer Gilchrist at jengilchrist@gmail.com by May 8, 2009. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 09, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 08, 2009

For more information, contact: Dr. Jennifer Gilchrist

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MSA 11: Matters of Taste


The modernists

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 06, 2009

For more information, contact: Mary Elizabeth Curtin

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MSA 11 (Proposed Panel): Theories of Language as Modernist Theory


The early twentieth century witnessed not only a variety of aesthetic experiments with language, but also a new wave of writing about language theoretically. The most well-known is the work that shaped what was to become twentieth-century linguistics: Saussure, Meillet, Benveniste, Jakobson, and the like. But it was not just linguists who tried to frame new conceptions of language: a wide variety of intellectuals from other fields decided, as if in concert, that understanding language was the key to understanding the basic problems of their disciplines and, in many cases, the very fate of European society. A few of these intellectuals, like Wittgenstein and J. L. Austin in philosophy, or Shklovsky and Tynyanov in literary criticism, initiated what we now know as a “linguistic turn” in their disciplines, but others - Ernst Cassirer, Ogden and Richards – made turnings that no one else chose to follow, for better or worse. <br /> <br />In this panel we will examine this flood of theorising about language as itself a modernist move or phenomenon. Our interest will be in analysing and explaining significant writing about language in terms that allow us to see the links between language theory and other aspects – political, historic, artistic – of modernism. Proposals for papers on writing about language in the period 1890-1950 that place it in this kind of context are welcome. We particularly encourage papers that address these “linguistic turns” themselves as in some sense “modernist”. Please email a 300-word abstract of your paper and a 2-3 line scholarly biography to Ken Hirschkop, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo at: khirschk@uwaterloo.ca <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 06, 2009

For more information, contact: Ken Hirschkop

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MSA 11: Speaking of Grief: Death and Language in Modernism


If the Holocaust motivated aesthetic theorists and writers to rethink the premise of the literary mode altogether, stated in one form by Theodore Adorno in his 1951 claim that to write "poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," early-twentieth-century writers tended to respond to the most violent and rife deaths of their time by zeroing in on words themselves. We may find the most prominent meeting of fatality and diction in the modernist period in attacks on languages of militarism and commemoration instigated from a host of quarters, particularly from ex-servicemen after the Great War. "Abstract words such as glory, honor, courage, or hallow," Hemingway's lieutenant Frederic Henry would say, "were obscene beside the concrete names of villages, the number of roads, the names of rivers, the numbers of regiments and the dates." But modernist writers without combat experience, individually and collectively, also developed and made cases for taking diction and syntax in new directions amid or in reaction to mass destruction of life in Europe. From bombarding typefaces in the journal Blast to redefinitions of 'melancholy' in psychoanalysis to clear prose in "Politics and the English Language," fatal violence again and again prodded modernist writers to reconstruct language, changing the way it was used and the meanings it could carry. <br /> <br />This panel is interested in how modernist studies might work through the relationship between death and language, especially since the topic of violent ends has garnered much attention in recent political and theoretical work. For instance, Hemingway's turn to "concrete" words, a move Orwell and many others seconded in the '30s and '40s, seems to run against the current tide of trauma studies, which often sees inaccuracies or inexactness of language as paradoxically bearing truthful, reliable witness to violence. If "there is a sense in which a cold analysis of violence somehow reproduces and participates in its horror," as Slavoj Žižek as said in "Violence: Six Sideway Reflections" (2008), does it follow that modernist critics need to reconsider the language projects of Hemingway, Orwell, and other moder realist writers? Other topics to consider might include: <br /> <br />- speech/rhetoric of public commemoration <br />- dead languages and modern poetry <br />- violence, death and new techniques in visual arts <br />- death and punctuation <br />- death and translation <br />- death and dialogue <br />- languages/terms associated with grieving and mourning <br />- funerary and obituary discourses <br />- changes to traditional languages or uses of language in elegies <br /> <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biographical statement to Daniel Moore (4dwm5@queensu.ca) by 6 May 2009. This panel is proposed and needs to be reviewed for acceptance. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 06, 2009

For more information, contact: Daniel Moore

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MSA 11: Gothic Modernism


This panel will explore the various expressions of the Gothic <br />tradition in late 19th-century and early 20th-century culture. We will consider contributions on literature (both English and other languages), film as well the other visual arts, and significant intellectuals such as Freud, Benjamin, and Rudolf Otto, whose work intersects with the Gothic and informs contemporary scholarship on the Gothic tradition.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 05, 2009

For more information, contact: Sanford Schwartz

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MSA 11: Modernism and Nature


Modernist representation of nature and human relationships therewith – particularly of animals – has recently received increased critical attention in studies such as Carrie Rohman’s Stalking the Subject: Modernism and the Animal (Columbia UP, 2009) and Philip Armstrong’s What Animals Mean in the Fiction of Modernity (Routledge, 2008). Recently-published theoretical work on animal/human relations – such as Donna Haraway’s When Species Meet (U of Minnesota P, 2008), and Jacques Derrida’s The Animal That Therefore I Am (Fordham UP, 2008) – can also help us to arrive at a richer understanding of textual animals. Following these lines of inquiry, this panel will explore questions of the relationship between modernism and nature, with particular interest in representations of animals. Broad areas of inquiry might include the following: <br />o How do modernists understand the relationship between the artist and nature? <br />o What ethical questions are raised by modernist representations? <br />o What might examining the category of “nature” illuminate about modernism more generally? <br />Work with texts of any genre or media, and from any strand of modernism, is welcome. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement to Emily Essert (emily.essert@mail.mcgill.ca) by May 4th, 2009. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2009

