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Constitutional Modernisms

'Matters of the state and state building,' as Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz wrote one decade ago, have received concerted attention in the new modernist studies. However, much of that attention has preserved the unilateral and agonistic model of influence sketched by Mao and Walkowitz, which is concerned primarily with œ'the effects of the state on modernist production' and modernist efforts to elude or to intervene in 'œpolitics as such.'

This panel will explore new models of influence and intervention, building on recent work by Michael Gardiner, Ravit Reichman, John Marx, Sascha Bru, Aarthi Vadde, Timothy Hyde, and others to consider modernism’s relationship to the putative hallmark of the modern state: constitutional governance.

Preference will be given to proposals that use specific examples and case studies to address broad theoretical, conceptual, and methodological questions, such as:

- Can literature introduce new forms of government?
- How do modernist actors and institutions participate in the art of governance?
- How do modernist cultures produce or channel constitutional change (formal or informal)?
- Which constitutional priniciples or arrangements are endorsed by modernist manifestos and avant-garde movements?
- What legal norms, demographic changes, and territorial alignments does modernism mediate?
- What does modernism contribute to the writing, revision, or destruction of state constitutions?
- What are the aesthetic, rhetorical, and figurative conceits of modern constitutionalism?
- How are states affected by the non-governmental and/or transnational character of modernist cultural production?

Please send 200-300 word abstract and brief bio to Ryan Weberling (ryanweb@bu.edu) by April 1.


Conference Location: Columbus, OH, United States
Conference Starts: November 08, 2018
Conference Ends: November 11, 2018

CFP Submission Deadline: April 02, 2018

For more information, contact: Ryan Weberling

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