For more information, contact: Emily Essert

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Modernism and the Free Market


J. M. Keynes's 1926 essay "The End of Laissez-Faire" may look overly optimistic to us today, particularly when he claims that no major economist of the past 50 years still believed in the free market as such. But while laissez-faire is still alive--if not exactly well--today, Keynes's essay does serve as a useful reminder that the free market, and liberalism with it, was undergoing a series of challenges and mutations whose repercussions are still with us today. This panel asks people to reflect on the relationship between modernism--viewed as both a historical epoch and an artistic movement--and the free market. I welcome submission both of papers with a more historical bent and of those with a more theoretical bent. <br /> <br />Possible paper topics include, but are certainly not limited to, <br />-Modernist economists and free market ideologies <br />-The relationship between totalitarian economic regimes and the free market <br />-Marxist theory and the free market <br />-Monopoly capitalism's challenge to laissez-faire <br />-The free market and the literary marketplace <br />-Modernist aesthetics and classical liberalism <br />-The New Deal, or other efforts in the modernist era to rework capitalism <br /> <br />Please send a short (max 300 word) abstract and a brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography to Peter Collins (pec133@psu.edu) by May 4th.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2009

For more information, contact: Peter Collins

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Thirties Modernism?


In spite of a recent resurgence in scholarship on British writing of the thirties it is still difficult to place the thirties with regard to modernism. The choice seems to be between charting a progressive history according to which transitional texts reveal the evolution of modernism into postmodernism, and separating the thirties out as a recessive literary moment devoid of pretensions to largeness or expansion (more devoted to social and political change than developments in literary form). This panel asks applicants to address the question of how we might reconcile these two competing approaches to the thirties. In a period that witnessed the extreme formalism of the little magazine _transition_, the strange realism of Christopher Isherwood, and the explicitly political writings of George Orwell, is any unified approach possible? Or, might we read the thirties alongside Fredric Jameson’s assessment of the twentieth century in _A Singular Modernity_ – he writes of “a dependence of the postmodern on what remain essentially modernist categories of the new”(5) – as a period whose established breaks should be reimagined as continuities? If it is productive to consider the twentieth century outside of the narrative of development from modernism to postmodernism, can we consider the strangeness of thirties literature as a particular object lesson, as a critique of modernism’s insistence on “the new,” instead of reading the thirties outside modernist paradigms in a way that implicitly devalues the thirties and privileges modernism? <br /> <br />I welcome papers that treat the thirties context broadly in these terms, as well as those that offer readings of particular texts written in the thirties. Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief bio to Liz Kuhn at ehk113@psu.edu by May 4. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2009

For more information, contact: Liz Kuhn

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Codes, Ciphers, and the Spy Thriller


Although codes have existed for thousands of years, modern cryptography did not emerge until the beginning of the twentieth century, when new communication technologies made possible the invention of mechanical code-making and code-breaking systems. While Friedrich Kittler suggests, in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter, that the development of such systems and their use by intelligence agencies made the spy herself an obsolete dimension of modern espionage, the persistence of the spy-hero alongside sophisticated coding and decoding techniques is a key characteristic of the genre in popular as well as high cultural texts of the modernist period. From John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) and Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes (1938) to Ian Fleming’s From Russia, with Love (1957), a fascination with codes, coded messages, and code-cracking has featured prominently in modern fictional representations of the factual, but mysterious world of spies and spy organizations. This panel seeks to explore the extent to which codes can be understood as a language of modernism. As the secret language of the world’s “second oldest profession,” codes and ciphers are superbly transgressive, linguistically and epistemologically liminal, occupying the shadowy thresholds between opposing structures of power, language, and knowledge. Yet the spy thriller, the preeminent literary venue for modern cryptography and an immensely popular genre, is often seen as formally conventional, even formulaic. How do the generic conventions of the spy thriller interact with the codes that play such an important role in their stories of suspense and intrigue? What can codes tell us about the relationship between the spy thriller and literary modernism? And what can the presence of codes, a highly experimental form of language, in the spy thriller tell us about the status of linguistic experimentation in European culture during the historical period associated with modernism? We welcome papers examining any aspect of codes and code-breaking in the spy thriller in any media (film, literature, radio, advertising, pulp magazines, etc.), ranging chronologically from the earliest instances of the spy genre to its contemporary incarnations.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2009

For more information, contact: Colin Gillis and Patrick Belk

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Speaking of New York


Speaking of New York <br /> <br />This panel hopes to explore the relationship between modern city space and modernist form, using New York City as a test case. I invite scholars in all disciplines to consider how changes in the built environment and population of New York City inflect the experimentation of early twentieth-century writers and artists from the naturalists to the New York School. What formal strategies allow writers in this period to represent urban modernity? Do different city spaces inspire different genres? How do experiences of city life such as noise, heteroglossia, and simultaneity make their way into modernist texts? What formal strategies are suggested by this increasingly dense, diverse, and mechanized space? What does modernism look like in the boroughs and how does it compare to the modernism of Manhattan? How does the exile represent New York differently from the migrant or the life-long resident? Interdisciplinary and transnational approaches are particularly welcome. <br /> <br />Please send a 300-word abstract and a 2-3 sentence scholarly biography to Sunny Stalter, Assistant Professor, Auburn University (sls0009@auburn.edu) by May 4, 2009.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 04, 2009

For more information, contact: Sunny Stalter

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MSA 11: Between Modernism and the Lyric


Please note: this panel description has been updated (7 April). <br /> <br />Understood variously as the voice of a solitary speaker whose words express inward emotional states (Mill's "feeling confessed to itself"); as unanswered cry for the absent mother or other; or as memorable, musical, formally patterned language that highlights all language's alterity, lyric poetry bring into focus questions about how selves inhabit language. This panel asks how modern poetry asks, and provisionally answers, such questions. Current work on the lyric often sets Romantic interiority against postmodernist models of language shaping the subject from without, and elides or misrepresents distinctively modernist engagements with the relation of subjectivity to poetry. How might current discussion of lyric be enriched by engaging modernism more fully? How do modern poets imagine the origin of their poetic language? How do they invoke, or complicate, models of interiority? What kinds of relationships between subjects (including the poetic "I" and addressees or readers) do modern lyric poems conjure? How does recent poetry draw on and revise elements of modernism in exploring how selves inhabit language? <br /> <br />Papers on aspects of modernist, mid-century, and contemporary poetry and poetics, and/ or theory of lyric, are invited, and might address topics including impersonality; confession; sincerity and authenticity; objectivity; emotion; analogies with visual arts, music, etc.; personae, masks, myth; address (including address to readers); pronouns (I, you, we); psychoanalytic models of language; speech acts and performativity; etc. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Reena Sastri (rs531@york.ac.uk) by 3 May 2009.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 03, 2009

For more information, contact: Reena Sastri

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Modernist In/Hospitality


The period stretching from the 1870s to the mid 1920s was marked by a sharp increase in global interactions. The rise of transnational political projects, culminating in the foundation of several international institutions and events, testifies to the emergence of a new global consciousness concomitant with the modernist period. This dynamics was experienced first hand by many modernists, whose life and works bear the mark of different languages and cultures. This panel seeks to investigate modernist productions (in literature, music, visual arts, theater, architecture etc…) in the light of their engagement with boundaries between cultures, spaces, languages, and forms. Modernist works constitute spaces of interaction and in/hospitality, be it linguistically, textually, or culturally. I invite paper proposals that study the modalities of these contacts. Possible topics include linguistic and cultural translation, untranslatability, the cosmopolitan and the vernacular, liminality, hybridity, gender/sexuality, avant-garde experimentation. Papers interested in interactions between Western and non-Western languages and cultures are particularly welcome. Please send 250-word abstracts and short biographical note to Edwige Tamalet Talbayev (etamalet@ucsd.edu) by 3 May 2009. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 03, 2009

For more information, contact: Edwige Tamalet Talbayev

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MSA 11: Vernacular Modernisms: What Are They When They're at Home?


Although some scholarly work has investigated the ways in which various types of modernist ideas and aesthetic tendencies have found articulation and received exposure in the quotidian sphere via advertising, film, popular psychology, popular music, new (household and workplace) technologies, as well as in profound developments in travel and communication, this panel seeks to push such analysis further. Papers are sought that critically explore articulations of modernism as they occur and are experienced in the everyday lifeworld. Arguments will be privileged that make strong claims about how specific engagements with vernacular forms of modernist ideologies, poetics, and practices, help to trouble folk perceptions of modernism as an elite cultural practice, designed for a target audience of hyper-educated specialists. In other words, what kinds of exposures to modernist ideologies were possible through daily interactions with material objects and other people similarly life-situated? What are the theoretical implications of vernacular modernism as everyday practice, and how do these experiences of vernacular modernism challenge characterizations of modernist practice, especially production and reception? <br /> <br /> <br />Please send a brief CV and abstract (max. 500 words) to Dr. Bradley D. Clissold (bradleyc@mun.ca) by 3 May 2009. <br /> <br />Conference Location: Montreal, Canada <br />Conference Starts: November 05, 2009 <br />Conference Ends: November 08, 2009 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: 3 May 2009 <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 04, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 03, 2009

For more information, contact: Dr. Bradley D. Clissold

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Difficult Queers


Since the publication of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Merrill Cole

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MSA 11: Languages of Dance and the Body


<br />LANGUAGES OF DANCE AND THE BODY: Panel Proposal for MSA 11 <br /> <br />2009 sees the centenary of the Ballet Russes with an international conference in Boston and a major exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (2010), and coincides with a burgeoning interest in dance and ballet in the early twentieth-century. This panel seeks to expand the consideration of the languages of dance and the body both within and beyond the impact of the Ballet Russes, encouraging dialogues between modern dance, popular dance, and ballet, across disciplinary boundaries, and across national borders. Papers should address how particular performances, forms, practitioners, companies or choreographers expressed or engaged with the discourses and dialogues of modernism. <br /> <br />Possible topics might be: <br />- modern dance and national culture <br />- physical culture and modern dance <br />- fashion, form and dancing bodies <br />- visual culture and modern dance <br />- non-narrative dance and modernist fiction <br />- hieroglyphics and dance <br />- Bloomsbury modernism and dance <br />- natural bodies and technological bodies in modern dance <br />- photography, film and modern dance <br />- cabaret, burlesque and spectacular display <br />- dance and fascism <br />- the Ballets Russes in South America <br />- dancing spaces, dance halls, theatres, stages <br />- New York Dada and dance <br />- dance crazes <br /> <br />Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV to Dr Alex Goody, Oxford Brookes University, UK (agoody@brookes.ac.uk) <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Alex Goody

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Modernism and Trust at MSA 11, Nov 5-7, 2009


The aesthetic innovations of modernist art and literature radically changed the role of trust in the relationship between artists and their publics. The novelty and difficulty of much modernist writing left critics and readers with no reliable measure of authenticity, creating the permanent possibility of hoaxes like Witter Bynner’s fictitious “Spectra” school of poetry. This condition of doubt was exacerbated by a crisis of critical authority: as Virginia Woolf observed in 1923, there was no longer any “centralising influence” to counter the “ungenerous distrust of contemporary genius.” In the face of radical novelty and in the absence of unified canons of taste, such distrust was a common response. Some early readers of Ulysses, for example, were prone to conclude that “a gigantic effort has been made to fool the world of readers,” while Judge John M. Woolsey’s ruling on the novel’s decency insisted, on the contrary, on Joyce’s honesty and sincerity: “I hold that ‘Ulysses’ is a sincere and honest book.” The very necessity of affirming such an opinion puts us in the realm of trust: Joyce’s sincerity could be the object of more or less judicious belief, but not of apodictic knowledge. <br /> Lawrence Rainey has recently described the “deep, ‘quasi-religious’ or systemic trust requisite both to melodrama and modernity, trust independent of immediacies of context and inductive knowledge,” but such direct considerations of the topic are rare in modernist studies. On the other hand, the territory demarcated by “trust” abuts several of the discipline’s key concepts, such as sincerity, authority, cultural capital, advertising, professionalism and mass culture. Trust also articulates such concepts with recent work in modernist reception studies, by foregrounding the suspicious responses that modernism aroused, and the mechanisms by which modernist authors sought to authenticate their writings. And, turning to the content and concerns of modernist texts, the theme of trust also seems particularly pertinent to a literary movement so marked by existential isolation and epistemological doubt. Trust, then, suggests itself as a neglected tool in modernist scholarship and one that will shed light on some of the central concerns of the field. <br /> For MSA 11 in Montreal (November 5-8, 2009), we are looking for paper proposals that address the issue of modernism and trust. Possible topics include: <br />• distrust and suspicion in the reception of modernism <br />• the circulation of trust in modernist periodicals and other institutions <br />• honesty, sincerity, authenticity <br />• strategies of authentication; the modernist “imprimatur” <br />• hoaxes <br />• expertise and certification <br />• the rhetorical notion of ethos <br />• trust and advertising <br />• trust and the crisis of critical authority <br />• trust and censorship <br />• trust and distrust within artistic groups and networks <br />• trust as theme: solipsism, scepticism, jealousy, doubt, etc. <br />300-word abstracts should be sent to leonard.diepeveen@dal.ca and attridge.j@gmail.com by 1 May. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Leonard Diepeveen or John Attriddge

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Modern Magazines


To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class. <br /> <br />Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu) <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Christopher Reed

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MSA 11: &quot;Modern Magazines&quot;


CFP: “Modern Magazines”; Modernist Studies Association Conference, November 5-8, 2009, Montréal, Canada <br /> <br />MODERN MAGAZINES <br /> <br />To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this MSA panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class. <br /> <br />Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV by 1 May to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu) <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Christopher Reed

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Blowing up Babel - escaping language in modernism


This panel will explore modernist attempts to circumvent the limits of language by exploding the barriers that language erects between signifier and signified. Such efforts try to forge immediate and uniquely effective communication either by focusing on sound or on the visual aspects of language, free of the baggage of "normal" speech. This panel will explore the links between artistic, reformist and rationalist attempts to invent a truly "modern" language. Schwitters in Germany (the "Ursonate") and Khlebnikov and Kkruchnykh in Russia (Zaum) re-invent language by concentrating on sound - new sounds that could create new perceptions and new languages. In another vein Zukofsky attempts homophonic translations of Catullus in order to liberate in English the "living matter" that inheres in the sound of Catullus' Latin. Perhaps more commonly, others seek to revivify language and strengthen its connection to the "real" by focusing on the visual. Freud interprets dreams by elaborating aural/visual puns; Abraham and Torok develop his idea in their cryptonymy (from The Wolf Man's Magic Word) a systematic retracing of the Wolf Man's dream vocabulary through a multilingual register of puns linked to images. The Scots poet Ian Hamilton Finlay revivifies words in concrete poems and installations including his "Little Sparta" garden. In a rationalist, reformist vein Otto Neurath devises the isotype system as a clarifying visual supplement to linguistic communication. On the fringes, mad reformers such as the Australian Charles Bliss invent "semantography" or blissymbolics (1969-65) in order to provide a means of impartial, universal communication. Currently, the Chinese artist Xu Bing is "writing" The Book from the Ground , a novel written entirely in signage. <br /> <br />I am looking for papers that explore any aspect of such efforts to either supplement or replace language by focusing on sound or sight. Please send 300 word proposals and brief bio by May 1. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Quebec,, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Margaret Bruzelius

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Handling Modernist Materials


This panel sets out to explore how the materials of modernist artistic production intersect with methods of handling the works themselves and with the interpretive strategies brought to bear upon them. Spanning philosophical and empirical approaches to materiality, the topics covered in this panel include: the physical production and conservation of books, pamphlets and periodicals, and the way these issues might relate to hermeneutic analysis; the sourcing of raw materials for plastic art projects and subsequent challenges in housing and curating such works; and the technical advancements of early film production and the sometimes severe challenges in conserving early film stock. Do modernist writers and artists employ their materials in ways that generate specific problems (and innovations) for conservation and analysis? Are there specific kinds of degeneration and decay implicit in the material embodiments of modernist aesthetic acts? Can issues of materiality and aesthetic innovation in modernism throw light on contemporary challenges of digitization in film, literature, music and various multimedia? <br /> <br />Please send 300-word proposals and a brief bio by May 1. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Mark Byron

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MSA 11: Aesthetic Depictions of Violence in Modernist Literature, 1890-1940


When Oscar Wilde rhetorically asked, in 1891, “What is the death of a vague individual if it enables an immortal word to blossom and to create, in Keats’ words, an eternal source of ecstasy?” his l’art pour l’art glorification of aesthetic violence was surely intended to provoke reactions from middle-class Victorians. Stylistic renderings of violence, however, run throughout British, Irish, Continental and American modernist literature. Walter Benjamin’s famous 1936 diagnosis, that mankind’s “self-alienation has reached such a degree that it can experience its own destruction as an aesthetic pleasure of the first order,” provided an early definition of fascist modernism, but scenes of physical and psychic violence in modernist texts continue to complicate our readings of these works. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to examine the roles aesthetic violence play in international modernist literature between 1890 and 1940. Possible topics include but are not limited to: <br /> <br />• Contextualizing the role(s) of aesthetic violence in movements such as Futurism and Vorticism. <br />• Anti-Enlightenment violence and the cult of the instinct <br />• Female modernists’ participation in, and/or resistance to, aesthetic violence <br />• Anti-colonial modernist depictions of violence <br />• Literature of the Harlem Renaissance and the aesthetics of primitivism and/or slavery <br />• Modernist literary use of psychoanalytic theories of the oedipal complex and castration <br />• Modernist interpretations of violent mythology <br />• Apocalyptic modernist visions <br />• Destruction as renewal in modernist literature <br />• Modernist depictions of war <br /> <br />Please send a brief biographical statement and abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr. Jennifer Gilchrist (jengilchrist@gmail.com) by May 1, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Jennifer Gilchrist

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Beyond Exile: Place and Placelessness in Modernist Literature


Exile implies a home, however long lost; it implies something to which return, even if practically impossible, can be imagined. This panel will consider deeper states of estrangement from place, and by extension often from language as well. What of characters who have no home to long for? For whom even their "native" language feels foreign? What of novels or poems that thematize or enact such displacement in their form or style? This panel invites papers that consider the phenomenon of non-belonging to place or language in modernist literature. Please send abstract of 300 words and a brief bio to Maren Linett at mlinett@purdue.edu by May 1, 2009.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Maren Linett

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MSA 11:


<br />J. L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Stanley Cavell have each influenced not only philosophy of language but also the practice of literary criticism. This panel invites papers addressing any aspect of the relation between these thinkers and modernism in the arts, from the mutual indebtedness of their philosophical writings and modernist aesthetics to the application of ordinary language philosophy procedures to the study of modernist writers. Please send 300-word abstracts and brief (2-3 sentence) bios to Kevin Lamb (KML2104@columbia.edu) by May 1, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Kevin Lamb

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MSA 11: Psychoanalysis and Literature as Modernist Languages of the Negative


Psychoanalysis and literature can be considered mutually informing theories of language, particularly in modernism. Psychoanalysis, with its emphasis on dream structures and on partial memories, offers an account of interpretation that is essentially literary, as Mary Jacobus has argued. In terms of literary scholarship, Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy argue that “literature” after Kant essentially is theory, characterized by the fragment. In terms of psychoanalysis, André Green argues that the negative, stemming from Freud’s discovery of the unconscious, informs psychoanalysis. <br /> <br />This panel asks: How does our understanding of psychoanalytic theory influence our approach to modern literature, and vice versa? More important, how are both approaches to interpretation grounded in notions of the negative? In what way do both literature and psychoanalysis become modernist models for thought? Papers welcome on (re)conceiving modernist notions of thinking and/or interpretation founded in the negative. Possible topics: trauma, memory, form, representation, the image. <br /> <br />Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Celia Carlson (cc@hevanet.com) by May 1, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: May 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Celia Carlson

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Bad Language?: The Poetics of the Erotic in Modernism


This is a call for papers for a proposed panel at MSA 11 <br /> <br />Bad Language?: The Poetics of the Erotic in Modernism <br /> <br />In the texts of modernist cultures, we find vulgar language, pleasures spoken and <br />unspoken, and the generic and semantic challenges of sex. Paradoxically, the <br />deployment of the erotic in modernist texts, artifacts, and productions may have a <br />decorum all its own. <br /> <br />This panel will explore new ways of thinking about erotic language and its uses. What <br />languages are available to speak the erotic? What are the erotic codes we find in <br />modernist cultures, and how are they used? Possible topics may include: erotica in the <br />modernist period (visual, textual, other); sex manuals, marriage manuals, the discourses <br />of science and hygiene and their relationship to the erotic; sociocultural/historical <br />influences on erotic language; erotica across/the erotics of race, class, nation, <br />orientation; memoirs and diaries of erotic life; advertising; journalism; code-switching; <br />dirty words; the impact of technology on erotic language; political and/or national <br />movements and their languages around the erotic, etc. etc. <br /> <br />Abstracts of no more than 500 words accompanied by a brief CV should be sent by April <br />30 to Janine Utell, Widener University, at jmutell(at)mail(dot)widener(dot)edu. <br />Inclusion in the MSA 11 program is contingent upon the acceptance of the panel by MSA <br />reviewers. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Janine Utell

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Languages of Class, Commodification and Crisis: Economic Fictions in the Modern Novel


Panel Proposal for the 11th Modernist Studies Association Conference <br /> <br />As Georg Lukacs, Fredric Jameson and others have demonstrated, the novel is fundamentally implicated in the rise of industrial capitalism and bourgeois culture. Building upon this premise, we would like to explore connections among the form and subject matter of the modern novel and the functioning of the modern economy. We are particularly interested in the novel's capacity to stage economic crises and contradictions. Papers might focus on <br /> <br />--interactions among the languages of economics, nationalism and the novel <br />--connections between representational and financial crises <br />--economic fictions (both in the novel and in the monetary system) <br />--the interplay of monetary and other semiotic systems <br />--realism and Marxist criticism <br />--class struggle and the novel form <br />--fictional narratives and the commodity form <br />--the novel as economic allegory <br /> <br /> <br />Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief biographical statement to David Huntsperger (dhuntsperger@ltu.edu) by April 30th, 2009. <br /> <br />David Huntsperger <br />Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Communication <br />Lawrence Technological University <br />dhuntsperger@ltu.edu <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: David Huntsperger

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MSA 11: Weimar Germany through Foreign Eyes


The fifteen years of the Weimar Republic were a time not only of incomparable artistic creativity, but also of unprecedented intellectual exchanges across national boundaries. The Soviet revolution drove several hundred thousand Russians into exile in Germany, among them poets, artists and intellectuals such as Viktor Shklovsky or Vladimir Nabokov. At the same time, many supporters of the new Soviet regime also visited Berlin, sparking a fervent exchange between two enormously productive avant-gardes. The weak economy and hyper-inflation, meanwhile, made Germany an attractive destination for visitors from Western Europe and America, many of whom, including W.H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood, came as tourists but stayed for extended periods of time. The international success of the UFA film studio, finally, meant that Weimar culture was put on view around the globe. <br />For this panel, I invite proposals on the image of German modernist culture in the works of foreigners. How did Weimar culture affect the production of artists from abroad? How did they describe Germany in their letters and diaries? How were modernist ideas disseminated through transnational networks? And what happened to the image of Weimar after the Nazi seizure of power? Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Tobias Boes (tboes@nd.edu) by April 30, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Tobias Boes

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MSA 11: Rethinking Futurism, 1909-2009


It has been 100 years since F. T. Marinetti published his now famous Futurist Manifesto, singing the love of danger, the habit of energy and rashness. Other manifesti would follow, of course, and the Futurists' fascinations with speed, violence, machinery, masculinity, warfare, and the technology of print have become important aspects of our thinking the early twentieth century avant-garde, both in Italy and throughout Europe. Futurism would change and mature through its engagement with two world wars, an array of political regimes, and multiple geographical and cultural contexts. <br /> This panel asks: How has our understanding of Italian Futurism changed over the last century? and How must it still evolve? Papers on any aspect of the Futurist movement are welcome, and need not be limited to focus on Italian artists and writers. We encourage papers that explore lesser known contributors to Futurism, and relationships between Futurism and other movements. We are open to studies of any medium and welcome papers that bridge disciplines. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief biographical statement (2-3 sentences) to Catherine E. Paul (cpaul@clemson.edu) by April 30, 2009. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Catherine E. Paul

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The Everyday Languages of Modernism


In his claim that “the life of a village is narrative” whereas in the city “the visual impressions succeed each other, overlap, overcross, they are ‘cinematographic’,” Ezra Pound efficiently characterizes what is arguably modernism’s primary discursive mode, one devoted to the shock and speed of the modern. Along these lines, modernism’s investement in the defamiliarizing potential of the aesthetic experience (e.g. the Joycean or Imagist epiphany) is interested in the ordinary or commonplace only insofar as they are to be transcended. But the manifold languages of modernism address a far greater (if arguably less sexy) range of everyday social contexts and experiences, including routine and the familiar. This panel considers how modernists attuned their languages (literary, visual, sculptural etc.) to various forms of everyday life--not in an effort to condemn, for instance, its homogeneity, but to levelheadedly assess if not value its salutary functions and practices. <br /> <br />Topics and concepts to consider: <br /> <br />-routine and ritual <br />-everyday life and urban social space <br />-spaces and forms of dwelling <br />-communal forms; the role of community <br />-everyday domestic labour <br />-the gender of the quotidian <br />-modernisms and food <br />-modernisms and errands <br />-modernisms and/at rest <br />-boredom, fatigue <br />-knowledge vs know-how <br />-quotidian time <br /> <br />Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV to Connor Byrne, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. Canada (connor.byrne@dal.ca) <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Connor Byrne

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Against Surrealism


While Surrealism exerted a major influence on twentieth-century literature, visual art, and philosophy, it might be fair to say that much of that influence was closer to an opposition. For instance, Georges Bastille, Raymond Queneau and Oulipo, Walter Benjamin, and the dozens of writers and artists that Breton excommunicated, all broke, in various ways, with Surrealism. <br /> <br />This panel is looking for papers on writers, visual artists, and/or theorists who critiqued, rejected or substantially redirected the various Surrealist impulses. Please send completed papers or abstracts to Bill Freind (freind@rowan.edu) by April 30. <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Bill Freind

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The Language of Legitimacy: Modernist Justice and Justification


<br />The Language of Legitimacy: Modernist Justice and Justification <br /> <br />One of the more astonishing developments in the wake of The Great War was the manner in which writers redefined the qualitative nature of political legitimacy. In 1919, a middle-aged and conservative Thomas Mann could, in his strange book Reflections of a Nonpolitical Man, still use “legitimacy” to refer to the natural, historical, and visible powers of justice. However, such traditional rationality did not satisfy emerging radical and revolutionary desires for a political legitimacy embodied, beyond rational or legal positivism, in an indefinable, elusive presence somehow found, variously, in a population’s will, beliefs, norms, or spirit. While the consequences of this new legitimacy were many and of different degrees, surely Carl Schmitt’s legal contortions of legitimacy in 1932, which ultimately justify enabling Hitler’s Nazi Party with dictatorial power and dissolving the Weimar Republic, ranks the most decisive. <br /> <br />This panel seeks to examine how early twentieth-century writers from all over the globe theorize legitimacy in political, aesthetic, legal, and literary ideologies, and how they exploit a new, distinctly modernist sense of legitimacy to represent and confer power. Possible topics could include: <br /> <br />-theorizing and representing emergency powers in modernist fiction (e.g. 1926 UK General Strike, 1916 Easter Uprising, etc.) <br />-insurrection, revolution, and Communist or populist literature <br />-the search for adequate literary and artistic reactions to political despair by authors, artists, and poets <br />-hellbent, crackpot modernist harangues and defenses (e.g. Pound’s Italian radio addresses, The Southern Agrarians’ I’ll Take My Stand, Wyndham Lewis’ The Jews, Are They Human?, etc.) <br />-justifying/condemning the avant-garde <br />-narratives of justification in nationalist literatures <br />-“scientific” racist and anti-Semitic tracts <br />-the relationship between legitimacy and totalizing form (of government, of art, etc.) <br />-work by any of the following writers: Carl Schmitt, CLR James, Samuel Weber, Georges Sorel, etc. <br />-theories of force and violence in the law <br />-Nazi cinema <br />-the “legitimate” appeals of the mass and the crowd <br /> <br />Please send a brief CV and abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr. Adam Beardsworth (abeardsworth@swgc.mun.ca) by April 30, 2009. <br /> <br />Conference Location: Montreal, Canada <br />Conference Starts: November 05, 2009 <br />Conference Ends: November 08, 2009 <br /> <br />CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009 <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 09, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Adam Beardsworth

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MSA 11: Modernist Lies and the Lying Modernists Who Tell Them


Modernist Lies and the Lying Modernists Who Tell Them <br /> (with apologies to Al Franken) <br /> <br />What do modernists lie about? <br />What constitutes a lie in a modernist text? <br />How (rhetorically, formally) do modernists lie? <br /> <br />This panel seeks to interrogate the language of lying in modernist texts. Papers would ideally go beyond identifying instances of lying to consider how lies influence the structure, meaning, or reception of a text. Proposals especially welcome that address questions of genre or boundaries between genres. Please send a short abstract (300 words) and bio to Jessica Weare, jweare@stanford.edu, by April 30th.

Conference Location: Montr, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Jessica Weare

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The Mddlebrow Lexicon


What were the buzzwords of middlebrow modernisms, and how did they delimit, prescribe, challenge, or otherwise color the relations between the middlebrow and other types of cultural production? Papers may focus on particular words—e.g., “sentimental”—and their texts and contexts or on reception case studies that illuminate issues of terminology. <br /> <br />Please send a one-page abstract (approximately 300 words) to jcasey@skidmore.edu by April 30th. <br /> <br />

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 07, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 30, 2009

For more information, contact: Janet Casey

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Languages of translation


In keeping with the theme, “the languages of modernism,” I would like to propose a round-table on literary translation to be called (tentatively) “Translating the difficult text or ‘How languages speak.’” Heidegger famously claimed that “language speaks,” implying that poetry itself is best understood as an art of listening and composition an act of discovery. The work of the poet / translator might then be to allow the original to speak without interpretation. To explore this topic, I seek translators, translator / poets and scholars who have worked with experimental prosodies, abject subject matter, or other “difficult’ texts and who have explored the impact of those practices on English language poetry. Clearly there is a rich history related to this topic, from Futurism and Dada through Surrealism and a variety of constructivist or conceptual practices like “ecriture.” At this point I need brief statements of particular interests in this vein. Each participant in the round-table, as I imagine it, will speak for 5 minutes about the particular difficulties of translating works that challenge norms of English language expression. Equally it may be that as a result of such translation English has become more plastic and malleable. At this point I seek statements of interest, no more than two pages in length.

Conference Location: Montreal, Canada
Conference Starts: November 05, 2009
Conference Ends: November 08, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: April 16, 2009

For more information, contact: Donald Wellman

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MLA 09 Proposed Session: Mina Loy


Art and Ekphrasis in Mina Loy’s Lunar Baedeker <br /> <br />Abstracts are invited for a proposed special session at the 2009 MLA Convention, to be held December 27-30 in Philadelphia, PA. <br /> <br />Deadline: March 15 2009 <br /> <br />The “Art and Ekphrasis in Mina Loy’s Lunar Baedeker” session seeks papers focusing on artistic and literary relationships between Mina Loy’s poetry and either her artwork or the work of her contemporaries, such as Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Gertrude Stein, Wyndham Lewis, James Joyce, and William Carlos Williams. <br /> <br />Send 250-word proposals to Tara Prescott (tara.prescott@cgu.edu) by March 15, 2009. <br /> <br />Visit the website at http://www.cgu.edu/pages/6202.asp <br />

Conference Location: Philadelphia, U.S.A.
Conference Starts: December 27, 2009
Conference Ends: December 30, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: March 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Tara Prescott

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Buffalo Joyce conference CFP - deadline extended


"Eire on the Erie," the North American James Joyce Conference to be held this year in Buffalo, NY, June 13-17, is extending its deadline for submissions to March 1. Instructions on how to submit are at <br /> <br /> http://english.buffalo.edu/jamesjoyce/call_for_papers/ <br /> <br />while a general overview of the conference is at <br /> <br /> http://english.buffalo.edu/jamesjoyce/ <br /> <br />Submissions, 150 - 200 words, should be sent to <br /> <br /> jj2009@buffalo.edu <br /> <br />and all other inquiries to <br /> <br /> dedalus449@netscape.net <br />

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: June 13, 2009
Conference Ends: June 17, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: March 01, 2009

For more information, contact: Mark Shechner

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James Joyce Conference, Buffalo, June 2009


The deadline is rapidly approaching for submissions to present at "Eire on the Erie: The North American James Joyce Conference" to be held this year in Buffalo, New York. The deadline is February 15. In addition to the academic program, there will be readings by Irish novelist Colum McCann and an opening exhibition of the University at Buffalo James Joyce Collection: "Discovering James Joyce." Also, since Buffalo has its own festive Bloomsday celebration every June 16, Joyce scholars will be invited to join that ongoing activity at the conclusion of the annual Bloomsday banquet. <br /> <br />The entire program can be found at the web site: http://english.buffalo.edu/jamesjoyce/ <br /> <br />The call for papers can be found at http://english.buffalo.edu/jamesjoyce/call_for_papers/ <br /> <br />Submissions may be posted as e-mail attachments to jj2009@buffalo.edu <br /> <br />All other questions can be addressed to conference director Mark Shechner at dedalus449@netscape.net <br /> <br />We look forward to seeing you in June. <br /> <br />Sincerely, <br /> <br />Mark Shechner <br />Conference Director <br />Eire on the Erie

Conference Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Conference Starts: June 12, 2009
Conference Ends: June 17, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Mark Shechner

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Modernism, Cultural Exchange and Transnationality: The Second Conference of the Modernist Magazines Project


<br />Modernism, Cultural Exchange and Transnationality: The Second Conference of the Modernist Magazines Project <br /> <br />Sussex, 15-17 July 2009 <br /> <br />Deadline: 15 February 2009 <br /> <br />The interest in much current critical debate in questions of national and transnational identities has helped restore and enliven the conception of modernism and the avant-garde as twin international formations across the arts. Magazines were instrumental in publicizing the new movements and frequently did so, singly or in the company of others, with an ambition to intervene in the public or international sphere. <br /> <br />The second conference of the Modernist Magazines Project invites <br />proposals for papers which explore the role magazines have played in the <br />broad networks of modernist art, ideas and politics in shaping and <br />re-articulating regional, national, and cross-national identities. The conference will concentrate on but not be limited to the period 1880-1960 in Britain, Europe and the USA. Papers which fall outside these parameters but illuminate the conference themes are welcome. <br /> <br />Papers will be 20 minutes in length and may be on individual magazines or the place of magazines in groups and movements. Possible panel themes which explore magazines in relation to Modernism, Cultural Exchange and Transnationality will include: Design and Production; Editors and Readers; Feminism; Communism; Fascism; Manifestoes; Futurism; Surrealism; Migrant modernists; Expressionism; Dada; Image and Text; Film; Drama; New Media; Patronage and Public; Modernity and Mass Society; Technologies and Gender; English Traditions; Nationalist <br />positions; Being American; Cosmopolitanism; A New Europe; Why Paris, why Berlin? <br /> <br />Key Note Speakers: <br /> <br />Mark Morrisson (Penn State University, author of The Public Face of Modernism: Little Magazines, Audiences and Reception, 1905 -1920) <br /> <br />Tim Benson (Rifkind Center, LA County Museum of Modern Art, editor of Central European Avant-Gardes: Exchange and Transformation 1910-1930) <br /> <br />The conference will be held at the University of Sussex from 15th to 17th July 2009. <br /> <br />The deadline for the submission of proposals (200-250 words) is the 15th February 2009. <br />Proposals for papers should be sent to Christian Weikop <br />(C.Weikop@sussex.ac.uk) <br /> <br />Dr Christian Weikop <br />School of Humanities, Arts B229 <br />University of Sussex <br />Falmer Brighton BN1 9QN <br />Email: c.weikop@sussex.ac.uk <br /> <br />Visit the website at http://www.cts.dmu.ac.uk/exist/mod_mag/index.htm

Conference Location: Sussex, United Kingdom
Conference Starts: June 15, 2009
Conference Ends: July 15, 2009

CFP Submission Deadline: February 15, 2009

For more information, contact: Dr Christian Weikop

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